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Automatic atrial threshold measurement and adjustment in pediatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147014
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2010 Mar;33(3):309-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Anita Hiippala
Gerald A Serwer
Eva Clausson
Lynn Davenport
Trina Brand
Juha-Matti Happonen
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2010 Mar;33(3):309-13
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - physiopathology - surgery - therapy
Cardiac Pacing, Artificial - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Finland
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Infant
Male
Michigan
Pacemaker, Artificial
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Automatic threshold measurement and output adjustment are used as default settings in modern pacemakers. The purpose of the study was to assess Atrial Capture Management (ACM) of Medtronic pacemakers in pediatric patients.
Forty children were enrolled in two centers. Median age was 9.8 years (range 0.8-17.5 years). Half had undergone surgery for congenital heart defects; 45% of patients had an epicardial atrial lead. The pacing indication was atrioventricular block in 82% of patients and sinus node disease in 18%. Manually determined atrial thresholds and ACM measurements were compared.
ACM measurements were within the expected variation in 37/40 (93%) of the patients. In one patient the threshold was 0.625-V lower manually than with ACM. One patient had too high an intrinsic atrial rate for ACM to be able to measure threshold. The mean threshold at 0.4 ms was 0.69 +/- 0.32 V manually and 0.68 +/- 0.35 V with ACM (two-tailed paired t-test, P = 0.52) in all patients. The mean difference was 0.012 V (95% confidence interval: -0.027, 0.053). The mean endocardial threshold was 0.70 +/- 0.36 V manually and 0.69 +/- 0.38 V with ACM; epicardial threshold was 0.67 +/- 0.27 V manually and 0.68 +/- 0.32 V with ACM. The difference between the measurements was 0.012 V for endocardial and 0.014 V for epicardial leads. No atrial arrhythmias due to ACM measurements were observed.
ACM measures atrial thresholds reliably in pediatric patients with both endocardial and epicardial leads, allowing its use in both. Constant high intrinsic atrial rate may prevent automatic threshold measurement in young children.
PubMed ID
19954505 View in PubMed
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Automatic ventricular threshold measurement in children with epicardial pacing leads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170991
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2006 Jan;29(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Anita Hiippala
Eva Clausson
Henrik Ekblad
Markku Leskinen
Juha-Matti Happonen
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 2006 Jan;29(1):41-7
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrocardiography
Electrodes, Implanted
Female
Finland
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - therapy
Heart Ventricles
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the safety and reliability of automatic ventricular pacing threshold measurement, the Medtronic Capture Management (CM), in children with epicardial pacing leads. CM has not been recommended for use with epicardial leads due to lack of pertinent data.
During a 2-year study period, 34 children (mean age 6.1 years, range 0 days to 17.7 years) with epicardial leads were prospectively enrolled. The CM measurements were compared with in-office ventricular pacing threshold measurements. Thirty bipolar and five unipolar epicardial leads were assessed.
CM measurements were successful and reliable in 30 out of 35 leads (86%). The mean threshold with CM was 1.16 V (95% CI 1.07-1.26 V), and with standard measurement was 1.18 V (95% CI 1.09-1.28 V), at a pulse width of 0.40 ms. The reasons for failure were evoked response undersensing in two cases (5.7%), and high intrinsic rate in one case. High pacing thresholds prevented accurate CM measurements in two cases.
CM automatic threshold measurements are consistent with standard ventricular pacing threshold measurements in children with epicardial leads. We recommend a period of monitoring CM performance before programming it to adjust output according to automatic threshold measurements, in order to find the patients in whom it does not work. The CM feature provides increased pacing safety when it measures well (86% of leads). A larger study is needed to prove the tendency for extending battery life in children with epicardial leads.
PubMed ID
16441716 View in PubMed
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Cardiac function assessment in patients with family history of nonhypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a prenatal and postnatal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173111
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2005 Sep-Oct;26(5):543-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
S R F F Pedra
L K Hornberger
S M Leal
G P Taylor
J F Smallhorn
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology and the Department of Pediatric Laboratory Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 2005 Sep-Oct;26(5):543-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Echocardiography
Endocardial Fibroelastosis - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Fetal Heart - abnormalities - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Humans
Pedigree
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke Volume
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - congenital - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Nonobstructive cardiomyopathies (CMs) may be familial in 20â"55% of cases. Little is known about the role of fetal echocardiography in such cases. We evaluated the cardiac function serially pre- and postnatally in cases with a family history of nonobstructive CM. The fetal and postnatal studies were performed in the echocardiogarphy laboratory at a tertiary institution. Twenty-six cases from 16 families with a family history of CM were studied. Three fetal echocardiograms were performed at or near 18, 25, and 32 weeks of gestation for complete cardiac functional assessment. Postnatally clinical evaluation, electrocardiogram, and an echocardiogram were performed within the first 3 months, with serial reevaluation for those identified with CM. The mean follow-up was 46 +/- 9 months. Abnormal cardiac function was observed in 8 cases (30%). Six had a previously affected sibling, 1 had other family members affected, and 1 had both antecedents. Four had dilated CM diagnosed prenatally of which 1 recovered, 2 died in utero, and 1 died soon after birth. The remaining 4 had normal fetal echoes and were diagnosed with CM in the first 3 months of life. Three had dilated CM with recovery, and 1 had restrictive CM requiring cardiac transplantation. This study demonstrates a high familial recurrence rate of CM. Fetal echo is useful for early diagnosis, although a normal study does not preclude ventricular dysfunction at a later stage, justifying serial prenatal and postnatal evaluation. Early identification may expedite listing for transplantation.
PubMed ID
16132314 View in PubMed
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[Clinical course and evaluation of the functional state of the cardio-vascular system in children with congenital heart defects]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44842
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967;6:9-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1967
Author
V M Sidel'nikov
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1967;6:9-12
Date
1967
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology
Humans
Infant
PubMed ID
5603475 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Content of myocardial catecholamines in patients with natural and acquired heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10162
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(3):47-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A I Hozhenko
O V Bieliakov
L A Kovalevs'ka
V T Selyvanenko
O O Svirs'kyi
H S Popik
O B Voloshyna
V V Stepanov
Author Affiliation
Odessa Medical University, Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine.
Source
Fiziol Zh. 2001;47(3):47-53
Date
2001
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aortic Valve - pathology
English Abstract
Epinephrine - analysis
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology
Heart Diseases - diagnosis - surgery - therapy
Heart Valve Diseases - physiopathology
Humans
Mitral Valve - pathology
Myocardium - metabolism
Norepinephrine - analysis
Pulmonary Valve Stenosis - physiopathology
Rheumatic Heart Disease - physiopathology
Abstract
Approved by increased considered of adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in myocard of patients with native and acquisition of the heart diseases a speciality at part of the heart with largest functional working load. Taking increased levels of adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the different parts of the heart at the sever patients with heart diseases usually with progressive heart's decompensation the recommendation preventive cardio-stimulation of the time of the surgery operation on the heart for correction of cardiac arrhythmic.
PubMed ID
11519250 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of primary level antenatal screening for severe congenital heart disease: a population-based assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211150
Source
J Perinatol. 1996 Sep-Oct;16(5):336-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
B G Sinclair
G G Sandor
D F Farquharson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Perinatol. 1996 Sep-Oct;16(5):336-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Sensitivity and specificity
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
The four-chamber view of the fetal heart has been advocated as an effective antenatal screen for severe forms of congenital heart disease (CHD). To evaluate the sensitivity of this test at a primary care level, a retrospective review was undertaken for the period 1988 to 1992 of ultrasonograms of fetuses referred for fetal echocardiography, mothers of neonates referred for cardiac assessment, and perinatal deaths attributed to CHD. The study centers serve a population base of 3.5 million persons. Sixty-nine cases of severe forms of CHD were reviewed. The diagnoses were chosen because all show abnormal findings on four-chamber view: 38 hypoplastic left heart syndrome, 13 pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, and 17 variants of univentricular heart. The cases involved a total of 94 scans. These were reviewed by diagnosis and stratified by gestational age and year of scanning. No diagnosis was made at a gestational age younger than 16 weeks. From 16 weeks to term, overall sensitivity was 40% (32/80 scans); sensitivity improved with advanced gestational age (34% to 48% at 16 to 24 and > 24 weeks' gestation, respectively). There was no longitudinal evidence of a learning curve. Reasons for this low sensitivity are related to unfamiliarity with CHD, low incidence in small populations, and inadequate evaluation of the fetal heart. These problems can be resolved with continued training and direction from a major center.
PubMed ID
8915930 View in PubMed
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[Evaluation of abnormal myocardial wall motions in patients with univentricular heart by tissue Doppler echocardiography]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30989
Source
Z Kardiol. 2003 Apr;92(4):319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
H. Abdul-Khaliq
B. Schmitt
A. Rentzsch
A. Helweg
M. Gutberlet
M. Yegitbasi
J H Nürnberg
V. Alexi-Meskhishvili
R. Hetzer
P E Lange
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Angeborene Herzfehler und Kinderkardiologie, Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany. Abdul-Khaliq@dhzb.de
Source
Z Kardiol. 2003 Apr;92(4):319-25
Date
Apr-2003
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diastole - physiology
Echocardiography, Doppler
English Abstract
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Heart Rate - physiology
Heart Ventricles - abnormalities - surgery - ultrasonography
Humans
Male
Myocardial Contraction - physiology
Postoperative Complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Systole - physiology
Tricuspid Atresia - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Assessment of systolic and diastolic ventricular function in children and adults with morphologically and functionally univentricular heart is difficult using the conventional echocardiographic methods. Quantitative assessment of systolic and diastolic wall motion by TDE may provide information on abnormal systolic and diastolic ventricular function. Thus, the object of this study was to analyze the patterns of anterior and posterior wall motions in children with univentricular heart after palliative Fontan operation in comparison to normal subjects. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We investigated 21 patients of an average age of 10.1 years (range 4.2 to 32 years) with the primary diagnosis of univentricular heart and tricuspid atresia after a median period of 4.3 (range 1.2 to 8) years after cavo-pulmonary anastomosis (Fontan procedure) and in comparison to a normal collective of children without cardiovascular malformations. For investigation we used the novel tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) (EchoPack 6.3.6, Vingmed, Norway). Thereby we chose the standardized apical view and evaluated the left and right annular systolic (S(T)), early diastolic (E(T)) and atrial (A(T)) motion. We also registered the acceleration and deceleration time of each obtained curve. RESULTS: In comparison to the posterior myocardial wall the velocities at the anterior wall of the rudimentary ventricle were significantly reduced in all patients with tricuspid atresia and univentricular heart (p
PubMed ID
12707791 View in PubMed
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Exercise capacity, physical activity, and health-related quality of life in adults with CHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306227
Source
Cardiol Young. 2020 May; 30(5):668-673
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2020
Author
Linda Ashman Kröönström
Åsa Cider
Anna-Klara Zetterström
Linda Johansson
Peter Eriksson
Lars Brudin
Mikael Dellborg
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Physical Therapy Department, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Cardiol Young. 2020 May; 30(5):668-673
Date
May-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance - physiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess exercise capacity, physical activity, and health-related quality of life within a broad and unselected group of adults with CHD.
From April 2009 to February 2014, 1310 patients were assessed for suitability to participate in this single-centre cross-sectional study. Seven hundred and forty-seven (57%) patients were included, performed a submaximal bicycle test, and answered questionnaires regarding physical activity and health-related quality of life. Exercise capacity, physical activity, and health-related quality of life were compared with reference values and correlations were studied.
The exercise capacities of men and women with CHD were 58.7 and 66.3%, respectively, of reference values. Approximately, 20-25% of the patients did not achieve the recommended amount of physical activity. In addition, men scored significantly less points on 7 out of 10 scales of health-related quality of life and women in 6 out of 10 scales, compared with reference values. The strongest correlation was between exercise capacity and the Short Form-36 (physical function).
Exercise capacity was impaired in all adults with CHD, including those with less complicated CHD. One-quarter of the patients did not achieve the recommended levels of physical activity. Exercise tests followed by individualised exercise prescriptions may be offered to all patients with CHD aiming to increase exercise capacity, levels of physical activity, improve health-related quality of life, and reduce the risk of acquired life-style diseases.
PubMed ID
32290878 View in PubMed
Less detail

Functional health status of adolescents after the Fontan procedure -- comparison with their siblings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148611
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Sep;25(9):e294-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Cedric Manlhiot
Stevan Knezevich
Elizabeth Radojewski
Geraldine Cullen-Dean
William G Williams
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Labatt Family Heart Centre, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Sep;25(9):e294-300
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fontan Procedure - rehabilitation
Health Status Indicators
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - psychology - surgery
Humans
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Ontario
Postoperative Period
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Siblings
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies have suggested that patients who have undergone the Fontan procedure experience lower functional health status and diminished exercise capacity compared with other children.
To compare the functional health status of Fontan patients with and without siblings, assess whether there are any differences between Fontan patients and their siblings, and determine associated factors.
A cross-sectional, single-centre, observational study was performed on Fontan patients 10 to 20 years of age, and their sibling closest in age, followed in a tertiary pediatric hospital. Functional health status was measured by the Child Health Questionnaire Child Form and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory.
A total of 68 patients and 38 siblings were enrolled. Patients with siblings scored significantly lower on numerous domains of physical functional status than those without siblings. Compared with their matched siblings, Fontan patients reported significantly lower scores in all domains of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory and on physical (but not psychosocial) domains of the Child Health Questionnaire Child Form. Factors associated with increased patient-sibling differences included younger patient age, female sex, intracardiac lateral tunnel Fontan connection and lower ejection fraction at the time of study enrollment.
Adolescents with Fontan physiology reported a lower functional health status in physical domains than their siblings, but had similar status in psychosocial domains. Having a sibling was associated with lower reported functional health status, suggesting an important effect of self-perceived physical limitations over true limitations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19746247 View in PubMed
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Indications, criterions, and principles for biventricular repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179258
Source
Cardiol Young. 2004 Feb;14 Suppl 1:97-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Christo I Tchervenkov
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, The Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, PQ, Canada. christo.tchervenkov@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Cardiol Young. 2004 Feb;14 Suppl 1:97-100
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - methods
Child
Heart Defects, Congenital - physiopathology - surgery
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Humans
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome - pathology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
15244148 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.