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[Angiocardiographic diagnosis of atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice and associated congenital heart defects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227934
Source
Grud Serdechnososudistaia Khir. 1990 Dec;(12):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
B G Alekian
S B Zaets
Source
Grud Serdechnososudistaia Khir. 1990 Dec;(12):45-9
Date
Dec-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Angiocardiography
Child
Child, Preschool
Heart Atria - radiography
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - radiography
Heart Ventricles - radiography
Humans
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
Ninety patients with atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice were examined. Their ages ranged from 3.5 to 24 years (9.9 +/- 0.5 years on the average). Stenosis of the pulmonary artery was found in 86 patients and was absent in 4 patients. Various intraarterial anastomoses had been established previously in 46 patients with stenosis of the pulmonary artery. All the patients were subjected to angiocardiographic examination including angiocardiography from the right and left parts of the heart and from the great vessels. Several anatomical variants of atresia of the right atrioventricular orifice and concomitant anomalies were studied. The following program of roentgeno-surgical examination in this complex congenital heart disease was elaborated. 1. Catheterization of the right and left parts of the heart and the great vessels. 2. Angiocardiography: right atriography; left ventriculography in anteroposterior, lateral, and, if indicated, axial views; aortography; pulmonary arteriography and, when indicated, right ventriculography.
PubMed ID
2150316 View in PubMed
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Annual trends in use of periconceptional folic acid and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108772
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Audrey-Ann Richard-Tremblay
Odile Sheehy
Anick Bérard
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Curr Drug Saf. 2013 Jul;8(3):153-61
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology - physiopathology
Databases, Factual
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities - epidemiology
Nervous System Malformations - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Treatment Outcome
Vitamin B Complex - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that periconceptional folic acid use could not only prevent neural tube defects but also other malformations. The objectives of this study were to assess trends in dispensed high dose periconceptional folic acid (5 mg) and birth prevalence of major congenital malformations.
The Quebec Pregnancy Registry, an administrative database with information on periconceptional prescribed medication and diagnostic codes was used to conduct this study. All pregnant women insured by the Quebec public drug plan between January 1(st) 1998 and December 31(st) 2008 were included. The exposure was defined as the use of high dose periconceptional folic acid 30 days before, and during the first 70 days of pregnancy. The outcome measured was the birth prevalence of major congenital malformations among live births.
We identified 152,392 pregnancies and babies. The annual prevalence of high dose periconceptional folic acid use increased from 0.17% to 0.80% (p
PubMed ID
23845112 View in PubMed
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Association between maternal chronic conditions and congenital heart defects: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112613
Source
Circulation. 2013 Aug 6;128(6):583-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-2013
Author
Shiliang Liu
K S Joseph
Sarka Lisonkova
Jocelyn Rouleau
Michiel Van den Hof
Reg Sauve
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada, Room 405A2, AL 8604A, 785 Carling Ave, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9. sliu@uottawa.ca
Source
Circulation. 2013 Aug 6;128(6):583-9
Date
Aug-6-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Connective Tissue Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy, Multiple - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study quantifies the association between maternal medical conditions/illnesses and congenital heart defects (CHDs) among infants.
We carried out a population-based study of all mother-infant pairs (n=2,278,838) in Canada (excluding Quebec) from 2002 to 2010 using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. CHDs among infants were classified phenotypically through a hierarchical grouping of International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Canada codes. Maternal conditions such as multifetal pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and congenital heart disease were defined by use of diagnosis codes. The association between maternal conditions and CHDs and its subtypes was modeled using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, residence, and other factors. There were 26 488 infants diagnosed with CHDs at birth or at rehospitalization in infancy; the overall CHD prevalence was 116.2 per 10,000 live births, of which the severe CHD rate was 22.3 per 10,000. Risk factors for CHD included maternal age =40 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.58), multifetal pregnancy (aOR, 4.53; 95% CI, 4.28-4.80), diabetes mellitus (type 1: aOR, 4.65; 95% CI, 4.13-5.24; type 2: aOR, 4.12; 95% CI, 3.69-4.60), hypertension (aOR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61-2.03), thyroid disorders (aOR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.26-1.67), congenital heart disease (aOR, 9.92; 95% CI, 8.36-11.8), systemic connective tissue disorders (aOR, 3.01; 95% CI, 2.23-4.06), and epilepsy and mood disorders (aOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16-1.72). Specific CHD subtypes were associated with different maternal risk factors.
Several chronic maternal medical conditions, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, connective tissue disorders, and congenital heart disease, confer an increased risk of CHD in the offspring.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Med. 2014 Apr;19(2):e824282172
PubMed ID
23812182 View in PubMed
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Birth defects surveillance: Jefferson County, Alabama, and Uppsala County, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54905
Source
South Med J. 1994 Apr;87(4):440-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
W H Finley
K H Gustavson
T M Hall
D C Hurst
C M Barganier
J A Wiedmeyer
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Medical Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham 35294.
Source
South Med J. 1994 Apr;87(4):440-5
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology
Alabama - epidemiology
Clubfoot - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Female
Genetic Counseling
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Hip Dislocation, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Polydactyly - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spinal Dysraphism - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Birth defects in live-born infants were documented for 2 years in Jefferson County, Alabama (USA)--1986 and 1987--and in Uppsala County, Sweden--1985 and 1986. A total of 27,561 live births (9,179 white male, 8,728 white female, 4,883 black male, and 4,771 black female infants) occurred in Jefferson County; 6,896 live births (3,535 male and 3,361 female) were recorded in Uppsala County. These newborns were studied to establish a database of birth defects for the two small geographic areas and to study similarities and differences. Rates of hip dislocation, heart malformations, and clubfoot were high in Swedish infants. Similar frequencies of spina bifida and polydactyly were noted in Alabama whites and Swedish infants. Regional registries offer a systematic approach to detection of clustering of specific birth defects, identification of families for further study, location of patients with unique needs, and enhanced coordination of health services, including genetic counseling.
PubMed ID
8153768 View in PubMed
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Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145363
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Mar;21(2):275-7; author reply 277
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010

Cancer risk among patients with congenital heart defects: a nationwide follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257685
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Feb;24(1):40-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Morten Olsen
Ester Garne
Claus Sværke
Lars Søndergaard
Henrik Nissen
Henrik Ø Andersen
Vibeke E Hjortdal
Søren P Johnsen
Jørgen Videbæk
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Cardiol Young. 2014 Feb;24(1):40-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Down Syndrome
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
We aimed to assess cancer risk in congenital heart defect patients, with and without Down's syndrome, compared with the general population.
We identified all patients born and diagnosed with congenital heart defects from 1977 to 2008 using the Danish National Registry of Patients, covering all Danish hospitals. We compared cancer incidence in the congenital heart defect cohort with that expected in the general population (~5.5 million) using the Danish Cancer Registry, and computed age- and gender-standardised incidence ratios.
We identified 15,905 congenital heart defect patients, contributing a total of 151,172 person-years at risk; the maximum length of follow-up was 31 years (median 8 years). In all, 53 patients were diagnosed with cancer, including 30 female and 23 male patients (standardised incidence ratio = 1.63; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-2.13). Risks were increased for leukaemia, brain tumours, and basal cell carcinoma. After excluding 801 patients with Down's syndrome, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.64). In the subgroup of 5660 non-Down's syndrome patients undergoing cardiac surgery or catheter-based interventions, the standardised incidence ratio was 1.45 (95% confidence interval: 0.86-2.29).
The overall risk of cancer among congenital heart defect patients without Down's syndrome was not statistically significantly elevated. Cancer risk in the congenital heart defect cohort as a whole, including patients with Down's syndrome, was increased compared with the general population, although the absolute risk was low. Studies with longer follow-up and more information on radiation doses are needed to further examine a potential cancer risk associated with diagnostic radiation exposure.
PubMed ID
23328503 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk in individuals with major birth defects: large Nordic population based case-control study among children, adolescents, and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304010
Source
BMJ. 2020 12 02; 371:m4060
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-02-2020
Author
Dagrun Slettebø Daltveit
Kari Klungsøyr
Anders Engeland
Anders Ekbom
Mika Gissler
Ingrid Glimelius
Tom Grotmol
Laura Madanat-Harjuoja
Anne Gulbech Ording
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit Sæther
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Rebecca Troisi
Tone Bjørge
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway dagrun.daltveit@uib.no.
Source
BMJ. 2020 12 02; 371:m4060
Date
12-02-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Bone Diseases, Developmental - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Aberrations
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Nervous System Malformations - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urogenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine associations between birth defects and cancer from birth into adulthood.
Population based nested case-control study.
Nationwide health registries in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden.
62?295 cancer cases (0-46 years) and 724?542 frequency matched controls (matched on country and birth year), born between 1967 and 2014.
Relative risk of cancer in relation to major birth defects, estimated as odds ratios with 99% confidence intervals from logistic regression models.
Altogether, 3.5% (2160/62?295) of cases and 2.2% (15?826/724?542) of controls were born with major birth defects. The odds ratio of cancer for people with major birth defects compared with those without was 1.74 (99% confidence interval 1.63 to 1.84). For individuals with non-chromosomal birth defects, the odds ratio of cancer was 1.54 (1.44 to 1.64); for those with chromosomal anomalies, the odds ratio was 5.53 (4.67 to 6.54). Many structural birth defects were associated with later cancer in the same organ system or anatomical location, such as defects of the eye, nervous system, and urinary organs. The odds ratio of cancer increased with number of defects and decreased with age, for both non-chromosomal and chromosomal anomalies. The odds ratio of cancer in people with any non-chromosomal birth defect was lower in adults (=20 years: 1.21, 1.09 to 1.33) than in adolescents (15-19 years: 1.58, 1.31 to 1.90) and children (0-14 years: 2.03, 1.85 to 2.23). The relative overall cancer risk among adults with chromosomal anomalies was markedly reduced from 11.3 (9.35 to 13.8) in children to 1.50 (1.01 to 2.24). Among adults, skeletal dysplasia (odds ratio 3.54, 1.54 to 8.15), nervous system defects (1.76, 1.16 to 2.65), chromosomal anomalies (1.50, 1.01 to 2.24), genital organs defects (1.43, 1.14 to 1.78), and congenital heart defects (1.28, 1.02 to 1.59) were associated with overall cancer risk.
The increased risk of cancer in individuals with birth defects persisted into adulthood, both for non-chromosomal and chromosomal anomalies. Further studies on the molecular mechanisms involved are warranted.
PubMed ID
33268348 View in PubMed
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Cardiac pathology in sudden unexpected infant death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188657
Source
J Pediatr. 2002 Sep;141(3):336-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Adrian Dancea
Aurore Côté
Charles Rohlicek
Chantal Bernard
Luc L Oligny
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Center, The Montreal Children's Hospital, Hôpital Ste-Justine, University of Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr. 2002 Sep;141(3):336-42
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autopsy
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology - pathology
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sudden Infant Death - etiology - pathology
Abstract
To determine the spectrum of cardiac pathology and circumstances of death in infants with sudden unexpected death and to define the impact of sudden cardiac deaths to overall sudden infant death.
Retrospective analysis of all autopsies of infants with sudden death 7 days to 2 years of age between January 1987 and December 1999 in the province of Québec (Canada).
Eighty-two cases of sudden death with cardiac pathology were found, representing 10% of the total number of sudden infant deaths. A structural malformation was present in the majority of cases (54%); however, cardiac pathology in anatomically normal hearts was also common (46%). Most (64%) anatomic malformations were detected before death compared with 13% of nonstructural heart disease. Although a major proportion of children were found dead during sleep, a significant number were described as being awake at time of death (32%).
Heart disease is present in a significant percentage of autopsies of infants with sudden death. Structural heart malformations predominate, although nonstructural pathologic features of the heart are common and usually unrecognized before an autopsy is performed. Cardiac pathologic features are frequent when the child is witnessed to be awake at the time of sudden death.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2002 Sep;141(3):303-512219047
PubMed ID
12219052 View in PubMed
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124 records – page 1 of 13.