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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):157
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
John A M Morphet
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 Feb;22(2):157
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Networks
Continuity of Patient Care
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Notes
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Nov 1;38(5):1587-811691551
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Jul;19(8):949; author reply 94912892096
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Aug;20(10):973-415332146
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1998 Aug;14(8):9979738156
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jan;21(1):99; author reply 99-10015751167
Comment On: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Aug;21(10):833-816107904
PubMed ID
16532578 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Catheterization in the care of congenital heart disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173974
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(11):1207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Source
Congenit Heart Dis. 2010 May-Jun;5(3):198-205
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gary Webb
Author Affiliation
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Heart Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA. gary.webb@cchmc.org
Source
Congenit Heart Dis. 2010 May-Jun;5(3):198-205
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiac Care Facilities - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Community Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Continuity of Patient Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Hospital Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Patient Care Planning - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Program Development
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Treatment Outcome
United States
Abstract
The care of adult patients with congenital heart defects in the United States is spotty at best, and needs to improve greatly if the needs of these patients are to be met. The care of American children with congenital heart defects is generally excellent. Pediatric cardiac services are well established and well supported. The care of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) is well established in only a few American centers. While there are an increasing number of clinics, they are generally poorly resourced with relatively few patients. If located in adult cardiology programs, they are usually minor players. If located in pediatric cardiac programs, they are usually minor players as well. Training programs for adult CHD (ACHD) caregivers are few, informal, and poorly funded. To improve the situation, we need perhaps 25 well-resourced and well-established regional ACHD centers in the United States. We need to stop the loss to care of CHD patients at risk of poor outcomes. We need to educate patients and families about the need for lifelong and skilled surveillance and care. We need to effect an orderly transfer from pediatric to adult care. We need to strengthen the human resource infrastructure of ACHD care through the training and hiring of healthcare professionals of a quality equivalent to those working in the pediatric care environment. We need to demonstrate that adult care is high quality care. We need more high-quality ACHD research. The ACHD community needs to establish its credibility with pediatric cardiac providers, adult cardiology groups, with governments, with professional organizations, and with research funding agencies. Accordingly, there is a need for strong political action on behalf of American ACHD patients. This must be led by patients and families. These efforts should be supported by pediatric cardiologists and children's hospitals, as well as by national professional organizations, governments, and health insurance companies. The goal of this political action should be to see that ACHD patients can receive high-quality lifelong surveillance, that we lose fewer patients to care, and that the staff and other services needed are available nationwide.
Notes
Comment In: Congenit Heart Dis. 2010 May-Jun;5(3):206-720576039
PubMed ID
20576038 View in PubMed
Less detail

Presentation, diagnosis, and medical management of heart failure in children: Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106003
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Paul F Kantor
Jane Lougheed
Adrian Dancea
Michael McGillion
Nicole Barbosa
Carol Chan
Rejane Dillenburg
Joseph Atallah
Holger Buchholz
Catherine Chant-Gambacort
Jennifer Conway
Letizia Gardin
Kristen George
Steven Greenway
Derek G Human
Aamir Jeewa
Jack F Price
Robert D Ross
S Lucy Roche
Lindsay Ryerson
Reeni Soni
Judith Wilson
Kenny Wong
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: paul.kantor@albertahealthservices.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1535-52
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Algorithms
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers - therapeutic use
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia - complications - diagnosis
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Cardiomyopathies - complications - diagnosis
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Catecholamines - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - etiology - prevention & control
Diagnosis, Differential
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Evidence-Based Medicine
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Heart Failure - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - etiology
Humans
Infant
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocarditis - complications - diagnosis
Myocardium - pathology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Vasodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Vasopressins - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
Pediatric heart failure (HF) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. This article presents guidelines for the recognition, diagnosis, and early medical management of HF in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The guidelines are intended to assist practitioners in office-based or emergency room practice, who encounter children with undiagnosed heart disease and symptoms of possible HF, rather than those who have already received surgical palliation. The guidelines have been developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and are accompanied by practical Recommendations for their application in the clinical setting, supplemented by online material. This work does not include Recommendations for advanced management involving ventricular assist devices, or other device therapies.
PubMed ID
24267800 View in PubMed
Less detail

Should pulse oximetry be used to screen for congenital heart disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77993
Source
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2007 May;92(3):F219-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Valmari Pekka
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, PO Box 8041, 96101 Rovaniemi, Finland. pekka.valmari@lshp.fi
Source
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2007 May;92(3):F219-24
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Neonatal Screening - instrumentation - methods - standards
Oximetry - instrumentation - methods - standards
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Ten studies (44 969 newborns, 71 severe defects) evaluating the usefulness of neonatal pulse oximetry (PO) screening in timely detection of congenital heart disease (CHD) were reviewed. PO showed a high specificity (99.9-99.99%), and the overall rate of detection of 15 individual defects with PO was 72% (range 46-100%), exceeding that of the clinical examination 58% (9-86%). Similar results were obtained for cyanotic CHD (89% v 69%, respectively). Without PO, discharge of apparently healthy infants with unknown CHD was 5.5 times and 4.1 times more likely in cyanotic CHD and all serious CHD, respectively. The paper describes the technical and practical details of first day and later screening. Diagnosis is reached earliest with first day screening, but it requires more resources. PO screening is not sensitive enough to serve as an independent screen, but along with the clinical examination it helps minimise the morbidity and mortality associated with discharge without diagnosis. Further research is needed for precise delineation of populations that would benefit from PO screening.
PubMed ID
17449857 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.