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[Adults with congenital heart defects--a growing patient group]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53889
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 14;98(7):656-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2001
Author
U. Thilén
Author Affiliation
Hjärt-lungdivisionen, Universitetssjukhuset i Lund. Ulf.Thilen@kard.lu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Feb 14;98(7):656-60
Date
Feb-14-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - diagnosis
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The number of grown ups with congenital heart disease (GUCH) increases due to the success story of pediatric cardiology and heart surgery. However, late complications such as arrhythmia, endocarditis and heart failure are common, as are patients requiring reoperation/catheter intervention. In some categories of congenital heart disease, pregnancy may pose a substantial threat. Early information about this is essential. The care of these patients, including heart surgery, should be centralized. A registry of GUCH-patients has been created in Sweden, promoting experience and knowledge concerning a "new" and expanding group of patients in cardiology.
PubMed ID
11475253 View in PubMed
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Anesthesia-related cardiac arrest in children with heart disease: data from the Pediatric Perioperative Cardiac Arrest (POCA) registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145823
Source
Anesth Analg. 2010 May 1;110(5):1376-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2010
Author
Chandra Ramamoorthy
Charles M Haberkern
Sanjay M Bhananker
Karen B Domino
Karen L Posner
John S Campos
Jeffrey P Morray
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology,S tanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Anesth Analg. 2010 May 1;110(5):1376-82
Date
May-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anesthesia - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Emergency medical services
Female
Heart Arrest - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - epidemiology
Heart Diseases - complications
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intraoperative Complications - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Perioperative Care
Registries
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
From 1994 to 2005, the Pediatric Perioperative Cardiac Arrest Registry collected data on 373 anesthesia-related cardiac arrests (CAs) in children, 34% of whom had congenital or acquired heart disease (HD).
Nearly 80 North American institutions that provide anesthesia for children voluntarily enrolled in the Pediatric Perioperative Cardiac Arrest Registry. A standardized data form for each perioperative CA in children 18 years old or younger was submitted anonymously. We analyzed causes of and outcomes from anesthesia-related CA in children with and without HD.
Compared with the 245 children without HD, the 127 children with HD who arrested were sicker (92% vs 62% ASA physical status III-V; P
Notes
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2010 May 1;110(5):1255-620418286
PubMed ID
20103543 View in PubMed
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Source
Pediatr Radiol. 2008 Dec;38(12):1353
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Kondrachuk Oleksandr
Yemets Illya
Author Affiliation
Cardiac Radiology Department, Ukrainian Children's Cardiac Center, Chornovola Street 28/1, Kiev 01135, Ukraine. arvedui@mail.ru
Source
Pediatr Radiol. 2008 Dec;38(12):1353
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aorta - abnormalities - surgery
Diagnosis, Differential
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Heart Failure - etiology
Heart Ventricles - abnormalities - surgery
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Rare Diseases
Vascular Neoplasms - diagnosis
PubMed ID
18853151 View in PubMed
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Atrial arrhythmias in adult patients with right- versus left-sided congenital heart disease anomalies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141694
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2010 Aug 15;106(4):547-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2010
Author
Bernier M
Marelli AJ
Pilote L
Bouchardy J
Bottega N
Martucci G
Therrien J
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2010 Aug 15;106(4):547-51
Date
Aug-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Heart Atria
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Tachycardia, Supraventricular - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Atrial arrhythmias (AAs) are a common complication in adult patients with congenital heart disease. We sought to compare the lifetime prevalence of AAs in patients with right- versus left-sided congenital cardiac lesions and their effect on the prognosis. A congenital heart disease diagnosis was assigned using the International Disease Classification, Ninth Revision, diagnostic codes in the administrative databases of Quebec, from 1983 to 2005. Patients with AAs were those diagnosed with an International Disease Classification, Ninth Revision, code for atrial fibrillation or intra-atrial reentry tachycardia. To ensure that the diagnosis of AA was new, a washout period of 5 years after entry into the database was used, a period during which the patient could not have received an International Disease Classification, Ninth Revision, code for AA. The cumulative lifetime risk of AA was estimated using the Practical Incidence Estimators method. The hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality, morbidity, and cardiac interventions were compared between those with right- and left-sided lesions after adjustment for age, gender, disease severity, and cardiac risk factors. In a population of 71,467 patients, 7,756 adults developed AAs (isolated right-sided, 2,229; isolated left-sided, 1,725). The lifetime risk of developing AAs was significantly greater in patients with right- sided than in patients with left-sided lesions (61.0% vs 55.4%, p
PubMed ID
20691314 View in PubMed
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Bacterial endocarditis in children: trends in its diagnosis, course, and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36570
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 1992 Oct;13(4):198-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
D. Hansen
K. Schmiegelow
J R Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Pediatr Cardiol. 1992 Oct;13(4):198-203
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Endocarditis, Bacterial - diagnosis - etiology - mortality
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - mortality
Humans
Infant
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
In a population-based study of 41 children with bacterial endocarditis (BE), diagnosed in the period 1970 through 1989 in eastern Denmark, we analyzed trends in the diagnosis of BE and in mortality, and searched for possible prognostic factors. During this period the delay in diagnosis from first symptom to treatment did not change, but the delay from admission to treatment was significantly prolonged from 0 to 3 days, despite the introduction of echocardiography (ECHO). There was a significant improvement in the prognosis, the mortality rate having decreased from 40 to 0% [95% confidence limits: 12-74 vs. 0-26 (0.01 less than p less than 0.02)]. The improved prognosis was not explained by changes in the etiology or pattern of antibiotic resistance and may reflect a milder course of BE in children. Children with "mild anomalies"--such as bicuspid aortic valve (n = 5), coarctation of the aorta (n = 2), and prolapse of the mitral valve (n = 2)--had a significantly poorer prognosis than children with other forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) (p = 0.004), a reminder of the importance of suspecting BE in all children with unexplained long-lasting or intermittent fever, because some may have unrecognized "mild" CHD.
PubMed ID
1518737 View in PubMed
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Carmi syndrome with congenital heart defects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100523
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Aug;152A(8):2120-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Mustafa Aydin
Aysegul Zenciroglu
Ayhan Yaman
Utku Arman Orun
Nilufer Arda
Asuman Gurkan Colak
Nurullah Okumus
Mehmet Sah Ipek
Serdar Ceylaner
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology, Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. dr1mustafa@hotmail.com
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Aug;152A(8):2120-2
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Epidermolysis Bullosa - complications - pathology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - pathology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Syndrome
PubMed ID
20635364 View in PubMed
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Cerebrovascular accidents in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142083
Source
Heart. 2010 Aug;96(15):1223-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
A. Hoffmann
P. Chockalingam
O H Balint
A. Dadashev
K. Dimopoulos
R. Engel
M. Schmid
M. Schwerzmann
M A Gatzoulis
B. Mulder
E. Oechslin
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. andreas.hoffmann@unibas.ch
Source
Heart. 2010 Aug;96(15):1223-6
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in a large population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD).
In a retrospective analysis of aggregated European and Canadian databases a total population of 23 153 patients with CHD was followed up to the age of 16-91 years (mean 36.4 years). Among them, 458 patients (2.0%) had one or more CVA, with an estimated event rate of 0.05% per patient-year. Permanent neurological sequelae were noted in 116 patients (25.3%). The prevalence of CVA in selected diagnostic categories was as follows: open atrial septal defect 93/2351 (4.0%); closed atrial or ventricular septal defect 57/4035 (1.4%); corrected tetralogy of Fallot 52/2196 (2.4%); Eisenmenger physiology 24/467 (5.1%); other cyanotic 50/215 (23.3%); mechanical prostheses (29/882 (3.3%). Associated conditions in patients with CVA were absence of sinus rhythm (25%), transvenous pacemakers (7%), endocarditis (2%), cardiac surgery (11%) and catheter intervention (2%), but with the exception of absent sinus rhythm these were not significantly more prevalent in patients with CVA.
CVA are a major contributor to morbidity in this young population despite absence of classical cardiovascular risk factors. Although the prevalence of CVA in patients with CHD appears low, it is 10-100 times higher than expected in control populations of comparable age. Residua occur in a strong minority of patients. The subjects at highest risk are those patients with CHD with cyanotic lesions, in whom the prevalence is over 10-fold above the average.
PubMed ID
20639238 View in PubMed
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82 records – page 1 of 9.