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[100,000 Goteburgers will learn how to save lives. Interview by Jan Thomasson.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55687
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-7-1985
Author
M. Blohm
Source
Vardfacket. 1985 Mar 7;9(5):14-6
Date
Mar-7-1985
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Education - organization & administration
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Resuscitation - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
3849220 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute emergency service in Reykjavik]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55044
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):88-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
G. Thorgeirsson
Author Affiliation
Medicinska avdelningen, Borgarspítalinn, Reykjavik.
Source
Nord Med. 1993;108(3):88-9
Date
1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Education, Continuing
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - organization & administration
Emergency Medical Technicians - education
English Abstract
Female
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The cardiac arrest survival rate has improved since the emergency ambulance service manned by specially trained paramedical personnel and doctors was introduced in Iceland. As the response time has been reduced, specific resuscitation measures can be applied sooner.
PubMed ID
8455979 View in PubMed
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[Acute heart arrest; resuscitation attempts in an internal medicine department]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56493
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1965 Nov 1;85(21):1636-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-1965
Author
B. Knutsen
A. Ersland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1965 Nov 1;85(21):1636-40
Date
Nov-1-1965
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Norway
Resuscitation
PubMed ID
5882934 View in PubMed
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Adherence to resuscitation guidelines during prehospital care of cardiac arrest patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163594
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2007 Apr;14(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Hetti Kirves
Markus B Skrifvars
Marko Vähäkuopus
Kaj Ekström
Matti Martikainen
Maaret Castren
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Hospital, 00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. Hetti.Kirves@hus.fi
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2007 Apr;14(2):75-81
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Emergency Medical Services - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Resuscitation
Abstract
The impact of prehospital care after the return of spontaneous circulation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients is not known. This study describes adherence to the resuscitation guidelines, factors associated with poor adherence and possible impact of prehospital postresuscitation care on the outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
One hundred and fifty-seven Finnish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients hospitalized during 1 year, were analyzed retrospectively. Patient and arrest characteristics, prehospital postresuscitation care and survival to hospital discharge were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.
Forty percent of the patients received care accordant with the guidelines. Male sex (P=0.045), witnessed arrest (P=0.031), initial ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia rhythm (P=0.007) and the presence of an emergency physician (P=0.017) were associated with care in line with the current guidelines. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age over median (odds ratio=3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.5-8.6), nonventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia initial rhythm (odds ratio=4.0, 95% confidence interval 1.6-9.8), administration of adrenaline (odds ratio=7.0, 95% confidence interval 2.3-21.4) and unsatisfactory prehospital postresuscitation care (odds ratio=2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1-6.3) were associated with a failure to survive up to hospital discharge.
Less than 50% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients received prehospital postresuscitation care compatible with the current guidelines. Markers of poor prognosis were associated with unsatisfactory care, which in turn was more frequent among the patients who did not survive to hospital discharge. The importance of the guidelines should be highlighted in the future.
PubMed ID
17496680 View in PubMed
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Advanced cardiac life support before and after tracheal intubation--direct measurements of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76246
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jan;68(1):61-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Jo Kramer-Johansen
Lars Wik
Petter Andreas Steen
Author Affiliation
Institute for Experimental Medical Research, University of Oslo, Ulleval University Hospital, N-0407 OSLO, Norway. jo.kramer-johansen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jan;68(1):61-9
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Comparative Study
Emergency medical services
Heart Arrest - therapy
Heart Massage
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration
Abstract
STUDY HYPOTHESIS: Tracheal intubation should improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by enabling adequate ventilation without pauses in external chest compressions. METHODS: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of all causes were sampled in this non-randomized, observational study of advanced cardiac life support in three ambulance services (Akershus, London and Stockholm). Prototype defibrillators (Heartstart 4000SP, Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA and Laerdal Medical AS, Stavanger, Norway) registered all chest compressions via an extra chest pad with an accelerometer mounted over the lower part of sternum and ventilations from changes in transthoracic impedance between the standard defibrillator pads. The quality of CPR was analyzed off-line for 119 episodes. Numbers and differences are given as mean +/- S.D. and differences as mean and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Chest compressions were not given in cardiac arrest for 61 +/- 20% of the time before intubation compared to 41 +/- 18% after intubation (difference: 20% (16-24%)). Compressions and ventilations per minute increased from 47 +/- 25 to 71 +/- 23 (difference: 24 (19, 29)) and 5.6 +/- 3.7 to 14 +/- 5.0 (difference: 8.7 (7.6, 9.8)) respectively. Four cases of unrecognized oesophageal intubation (3%) were suspected from the disappearance of ventilation induced changes in thoracic impedance after intubation. CONCLUSION: The quality of CPR improved after tracheal intubation, but the fraction of time without blood flow was still high and not according to international guidelines. On-line analysis of thoracic impedance might be a practicable aid to avoid unrecognized oesophageal intubation, but this area needs further research.
PubMed ID
16325329 View in PubMed
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Adverse events associated with lay emergency response programs: the public access defibrillation trial experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168751
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Mary Ann Peberdy
Lois Van Ottingham
William J Groh
Jerris Hedges
Thomas E Terndrup
Ronald G Pirrallo
N Clay Mann
Ruchir Sehra
Author Affiliation
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 908204, Richmond, VA 23298, USA. mpeberdy@aol.com
Source
Resuscitation. 2006 Jul;70(1):59-65
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - adverse effects - education - psychology
Community Health Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Defibrillators - adverse effects
Electric Countershock - adverse effects
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
United States
Volunteers - education - psychology
Abstract
The adverse event (AE) profile of lay volunteer CPR and public access defibrillation (PAD) programs is unknown. We undertook to investigate the frequency, severity, and type of AE's occurring in widespread PAD implementation.
A randomized-controlled clinical trial.
One thousand two hundred and sixty public and residential facilities in the US and Canada.
On-site, volunteer, lay personnel trained in CPR only compared to CPR plus automated external defibrillators (AEDs).
Persons experiencing possible cardiac arrest receiving lay volunteer first response with CPR+AED compared with CPR alone.
An AE is defined as an event of significance that caused, or had the potential to cause, harm to a patient or volunteer, or a criminal act. AE data were collected prospectively.
Twenty thousand three hundred and ninety six lay volunteers were trained in either CPR or CPR+AED. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen AEDs were placed in units randomized to the AED arm. There were 26,389 exposure months. Only 36 AE's were reported. There were two patient-related AEs: both patients experienced rib fractures. There were seven volunteer-related AE's: one had a muscle pull, four experienced significant emotional distress and two reported pressure by their employee to participate. There were 27 AED-related AEs: 17 episodes of theft involving 20 devices, three involved AEDs that were placed in locations inaccessible to the volunteer, four AEDs had mechanical problems not affecting patient safety, and three devices were improperly maintained by the facility. There were no inappropriate shocks and no failures to shock when indicated (95% upper bound for probability of inappropriate shock or failure to shock = 0.0012).
AED use following widespread training of lay-persons in CPR and AED is generally safe for the volunteer and the patient. Lay volunteers may report significant, usually transient, emotional stress following response to a potential cardiac arrest. Within the context of this prospective, randomized multi-center study, AEDs have an exceptionally high safety profile when used by trained lay responders.
PubMed ID
16784998 View in PubMed
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[AED (automatic external defibrillators) are coming!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53580
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Mar 3;165(10):1007
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2003
Author
Freddy K Lippert
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Mar 3;165(10):1007
Date
Mar-3-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Electric Countershock - instrumentation
Emergency Treatment
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Practice Guidelines
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Mar 3;165(10):1009-1212645404
PubMed ID
12645403 View in PubMed
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[After ship's accident--physician on duty made wrong decision about ambulance]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54414
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1998 Jan 30;98(5):6-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1998
Author
J. Berg
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1998 Jan 30;98(5):6-7
Date
Jan-30-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adult
Ambulances
Denmark
Emergency medical services
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Male
Ships
PubMed ID
9528599 View in PubMed
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Age as a determinant of cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome in the coronary care unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214983
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):634-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
C. Brymer
E. Gangbar
K. O'Rourke
G. Naglie
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1995 Jun;43(6):634-7
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Female
Heart Arrest - therapy
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Discharge
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Tachycardia, Ventricular - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine whether age is associated with the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the coronary care unit (CCU).
Retrospective chart review.
The coronary care units of two Canadian tertiary care teaching hospitals.
Two hundred sixty-four coronary care unit patients undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation between January 1, 1985 and June 30, 1992.
There was no significant difference in survival to discharge after CPR between patients less than 70 years of age (17.0%) and patients 70 years of age and older (17.2%) (odds ratio = 0.99; 95% confidence interval = 0.46, 1.80). Patients 70 years of age and older who survived to discharge after CPR had significantly greater lengths of stay (28.1 vs 19.3 days, P = .008).
Age was not associated with a difference in survival to discharge after CPR in the CCU, although a clinically significant difference could not be excluded because of limited power.
PubMed ID
7775721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway management in cardiac arrest--comparison of the laryngeal tube, tracheal intubation and bag-valve mask ventilation in emergency medical training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180185
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
J. Kurola
H. Harve
T. Kettunen
J-P Laakso
J. Gorski
H. Paakkonen
T. Silfvast
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FIN-70210 Kuopio, Finland. jouni.kurola@kuh.fi
Source
Resuscitation. 2004 May;61(2):149-53
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Airway Resistance
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Clinical Competence
Education, Professional
Emergency medical services
Emergency Medical Technicians - education
Female
Finland
Heart Arrest - therapy
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal
Laryngeal Masks
Male
Probability
Quality Control
Respiration, Artificial - methods
Abstract
Tracheal intubation (ETI) is considered the method of choice for securing the airway and for providing effective ventilation during cardiac arrest. However, ETI requires skills which are difficult to maintain especially if practised infrequently. The laryngeal tube (LT) has been successfully tested and used in anaesthesia and in simulated cardiac arrest in manikins. To compare the initiation and success of ventilation with the LT, ETI and bag-valve mask (BVM) in a cardiac arrest scenario, 60 fire-fighter emergency medical technician (EMT) students formed teams of two rescuers at random and were allocated to use these devices. We found that the teams using the LT were able to initiate ventilation more rapidly than those performing ETI (P
PubMed ID
15135191 View in PubMed
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142 records – page 1 of 15.