Skip header and navigation

Refine By

132 records – page 1 of 14.

18F-FDG PET imaging of myocardial viability in an experienced center with access to 18F-FDG and integration with clinical management teams: the Ottawa-FIVE substudy of the PARR 2 trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144812
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Arun Abraham
Graham Nichol
Kathryn A Williams
Ann Guo
Robert A deKemp
Linda Garrard
Ross A Davies
Lloyd Duchesne
Haissam Haddad
Benjamin Chow
Jean DaSilva
Rob S B Beanlands
Author Affiliation
National Cardiac PET Centre and Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Heart - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Heart Failure - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Patient care team
Positron-Emission Tomography
Professional Competence
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Survival Analysis
Tissue Survival
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Abstract
(18)F-FDG PET may assist decision making in ischemic cardiomyopathy. The PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR 2) trial demonstrated a trend toward beneficial outcomes with PET-assisted management. The substudy of PARR 2 that we call Ottawa-FIVE, described here, was a post hoc analysis to determine the benefit of PET in a center with experience, ready access to (18)F-FDG, and integration with clinical teams.
Included were patients with left ventricular dysfunction and suspected coronary artery disease being considered for revascularization. The patients had been randomized in PARR 2 to PET-assisted management (group 1) or standard care (group 2) and had been enrolled in Ottawa after August 1, 2002 (the date that on-site (18)F-FDG was initiated) (n = 111). The primary outcome was the composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or cardiac rehospitalization within 1 y. Data were compared with the rest of PARR 2 (PET-assisted management [group 3] or standard care [group 4]).
In the Ottawa-FIVE subgroup of PARR 2, the cumulative proportion of patients experiencing the composite event was 19% (group 1), versus 41% (group 2). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression showed a benefit for the PET-assisted strategy (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.72; P = 0.005). Compared with other patients in PARR 2, Ottawa-FIVE patients had a lower ejection fraction (25% +/- 7% vs. 27% +/- 8%, P = 0.04), were more often female (24% vs. 13%, P = 0.006), tended to be older (64 +/- 10 y vs. 62 +/- 10 y, P = 0.07), and had less previous coronary artery bypass grafting (13% vs. 21%, P = 0.07). For patients in the rest of PARR 2, there was no significant difference in events between groups 3 and 4. The observed effect of (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management in the 4 groups in the context of adjusted survival curves demonstrated a significant interaction (P = 0.016). Comparisons of the 2 arms in Ottawa-FIVE to the 2 arms in the rest of PARR 2 demonstrated a trend toward significance (standard care, P = 0.145; PET-assisted management, P = 0.057).
In this post hoc group analysis, a significant reduction in cardiac events was observed in patients with (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management, compared with patients who received standard care. The results suggest that outcome may be benefited using (18)F-FDG PET in an experienced center with ready access to (18)F-FDG and integration with imaging, heart failure, and revascularization teams.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):505-620237024
PubMed ID
20237039 View in PubMed
Less detail

Activation of type II cannabinoid receptors improves myocardial tolerance to arrhythmogenic effects of coronary occlusion and reperfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53855
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2001 Jun;131(6):523-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
A V Krylatov
D S Ugdyzhekova
N A Bernatskaya
L N Maslov
R. Mekhoulam
R G Pertwee
G B Stephano
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cardiology, Tomsk Scientific Center, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences.
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2001 Jun;131(6):523-5
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Cannabinoids - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Coronary Disease - physiopathology
Heart - physiopathology
Myocardial Reperfusion
Myocardial Reperfusion Injury - drug therapy - physiopathology
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Receptors, Cannabinoid
Receptors, Drug - agonists - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tetrahydrocannabinol - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Preliminary intravenous injection of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-210 (0.05 mg/kg) reduced the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias during 10-min coronary occlusion and 10-min reperfusion in chloralose-anesthetized rats. Preliminary injection of type I cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A (3 mg/kg) had no effect on the antiarrhythmic effect of HU-210, while type II cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 144528 (1 mg/kg) completely abolished the effect of HU-210. Preconditioning with glibenclamide (0.3 mg/kg), an inhibitor of ATP-dependent K(+)-channels, did not affect the antiarrhythmic activity of HU-210. These findings suggest that antiarrhythmic effect of HU-210 is mediated through activation of type II cannabinoid receptors rather than activation of K(+)-channels.
PubMed ID
11586395 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function after pneumonectomy: results of the pneumonectomy project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138536
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Jean Deslauriers
Paula Ugalde
Santiago Miro
Sylvie Ferland
Sébastien Bergeron
Yves Lacasse
Steve Provencher
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec, Canada. jean.deslauriers@chg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Atrial Function, Right
Blood pressure
Chi-Square Distribution
Dyspnea - etiology - physiopathology
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Heart - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - etiology - physiopathology
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung - physiopathology - surgery
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Pulmonary Artery - physiopathology
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To assess lung function, gas exchange, exercise capacity, and right-sided heart hemodynamics, including pulmonary artery pressure, in patients long term after pneumonectomy.
Among 523 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer between January 1992 and September 2001, 117 were alive in 2006 and 100 were included in the study. During a 1-day period, each patient had complete medical history, chest radiographs, pulmonary function studies, resting arterial blood gas analysis, 6-minute walk test, and Doppler echocardiography.
Most patients (N = 73) had no or only minimal dyspnea. On the basis of predicted values, functional losses in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were 38% ± 18% and 31% ± 24%, respectively, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity decreased by 31% ± 18%. There was a significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P
PubMed ID
21168011 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-associated changes in hearts of male Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79665
Source
Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2006;36(4):427-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Walker Ernest M
Nillas Michael S
Mangiarua Elsa I
Cansino Sylvestre
Morrison Ryan G
Perdue Romaine R
Triest William E
Wright Gary L
Studeny Mark
Wehner Paulette
Rice Kevin M
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Joan C Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25704, USA. walkere@marshall.edu
Source
Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2006;36(4):427-38
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Arrhythmia - pathology - physiopathology
Disease Models, Animal
Echocardiography - methods
Heart - physiopathology
Heart Diseases - pathology - physiopathology
Heart Ventricles - pathology - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - pathology - physiopathology
Male
Myocardium - pathology
Organ Size
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - pathology - physiopathology
Abstract
Aging is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy, dilatation, and fibrosis of the heart. The Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 (F344/BNF1) rat is recommended for age-related studies by the National Institutes on Aging because this hybrid rat lives longer and has a lower rate of pathological conditions than inbred rats. However, little is known about age-associated changes in cardiac and aortic function and structure in this model. This study evaluated age-related cardiac changes in male F344/BNF1 rats using ECHO, gross, and microscopic examinations. Rats aged 6-, 30-, and 36-mo were anesthetized and two-dimensional ECHO measurements, two-dimensional guided M-mode, Doppler M-mode, and other recordings from parasternal long- and short-axis views were obtained using a Phillips 5500 ECHO system with a 12 megahertz transducer. Hearts and aortas from sacrificed rats were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The ECHO studies revealed persistent cardiac arrhythmias (chiefly PVCs) in 72% (13/18) of 36-mo rats, 10% (1/10) of 30-mo rats, and none in 6-mo rats (0/16). Gross and microscopic studies showed left ventricular (LV) dilatation, borderline to mild hypertrophy, and areas of fibrosis that were common in 36-mo rats, less evident in 30-mo rats, and absent in 6-mo rats. Aging was associated with mild to moderate decreases of LV diastolic and systolic function. Thus, male F344/BN F1 rats demonstrated progressive age-related (a) decline in cardiac function (diastolic and systolic indices), (b) LV structural changes (chamber dimensions, volumes, and wall thicknesses), and (c) persistent arrhythmias. These changes are consistent with those in humans. The noninvasive ECHO technique offers a means to monitor serial age-related cardiac failure and therapeutic responses in the same rats over designated time intervals.
PubMed ID
17127729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aged rat myocardium exhibits normal adenosine receptor-mediated bradycardia and coronary vasodilation but increased adenosine agonist-mediated cardioprotection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53062
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2005 Nov;60(11):1399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Gentian Kristo
Yukihiro Yoshimura
Byron J Keith
Robert M Mentzer
Robert D Lasley
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536-0298, USA.
Source
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2005 Nov;60(11):1399-404
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Bradycardia - physiopathology
Cardiotonic Agents - pharmacology
Heart - physiopathology
Imidazoles - pharmacology
In Vitro
Male
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Myocardium - metabolism
Pyridines - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Receptors, Purinergic P1 - agonists - physiology
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Vasodilation - physiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine whether aged myocardium exhibits decreased responsiveness to adenosine A1 and A(2a) receptor activation. Studies were conducted in adult (4-6 months) and aged (24-26 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway hybrid (F344 x BN) rats. Effects of the adenosine A1/A(2a) agonist AMP579 were measured in isolated hearts and in rats submitted to in vivo regional myocardial ischemia. Aged isolated hearts exhibited lower spontaneous heart rates and higher coronary resistance, as well as normal A1- and A(2a)-mediated responses. There was no difference in control infarct size between adult and aged rats; however, AMP579 treatment resulted in a 50% greater infarct size reduction in aged rats (18 +/- 4% of risk area) compared to adult rats (37 +/- 3%). These findings suggest that adenosine A1 and A(2a) receptor-mediated effects are not diminished in normal aged myocardium, and that aged hearts exhibit increased adenosine agonist-induced infarct reduction.
PubMed ID
16339325 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age factors in changes in the electric activity of the myocardium in ischemic heart disease]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56338
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1971 Sep-Oct;17(5):686-90
Publication Type
Article

[Age peculiarities in changes in the electromechanic activity of the heart in disturbance of coronary circulation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56377
Source
Fiziol Zh. 1970 Sep-Oct;16(5):676-9
Publication Type
Article

Aging influences multiple indices of oxidative stress in the heart of the Fischer 344/NNia x Brown Norway/BiNia rat.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83665
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Asano Shinichi
Rice Kevin M
Kakarla Sunil
Katta Anjaiah
Desai Devashish H
Walker Ernest M
Wehner Paulette
Blough Eric R
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia 25755-1090, USA.
Source
Redox Rep. 2007;12(4):167-80
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Aldehydes - metabolism
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Blood Pressure - physiology
Female
Heart - physiopathology
Heat-Shock Proteins - metabolism
Immunoblotting
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases - metabolism
Myocardium - metabolism - pathology
Oxidative Stress
Phosphorylation
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2 - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Regression Analysis
Signal Transduction - physiology
Superoxides - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
We report the influence of aging on multiple markers of oxidative-nitrosative stress in the heart of adult (6-month), aged (30-month) and very aged (36-month) Fischer 344/NNiaHSd x Brown Norway/BiNia (F344/NXBN) rats. Compared to adult (6-month) hearts, indices of oxidative (superoxide anion [O2*-], 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE]) and nitrosative (protein nitrotyrosylation) stress were 34.1 +/- 28.1%, 186 +/- 28.1% and 94 +/- 5.8% higher, respectively, in 36-month hearts and these findings were highly correlated with increases in left ventricular wall thickness (r > 0.669; r > 0.710 and P
PubMed ID
17705987 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of intrapartum fetal deaths: their decline with increasing electronic fetal monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241160
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(5):459-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
R. Erkkola
M. Grönroos
R. Punnonen
P. Kilkku
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(5):459-62
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Weight
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Fetal Heart - physiopathology
Fetal Monitoring
Finland
Heart rate
Humans
Labor, Obstetric
Pregnancy
Abstract
Over a 12-year period, from 1970 to 1981, 30 600 babies were born at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. During that period, the use of electronic fetal monitoring increased remarkably, being involved in 9, 12, 33 and 95% of all vaginal deliveries during four consecutive 3-year periods. The number of intrapartum deaths during the same 12-year period was 52, giving an overall rate of 1.7 per thousand. When 15 lethally malformed infants are excluded, the rate becomes 1.2 per thousand. In the four consecutive 3-year periods, the death rates were 1.7, 1.9, 1.0 and 0.3 per thousand. Electronic fetal monitoring was not undertaken in any of the cases leading to fetal death. The main factor leading to fetal death could be considered to be hypoxia in approximately 90% of the deaths of normally formed babies. The most common reasons for hypoxia were placental abruption and cord entanglement, yet in many cases only the decreased placental perfusion could be suggested to have caused the hypoxia. The mean weight of those babies that died intrapartally decreased significantly, being approximately 1 250 g during the last 3-year period.
PubMed ID
6496047 View in PubMed
Less detail

Autonomic nervous system and cardiac involvement in familial amyloidosis, Finnish type (FAF).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217244
Source
J Neurol Sci. 1994 Oct;126(1):40-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
S. Kiuru
E. Matikainen
M. Kupari
M. Haltia
J. Palo
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Neurol Sci. 1994 Oct;126(1):40-8
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyloidosis - complications - genetics - pathology - physiopathology
Autonomic Nervous System - pathology - physiopathology
Echocardiography
Female
Finland
Gelsolin - genetics
Heart - physiopathology
Heart rate
Humans
Hypotension, Orthostatic - etiology
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Myocardium - pathology
Point Mutation
Reflex, Abnormal
Valsalva Maneuver
Abstract
Familial amyloidosis, Finnish type (FAF), is a gelsolin-related inherited systemic amyloidosis. We report autonomic nervous system and cardiac findings in a study of 30 FAF patients (18 females, 12 males aged 27-74 years; mean 53.9 years). Cardiovascular reflex tests showed a significant decrease in heart rate variation in FAF patients compared with healthy controls. Orthostatic hypotension was found in 9 of 28 FAF patients, but only in 3 of 69 controls. Signs of amyloid cardiopathy were rare at clinical examination and in radio-, echocardio- and electrocardiographic examinations. Histological and immunohistochemical studies revealed amyloid deposition and immunoreactivity against the gelsolin-related FAF amyloid subunit in autonomic nervous system structures and in cardiac tissue in 3 autopsied FAF patients. The results show that minor autonomic nervous system dysfunction can be found in FAF, while clinically significant amyloid cardiopathy or autonomic neuropathy is not characteristic of this type of amyloidosis.
PubMed ID
7836945 View in PubMed
Less detail

132 records – page 1 of 14.