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39 records – page 1 of 4.

The 6 kHz acoustic dip in school-aged children in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216259
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
J. Haapaniemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University Central Hospital of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):391-4
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Auditory Threshold
Birth weight
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, High-Frequency - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Measles - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In the present study, pure-tone audiometry was used in 687 Finnish school children, aged 6-15 years, to determine the prevalence of a 6 kHz acoustic dip and related factors among three age groups. Trained audiometricians tested air conduction thresholds in a sound-proof room. A total of 57 children (8.3%) had a clear-cut dip of at least 20 dB at 6 kHz. This dip was more pronounced in older children and in boys. A thorough case history was obtained by questionnaire, with logistic regression analysis showing that low birth weight (
PubMed ID
8562032 View in PubMed
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The A1555G mtDNA mutation in Danish hearing-impaired patients: frequency and clinical signs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31346
Source
Clin Genet. 2002 Oct;62(4):303-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
E. ØStergaard
B. Montserrat-Sentis
K. Grønskov
K. Brøndum-Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, The John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup, Denmark. els@kennedy.dk
Source
Clin Genet. 2002 Oct;62(4):303-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology
Genetic Screening
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Point Mutation
Abstract
The A1555G mutation of the mtDNA is associated with both aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss. The A1555G is relatively frequent in the Spanish and some Asian populations, but has only been reported rarely in other populations, possibly because of ascertainment bias. We studied 85 Danish patients with varying degrees of hearing impairment and found two patients with the A1555G mutation (2.4%). Neither had received aminoglycosides. Our study indicates that the mutation might not be uncommon in Danish patients with hearing impairment.
PubMed ID
12372057 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of hearing losses in the workers of a shipyard and in loggers in relation to individual risk factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103534
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J. Pekkarinen
J. Starck
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1990;(10):15-8
Date
1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ear Protective Devices
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Risk factors
Ships
Wood
Abstract
It is suggested that, within the same energy level, an impulse noise is more hazardous to hearing than a permanent noise. To justify this hypothesis, a study was performed with groups of wood-cutters and shipyard workers to investigate different characteristics of noise load (noise levels, noise impulsivity from the outside and under the ear-flaps, noise emission levels with regard to the length of work and using ear-flaps), and hearing losses (both real and forecasted on the Robinson model). To avoid individual factors, a computerized assessment of 38 pairs of workers from both teams was performed (with regard to similar noise emission levels, diastolic pressures, smoking habits, their military service backgrounds as to the service in heavy artillery units, absence of otic diseases, low consumption of salicylates). The results showed that, within the same energy level, the noise in the shipyard was three times as impulsive and more otic disorders inducing than the noise in the wood-cutters' working conditions.
PubMed ID
2276660 View in PubMed
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Atherogenic risk factors and hearing thresholds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264844
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Thomas Winther Frederiksen
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Zara Ann Stokholm
Matias Brødsgaard Grynderup
Åse Marie Hansen
Søren Peter Lund
Jesper Medom Vestergaard
Jesper Kristiansen
Jens Peter Bonde
Henrik Albert Kolstad
Source
Audiol Neurootol. 2014;19(5):310-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Auditory Threshold - physiology
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - metabolism
Female
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - physiopathology
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from children's day care units, financial services and 10 manufacturing trades. Associations between atherogenic risk factors (blood lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI), and ambulatory blood pressure) and hearing thresholds were analyzed using multiple linear regression models. Adjusted results suggested associations between smoking, high BMI and triglyceride level and low high-density lipoprotein level and increased low-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 0.25, 0.5 and 1 kHz). Furthermore, an increasing load of atherogenic risk factors seemed associated with increased low-frequency hearing thresholds, but only at a borderline level of statistical significance. Associations were generally strongest with hearing levels of the worst hearing ear. We found no statistically significant associations between atherogenic risk factors and high-frequency hearing thresholds (average of pure-tone hearing thresholds at 4, 6 and 8 kHz).
PubMed ID
25300307 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123873
Source
Auris Nasus Larynx. 2013 Feb;40(1):41-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Reza Zarenoe
Torbjörn Ledin
Author Affiliation
Division of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Auris Nasus Larynx. 2013 Feb;40(1):41-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Cohort Studies
Electronystagmography - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hearing Aids - statistics & numerical data
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Tinnitus - epidemiology
Abstract
We aimed to describe a large cohort of patients with tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in Sweden, and also to explore the possibility of finding potential possible differences between various diagnoses within SNHL. It is also of great interest to see how a multidisciplinary team was used in the different subgroups and the frequency of hearing aids use in patients with tinnitus.
Medical records of all patients who had received the diagnosis SNHL in Östergötland County, Sweden between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed. Patients between 20 and 80 years with tinnitus and a pure tone average (PTA) lower than 70dB HL were included in the study. Patients were excluded from the analyses if they had a cochlear implantation, middle ear disorders or had a hearing loss since birth or childhood. The investigators completed a form for each included patient, covering background facts, and audiograms taken at the yearly check up.
Of a total 1672 patients' medical record review, 714 patients were included. The majority of patients (79%) were in the age group over 50 years. In male patients with bilateral tinnitus, the PTA for the left ear was significantly higher than for the right ear. The results regarding the configuration of hearing loss revealed that 555 patients (78%) had symmetric and 159 (22%) asymmetric hearing loss. Retrocochlear examinations were done in 372 patients and MRI was the most common examination. In all patients, 400 had no hearing aids and out of those 220 had unilateral tinnitus and 180 patients had bilateral tinnitus. 219 patients had a PTA>20dB HL and did not have any hearing aid. Results demonstrated that the Stepped Care model was not used widely in the daily practice. In our study, patients with bilateral-, unilateral hearing loss or Mb Ménière were the most common patients included in the Stepped Care model.
In a large cohort of patients with SNHL and tinnitus, despite their hearing loss only 39% had hearing aids. It was observed that the medical record review often showed a lack of information about many background factors, such as; patients' general health condition, which could be a quality factor that needs improvement. Our results show that the Stepped Care model could be an effective option for providing a better access for tinnitus-focused treatment, although the number of patients in this study who were included in the Stepped Care model was low.
PubMed ID
22652486 View in PubMed
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[Connexin gene 26 (GJB2) mutations in patients with hereditary non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91252
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2008;(5):23-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Barashkov N A
Dzhemileva L U
Fedorova S A
Maksimova N R
Khusnutdinova E K
Source
Vestn Otorinolaringol. 2008;(5):23-8
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Connexins - genetics - metabolism
DNA - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Male
Mutation
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Prevalence
Siberia - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to elucidate the causes of hereditary non-syndromic loss of hearing, a frequent monogene pathology in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia). A search for mutations in the coding sequence of the connexin 26 gene gap-junction B2 (GJB2) was undertaken in 79 members of 65 unrelated families with the diagnosis of grade III-IV non-syndromic bilateral sensorineural loss of hearing. Five recessive mutations (35delG, V371, 312-326del14, 333-334delAA, R127H) and three polymorphic variants (V271, M34T, E114G) were identified in Yakut patients. Mutations 35delG (41.7%), 312-326dell4 (4.2%), and 333-334delAA (4.2%) were found in Caucasian patients (Russians, Ukrainians, Inguish). Yakuts were carriers of mutations 35delG (2.1%), V371 (2.1%), R127H (1.0%) and sequence variants V271 (6.3%), M34T (1.0%), E114G (1.0%). GJB2 mutations were identified in 50.1% of the Caucasian patients and in 7.2% of the Yakut patients. The low frequency of GJB2 mutations in Yakuts with non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing testifies to the presence of mutations of other genes controlling sound perception in this population.
PubMed ID
19008837 View in PubMed
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A descriptive analysis of language and speech skills in 4- to 5-yr-old children with hearing loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136084
Source
Ear Hear. 2011 Sep-Oct;32(5):605-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
Elizabeth M Fitzpatrick
Leah Crawford
Andy Ni
Andrée Durieux-Smith
Author Affiliation
Audiology/Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Canada. elizabeth.fitzpatrick@uottawa.ca
Source
Ear Hear. 2011 Sep-Oct;32(5):605-16
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Cochlear Implants
Female
Hearing
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Humans
Language Development
Language Development Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Linear Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Speech Intelligibility
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Early intervention through hearing aids (HAs) and cochlear implants (CIs) aims to reduce the negative effects of childhood hearing loss and to promote optimal communication development over time. The primary goal of this study was to examine the communication outcomes of children with CIs and children with HAs at age 4 to 5 yrs and to consider their spoken language skills relative to a group of typically developing hearing peers.
In this multicenter observational study, communication results were obtained for a total of 88 children at age 4 to 5 yrs. Participants were recruited from three clinical programs in two cities in the province of Ontario, Canada. This study was undertaken shortly after the introduction of a new provincial population screening initiative and included both children who were screened and not screened for hearing loss. The study sample comprised 51 children with sensorineural hearing loss and 37 children with normal hearing. Of the 51 children with hearing loss, 26 used CIs and 25 used HAs. The degree of hearing loss ranged from mild to profound. All children were enrolled in rehabilitation programs focused on oral language development. Children's language skills were assessed with an extensive battery of child- and parent-administered speech and language measures.
Assessment of language skills showed no significant differences between the children with severe to profound hearing loss using CIs and children with varying degrees of hearing loss using HAs. However, children with HAs showed better articulation skills. Overall, both groups of children obtained scores on communication measures that were lower than their hearing peers. The number of children with hearing loss who obtained spoken speech-language scores within 1 SD of normative populations ranged from 65 to 86% depending on the test measure. Children with average hearing loss of 70 dB HL or better generally obtained scores on all measures in line with those of age-matched norms while scores were quite variable for children with severe and profound hearing loss. Factors influencing performance in children with hearing loss included degree of hearing loss (pure-tone average) and parent education. Age at diagnosis of hearing loss was not a significant predictor of speech-language outcomes in this study.
Results indicated that overall, children with all degrees of hearing loss who were fit with hearing technology and who received auditory-based rehabilitation services during the preschool years demonstrated the potential to develop spoken language communication skills. As a group, children with CIs and children with HAs did not differ significantly on language abilities although there were differences in articulation skills. Their performance at age 4 to 5 yrs was delayed compared with a group of hearing peers. The findings reinforce the need for research to identify factors that are likely to lead to age-appropriate communication skills for preschool-age children with hearing loss.
PubMed ID
21415757 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic patterns in childhood hearing loss: a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6348
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1989 Jul;17(3):239-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1989
Author
J. Davidson
M L Hyde
P W Alberti
Author Affiliation
Silverman Audiology Laboratory, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1989 Jul;17(3):239-66
Date
Jul-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Loss, Conductive - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Models, Statistical
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In an attempt to clarify international epidemiologic trends, a review of the published literature pertaining to childhood hearing loss is presented. Inconsistencies of methodology and classification, which complicate the interpretation of data and make difficult the quantification of the influence of genuine population differences, are discussed. Selective review of the literature allows certain crude statements to be made regarding childhood hearing loss. In developed countries, serous otitis media is the most common cause of hearing loss in children, affecting up to two thirds of preschool children. In addition, 1.0-2.0/1000 children have bilateral SNHL of at least 50 dB. In underdeveloped countries, suppurative middle ear disease is common and is still frequently associated with either an intratemporal or intracranial complication. SNHL appears to occur almost twice as often as in developed countries, with a greater proportion being of infectious etiology. In specific populations, the Inuits, Amerindians and Aboriginals, acute and chronic suppurative otitis media are almost endemic, yet both cholesteatoma and serous otitis media are uncommon.
PubMed ID
2670797 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of hearing loss and aetiological diagnosis of hearing impairment in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40148
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1983 Apr;5(2):151-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
A. Parving
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1983 Apr;5(2):151-65
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Female
Hearing Loss - epidemiology - etiology
Hearing Loss, Conductive - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Rubella - complications
Abstract
A total of 117 children, 55 girls and 62 boys with a median age of 8 years, range 2-12 years, was retrospectively evaluated in consideration of: (1) the prevalence rate and characteristics of permanent hearing loss (defined as the average of 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz greater than or equal to 35 dB HL on the better hearing ear); (2) the aetiology of the hearing impairment; (3) the basis for the aetiological diagnosis in the individual child, and (4) the value of non-audiological investigations. The overall prevalence of permanent hearing loss was 1.4% in this geographical area (children with recurrent episodes of serous otitis media are excluded). In 91% (106/117) the hearing loss was sensorineural, in 4% (5/117) conductive and in 5% (6/117) mixed conductive/sensorineural. In 63% (74/117) the hearing loss had been confirmed and assessed at the age of 3 years, while in 31% (37/117) the hearing loss was ascertained after the age of 3 years. 85% (99/117) were considered to suffer from congenital/early acquired hearing loss. The aetiology of hearing impairment could be assessed in 73% (85/117) of the children, while 27% (32/117) were diagnosed as 'unknown aetiology'. In 48% (56/117) combined audiological/non-audiological investigations had been performed, resulting in a known aetiology in 86% (48/56). In 52% (61/117) only audiological examination had been performed, resulting in a known aetiology of 61% (37/61). A significant difference (P less than 0.005) in known aetiology between these two groups is present, indicating that additional non-audiological evaluation is of decisive importance in the aetiological assessment of hearing impairment. Based on the present and previous investigations, a routine examination programme is proposed directed towards a systematic evaluation of the symptom of hearing loss and its aetiology with due caution to the individual child. The evaluation should be based on a combination of audiological/non-audiological examinations, which includes a broad interdisciplinary cooperation that preferably should be performed at diagnostic assessment centers.
PubMed ID
6874238 View in PubMed
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Ethnicity and mutations in GJB2 (connexin 26) and GJB6 (connexin 30) in a multi-cultural Canadian paediatric Cochlear Implant Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173179
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):435-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Evan Jon Propst
Tracy L Stockley
Karen A Gordon
Robert V Harrison
Blake Croll Papsin
Author Affiliation
Cochlear Implant Program, Department of Otolaryngology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont., Canada M5G 1X8. Evan.propst@utoronto.ca
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Mar;70(3):435-44
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Cochlear Implantation - methods
Connexins - genetics
Cultural Diversity
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA Primers - genetics
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Gene Deletion
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Humans
Mutation, Missense - genetics
Point Mutation - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Program Development
Abstract
To determine the relationship between ethnicity and mutations in the GJB2 and GJB6 genes in multi-cultural patients enrolled in a Canadian paediatric Cochlear Implant Program.
Blood was analyzed from 65 paediatric cochlear implant users by direct sequencing of the coding region and intron/exon boundaries of the GBJ2 gene. Individuals heterozygous for one mutation in GJB2 or in whom mutations in GJB2 were not detected were analyzed for the common 342 kb deletion mutation D13S1830 in the GJB6 gene. Information regarding ethnicity of patients' families was obtained from patient records and/or interview.
GJB2 mutations were found in 36.9% of paediatric cochlear implant users tested. Nine different GJB2 mutations were identified among individuals from 14 different countries of origin. Seventy-eight percent of all identified pathogenic GJB2 mutations were 35delG. Biallelic GJB2 mutations were found in 16 cochlear implant users (66.7% of GJB2 mutations). Three novel GJB2 sequence changes were identified: (1) a missense mutation T107C (L36P) in an individual of African decent; (2) a missense mutation G475T (D159Y) in an individual of Caribbean decent; (3) a regulatory region change 1-34C to T in an individual of African decent. GJB6-D13S1830 mutations were not found in any of the patients tested. Individuals of African, Caribbean and East Indian decent had different GJB2 mutations than the remainder of individuals tested. Patients of Asian, Italian, Spanish, Polish and Armenian decent were not found to carry mutations in GJB2 or the common GJB6-D13S1830 mutation.
This study represents the largest number of biallelic GJB2 mutations isolated in a group of paediatric cochlear implant users to date. Numerous and diverse GJB2 mutations were found in this multi-cultural group of children. Even though GJB2 mutations have been widely reported in the literature, this discussion represents the first report of GJB2 mutations in a multi-ethnic population (Canadian), as compared with previous studies that investigated fairly homogeneous populations. The diversity of GJB2 mutations identified reinforces the importance of testing for changes in GJB2 by direct sequencing of the entire coding region rather than testing only for common mutations.
PubMed ID
16125251 View in PubMed
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39 records – page 1 of 4.