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343 records – page 1 of 35.

Acceptable noise level (ANL) with Danish and non-semantic speech materials in adult hearing-aid users.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123124
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Steen Østergaard Olsen
Johannes Lantz
Lars Holme Nielsen
K Jonas Brännström
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Research Laboratory, University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. steen.olsen@rh.regionh.dk
Source
Int J Audiol. 2012 Sep;51(9):678-88
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Stimulation
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Audiometry, Speech
Auditory Threshold
Correction of Hearing Impairment
Denmark
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Patient satisfaction
Perceptual Masking
Persons With Hearing Impairments - psychology - rehabilitation
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Semantics
Sound Spectrography
Speech Perception
Abstract
The acceptable noise level (ANL) test is used for quantification of the amount of background noise subjects accept when listening to speech. This study investigates Danish hearing-aid users' ANL performance using Danish and non-semantic speech signals, the repeatability of ANL, and the association between ANL and outcome of the international outcome inventory for hearing aids (IOI-HA).
ANL was measured in three conditions in both ears at two test sessions. Subjects completed the IOI-HA and the ANL questionnaire.
Sixty-three Danish hearing-aid users; fifty-seven subjects were full time users and 6 were part time/non users of hearing aids according to the ANL questionnaire.
ANLs were similar to results with American English speech material. The coefficient of repeatability (CR) was 6.5-8.8 dB. IOI-HA scores were not associated to ANL.
Danish and non-semantic ANL versions yield results similar to the American English version. The magnitude of the CR indicates that ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not suitable for prediction of individual patterns of future hearing-aid use or evaluation of individual benefit from hearing-aid features. The ANL with Danish and non-semantic speech materials is not related to IOI-HA outcome.
PubMed ID
22731922 View in PubMed
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Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
I. Tuxen
Source
Scand Audiol Suppl. 1978;(Suppl 8):242-8
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Counseling
Denmark
Hearing Disorders - psychology
Humans
Psychotherapy, Group
Social Adjustment
PubMed ID
299114 View in PubMed
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[A comment concerning the proposal for a competence-center for better hearing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189527
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 May 30;99(22):2556-7; author reply 2557
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-2002

[A complete examination of hearing of preschool children is important]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33590
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Oct 28;95(44):4838
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-1998

The active fitting (AF) programme of hearing aids: a psychological perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8351
Source
Br J Audiol. 1990 Aug;24(4):277-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
M. Eriksson-Mangold
A. Ringdahl
A K Björklund
B. Wåhlin
Author Affiliation
Psychological Department, University of Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Br J Audiol. 1990 Aug;24(4):277-85
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Consumer Satisfaction
Evaluation Studies
Hearing Aids - psychology
Hearing Disorders - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Patients - psychology
Random Allocation
Rehabilitation of Hearing Impaired
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Rehabilitation of the majority of hearing handicapped in Sweden consists of hearing aid fitting, provision of technical devices and information during about four visits to a Hearing Centre. Generally there is no structured guidance of the hearing handicapped on how to proceed with the hearing aid at home between appointments. A programme of active fitting (AF) of hearing aids, with a task-oriented diary, 'Try Your Hearing Aid' as a basic part, was therefore developed. We conducted a series of studies from 1985 to 1988 with the aim of investigating the benefit and applicability of the programme. A total of 128 new hearing aid candidates participated in three studies at the Sahlgrens hospital and at four other hearing centres in smaller Swedish towns. In a controlled study the AF group was more positive to their hearing aids and to the fitting period after 10 months. They used their hearing aids more frequently and felt psychologically more secure with them. It was established that the AF programme could well be applied in the clinical routine for a majority of new hearing aid patients. Old age per se was not found to be a relevant exclusion criterion. The positive outcome of the AF programme has stimulated the Swedish Institute of the Handicapped to print 'Try Your Hearing Aid' with a manual, and to introduce it to all hearing centres in Sweden.
PubMed ID
2224293 View in PubMed
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Acute acoustic trauma in Finnish conscripts. Etiological factors and characteristics of hearing impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231464
Source
Scand Audiol. 1989;18(3):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
J. Ylikoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Helsinki City Hospital, Laakso, Finland.
Source
Scand Audiol. 1989;18(3):161-5
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Finland
Firearms
Hearing Disorders - etiology
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - etiology
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
Etiological factors and otological and audiological findings were analysed retrospectively in 361 Finnish conscripts who had suffered acute acoustic trauma (AAT) from firearms shooting during their military service. The most common cause of AAT was shooting with hand-held weapons without ear-protectors (50%). Other common causal weapons were antitank guns (25%) and cannons (12%). Explosions had caused AAT in one-tenth of the cases. The tympanic membrane had been ruptured in 22 subjects (6%). The frequency at which hearing loss was severest was most commonly 6.0 kHz, followed by 8.0 kHz and 4.0 kHz in that order. Speech frequencies were involved in about 25% of the ears. A flat type of audiometric configuration was observed in about 20% and a rising type (low-tone loss) in about 5% of the ears. Impulse noise from large-calibre guns seemed to cause low-tone hearing loss more often than shooting with hand-held weapons.
PubMed ID
2814330 View in PubMed
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Aetiology and risk indicators of hearing impairments in a one-year birth cohort for 1985-86 in northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33586
Source
Scand Audiol. 1998;27(4):237-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E M Mäki-Torkko
M R Järvelin
M J Sorri
A A Muhli
H F Oja
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland. emt@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand Audiol. 1998;27(4):237-47
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hearing Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
The aetiology and risk indicators of hearing impairments of all types and degrees were studied in a 1-year birth cohort of 8713 children from northern Finland. The subjects (7 years of age) included in the clinical and audiometric examinations were recruited by standard clinical criteria, i.e. suspicion of parents according to a questionnaire, abnormal hearing screening result or a hearing impairment noted in hospital records (n = 541), and by random sampling from among the 8172 not suspected (n = 1009). One-hundred-and-one subjects in the group suspected of having hearing impairment and 27 subjects in the random sample eventually had hearing impairment. The aetiology could be defined in only 44.5% of the cases, ear infections being the most common. In this relatively small series, only a few risk indicators (congenital anomalies, meningitis and a history of ear discharge lasting for over 1 month) could be shown to be associated with impaired hearing in a logistic regression analysis.
PubMed ID
9832406 View in PubMed
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343 records – page 1 of 35.