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Achievement of healthy people 2010 objective for adult pneumococcal vaccination in an American Indian community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97145
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marc S Traeger
Kenneth R Say
Verna Hastings
David A Yost
Author Affiliation
Whiteriver Service Unit, Indian Health Service, Whiteriver, AZ 85941, USA. marc.traeger@ihs.gov
Source
Public Health Rep. 2010 May-Jun;125(3):448-56
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arizona
Benchmarking
Health Plan Implementation
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Indians, North American
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pneumococcal Infections - prevention & control
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) causes significant mortality throughout the United States and greater mortality among American Indian/Alaska Natives. Vaccination reduces S. pneumoniae illness. We describe the methods used to achieve the Healthy People 2010 coverage rate goals for adult pneumococcal vaccine among those at high risk for severe disease in this population. METHODS: We implemented a pneumococcal vaccination project to bolster coverage followed by an ongoing multidisciplinary program. We used community, home, inpatient, and outpatient vaccinations without financial barriers together with data improvement, staff and patient education, standing orders, and electronic and printed vaccination reminders. We reviewed local and national coverage rates and queried our electronic database to determine coverage rates. RESULTS: In 2007, pneumococcal vaccination coverage rates among people > or = 65 years of age and among high-risk people aged 18-64 years were 96.0% and 61.2%, respectively, exceeding Healthy People 2010 goals. Government Performance and Results Act analyses reports revealed a 2.7-fold increase (36.0% to 98.0%) of coverage from 2000 to 2007 among people > or = 65 years of age at Whiteriver Service Unit in Whiteriver, Arizona. CONCLUSIONS: We achieved pneumococcal vaccination rates in targeted groups of an American Indian population that reached Healthy People 2010 goals and were higher than rates in other U.S. populations. Our program may be a useful model for other communities attempting to meet Healthy People 2010 goals.
PubMed ID
20433040 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of human impact assessment in the Finnish Healthy Cities Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167727
Source
Public Health. 2006 Nov;120(11):1033-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
T. Kauppinen
K. Nelimarkka
K. Perttilä
Author Affiliation
The National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES), P.O. Box 220, 00530 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Public Health. 2006 Nov;120(11):1033-41
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
City Planning - organization & administration
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Consumer Participation
Decision Making, Organizational
Demography
Environment
Finland
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Organizational Objectives
Power (Psychology)
Program Development
Social Change
Urban health
Abstract
To develop a framework for analysing the effectiveness of prospective assessment and to apply the framework to human impact assessments (HuIA) carried out in the Finnish Healthy Cities Network.
The framework was formed by synthesizing and developing the themes that emerged from the published literature on effectiveness. The research material consists of interviews with people who participated in the assessment process in the municipalities (19 interviews). The research material also included assessment documents, proceedings of working meetings, municipal policy documents, background material and project reports produced in the municipalities studied. The research datasets were examined by content analysis.
HuIA increased the decision-makers' awareness of effects and functioned as a tool for empowerment. The latter was apparent, for instance, in the social welfare and healthcare sector, finding a role for itself in decisively co-ordinating interdisciplinary work and actively seeking to alleviate identified negative effects. The assessment process also opened up the planning process, committed various actors to the decision, helped select the right alternative and promoted social learning.
From the viewpoint of preparation and decision-making, the effectiveness of a HuIA increases when assessment becomes a recurring process and an integral part of an organization's activities. Integration of an assessment into permanent structures or activities, such as drawing up programmes or preparing strategies, helps the results of the assessment to be seen more clearly. From the viewpoint of decision-making, it is also important to strengthen the decision-makers' expertise in prospective assessment. When the effectiveness of HuIA is looked at in a new way (i.e. from the viewpoint of goal achievement, decision-making or learning), a more comprehensive interpretation can be given.
PubMed ID
16935313 View in PubMed
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[Non smoking goal indisputable but the way getting there should be discussed].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273619
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Magnus Stenbeck
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Smoking Cessation
Sweden
PubMed ID
25756730 View in PubMed
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Prevention, control, and elimination of neglected diseases in the Americas: pathways to integrated, inter-programmatic, inter-sectoral action for health and development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165596
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
John C Holveck
John P Ehrenberg
Steven K Ault
Rocio Rojas
Javier Vasquez
Maria Teresa Cerqueira
Josefa Ippolito-Shepherd
Miguel A Genovese
Mirta Roses Periago
Author Affiliation
Area of Health Surveillance and Disease Management, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, Washington DC 20037, USA. johnholveck@yahoo.com
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caribbean Region - epidemiology
Communicable Disease Control - organization & administration
Community Health Planning
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Environmental Health - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous
Healthy People Programs - organization & administration
Humans
Latin America - epidemiology
Organizational Objectives
Poverty
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
School Health Services
Sociology, Medical
Abstract
In the Latin America and Caribbean region over 210 million people live below the poverty line. These impoverished and marginalized populations are heavily burdened with neglected communicable diseases. These diseases continue to enact a toll, not only on families and communities, but on the economically constrained countries themselves.
As national public health priorities, neglected communicable diseases typically maintain a low profile and are often left out when public health agendas are formulated. While many of the neglected diseases do not directly cause high rates of mortality, they contribute to an enormous rate of morbidity and a drastic reduction in income for the most poverty-stricken families and communities. The persistence of this "vicious cycle" between poverty and poor health demonstrates the importance of linking the activities of the health sector with those of other sectors such as education, housing, water and sanitation, labor, public works, transportation, agriculture, industry, and economic development.
The purpose of this paper is three fold. First, it focuses on a need for integrated "pro-poor" approaches and policies to be developed in order to more adequately address the multi-faceted nature of neglected diseases. This represents a move away from traditional disease-centered approaches to a holistic approach that looks at the overarching causes and mechanisms that influence the health and well being of communities. The second objective of the paper outlines the need for a specific strategy for addressing these diseases and offers several programmatic entry points in the context of broad public health measures involving multiple sectors. Finally, the paper presents several current Pan American Health Organization and other institutional initiatives that already document the importance of integrated, inter-programmatic, and inter-sectoral approaches. They provide the framework for a renewed effort toward the efficient use of resources and the development of a comprehensive integrated solution to neglected communicable diseases found in the context of poverty, and tailored to the needs of local communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17229324 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.