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Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Cancer Education Videos

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288393
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Windows Media Video (.WMV)
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Health & Wellness
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Cancer Education Videos
Female
Humans
Male
Community health workers
Testicular Neoplasms
Alaska Natives
Alaska
Colorectal Neoplasms
Mammography
Neoplasms
Germ Cell and Embryonal
Television
Prostatic Neoplasms
Healthy Lifestyle
Rectal Neoplasms
Abstract
These videos were created to provide culturally informed cancer education resources and learning opportunities for Community Health Aides and Community Health Practitioners (CHA/Ps), the primary providers of health care in rural Alaska, along with the people of their communities. <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/Awake.wmv">Awakening Choices: Colon Health, Our Stories</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Sharing stories: Alaska Native people talk about colon/rectum cancer and healthy lifestyle choices. The importance of early detection through colon/rectum screening is emphasized. [28:17 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.) <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/strong.wmv">Staying Strong, Staying Healthy: Alaska Men Talk About Cancer</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Specifically for Alaska Native men, this program addresses colon/rectum cancer, prostate cancer, and testicular cancer. [28:17 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.) <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/basket.wmv">The Story Basket: Weaving Breast Health into Our Lives</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Alaska Native women discuss the importance of breast health. It includes the process involved in a personal breast exam and mammogram. [30:00 min] <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/garrett/light.wmv">Understanding: Stepping into the Light</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">The play, which was adapted for television to reach rural, Alaska Native communities, enters the silence, making audible the experience of cancer. [27:01 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.)
Online Resources
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Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288411
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Canada
Research
Arctic Regions
Climate Change
Mental Health
Acclimatization
Food
Healthy Lifestyle
Abstract
The Arctic Institute of Community-Based Research (AICBR) is a unique Northern organization that works to bring together multiple groups and sectors on issues that are identified by and relevant to their partners. Current priorities include food security and food sovereignty, healthy lifestyles, youth engagement and mental health, and climate change adaptation.
Online Resources
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Association between sucrose intake and acute coronary event risk and effect modification by lifestyle factors: Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282792
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2016
Author
K. Warfa
I. Drake
P. Wallström
G. Engström
E. Sonestedt
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Nov;116(9):1611-1620
Date
Nov-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Energy Intake - ethnology
Feeding Behavior - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Incidence
Life Style - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - ethnology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that a high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages is positively associated with the risk of a coronary event. However, a few studies have examined the association between sucrose (the most common extrinsic sugar in Sweden) and incident coronary events. The objective of the present study was to examine the associations between sucrose intake and coronary event risk and to determine whether these associations are specific to certain subgroups of the population (i.e. according to physical activity, obesity status, educational level, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, intake of fat and intake of fruits and vegetables). We performed a prospective analysis on 26 190 individuals (62 % women) free from diabetes and without a history of CVD from the Swedish population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort. Over an average of 17 years of follow-up (457 131 person-years), 2493 incident cases of coronary events were identified. Sucrose intake was obtained from an interview-based diet history method, including 7-d records of prepared meals and cold beverages and a 168-item diet questionnaire covering other foods. Participants who consumed >15 % of their energy intake (E%) from sucrose showed a 37 (95 % CI 13, 66) % increased risk of a coronary event compared with the lowest sucrose consumers (
PubMed ID
27774913 View in PubMed
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[Attitudes to food and eating in an Icelandic cohort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279965
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Olof Drofn Sigurbjornsdottir
Johanna Eyrun Torfadottir
Anna Sigridur Olafsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Source
Laeknabladid. 2016 Jul;102(7-8):332-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Choice Behavior
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies exist on eating attitudes and well-being of adults in Iceland. In most Western societies great emphasis is placed on a lean and fit body, nevertheless the number of people gaining weigt keeps increasing. Such circumstances may cause discomfort related to food and food choice. The aim of this study was to examine attitudes towards food and eating among Icelandic adults.
We used data from the Icelandic national health survey of 5,861 adults, age 18-79, conducted in 2007. A numerical assessment tool for measuring eating attitude was established, based on answers to questions on eating attitude. We used binary regression models to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for unhealthy eating attitude according to different demographic factors.
The prevalence of unhealthy eating attitude according to the measurement tool used in the study was 17% among participants, 22% for women and 11% for men. Unhealthy eating attitude was most prevalent in the age-group 18-29 years (36% of women, 15% of men), among those dissatisfied with their body weight (35% of women, 22% of men) and among those defined as obese (38% of women, 23% of men).
Our data show that women are more prone to express unhealthy eating attitude compared to men. Those of younger age, with weight dissatisfaction and with high body mass index are positively associated with unhealthy eating attitude, irrespective of gender.
Diet, Dietary restraint, Public Health, Eating attitude, Body weight satisfaction. Correspondence: Laufey Steingrimsdottir, laufey@hi.is.
PubMed ID
27531852 View in PubMed
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Combined impact of healthy lifestyle factors on lifespan: two prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285647
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):209-219
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
S C Larsson
J. Kaluza
A. Wolk
Source
J Intern Med. 2017 Sep;282(3):209-219
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cause of Death
Female
Health Behavior
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The impact of multiple healthy lifestyle factors on survival time is unclear.
The aim of this study was to examine differences in survival time associated with a healthy lifestyle versus a less healthy lifestyle.
This study consisted of 33 454 men (Cohort of Swedish Men) and 30 639 women (Swedish Mammography Cohort) aged 45-83 years and free of cancer and cardiovascular disease at baseline. The healthy lifestyle factors included the following: (i) nonsmoking; (ii) physical activity at least 150 min per week; (iii) alcohol consumption of 0-14 drinks per week; (iv) and healthy diet defined as a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Diet score above the median. Cox proportional hazards regression models and Laplace regression were used to estimate, respectively, hazard ratios of all-cause mortality and differences in survival time.
During follow-up from 1998 through 2014, 8630 deaths amongst men and 6730 deaths amongst women were ascertained through linkage to the Swedish Cause of Death Register. Each of the four healthy lifestyle factors was inversely associated with all-cause mortality and increased survival time. Compared with individuals with no or one healthy lifestyle factor, the multivariable hazard ratios of all-cause mortality for individuals with all four health behaviours were 0.47 (95% 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.44-0.51) in men and 0.39 (95% CI: 0.35-0.44) in women. This corresponded to a difference in survival time of 4.1 (95% CI: 3.6-4.6) years in men and 4.9 (95% CI: 4.3-5.6) years in women.
Adopting healthy lifestyle behaviours may markedly increase lifespan.
PubMed ID
28561269 View in PubMed
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The cost-effectiveness of interventions targeting lifestyle change for the prevention of diabetes in a Swedish primary care and community based prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291772
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2017 Sep; 18(7):905-919
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Anne Neumann
Lars Lindholm
Margareta Norberg
Olaf Schoffer
Stefanie J Klug
Fredrik Norström
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. Anne.Neumann@uniklinikum-dresden.de.
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2017 Sep; 18(7):905-919
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Exercise
Female
Health Promotion - economics - organization & administration
Healthy Diet
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Weight Loss
Abstract
Policymakers need to know the cost-effectiveness of interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes (T2D). The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of a T2D prevention initiative targeting weight reduction, increased physical activity and healthier diet in persons in pre-diabetic states by comparing a hypothetical intervention versus no intervention in a Swedish setting.
A Markov model was used to study the cost-effectiveness of a T2D prevention program based on lifestyle change versus a control group where no prevention was applied. Analyses were done deterministically and probabilistically based on Monte Carlo simulation for six different scenarios defined by sex and age groups (30, 50, 70 years). Cost and quality adjusted life year (QALY) differences between no intervention and intervention and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were estimated and visualized in cost-effectiveness planes (CE planes) and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEA curves).
All ICERs were cost-effective and ranged from 3833 €/QALY gained (women, 30 years) to 9215 €/QALY gained (men, 70 years). The CEA curves showed that the probability of the intervention being cost-effective at the threshold value of 50,000 € per QALY gained was very high for all scenarios ranging from 85.0 to 91.1%.
The prevention or the delay of the onset of T2D is feasible and cost-effective. A small investment in healthy lifestyle with change in physical activity and diet together with weight loss are very likely to be cost-effective.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27913943 View in PubMed
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Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296600
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2018 Nov; 27(21-22):4040-4049
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Anders Broström
Amir H Pakpour
Martin Ulander
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2018 Nov; 27(21-22):4040-4049
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Feeding Behavior
Female
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Hypertension - complications - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden
Abstract
To develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension.
Cross-sectional design.
A total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used.
Of the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index =30 kg/m2 ). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equation modelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good.
The initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension.
The PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes.
PubMed ID
29776007 View in PubMed
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Digitally supported program for type 2 diabetes risk identification and risk reduction in real-world setting: protocol for the StopDia model and randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299265
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Mar 01; 19(1):255
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Mar-01-2019
Author
Jussi Pihlajamäki
Reija Männikkö
Tanja Tilles-Tirkkonen
Leila Karhunen
Marjukka Kolehmainen
Ursula Schwab
Niina Lintu
Jussi Paananen
Riia Järvenpää
Marja Harjumaa
Janne Martikainen
Johanna Kohl
Kaisa Poutanen
Miikka Ermes
Pilvikki Absetz
Jaana Lindström
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, 70210, Kuopio, Finland. jussi.pihlajamaki@uef.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2019 Mar 01; 19(1):255
Date
Mar-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - economics - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - economics - methods
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - economics - methods
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - economics - methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Assessment - economics - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The StopDia study is based on the convincing scientific evidence that type 2 diabetes (T2D) and its comorbidities can be prevented by a healthy lifestyle. The need for additional research is based on the fact that the attempts to translate scientific evidence into actions in the real-world health care have not led to permanent and cost-effective models to prevent T2D. The specific aims of the StopDia study following the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework are to 1) improve the Reach of individuals at increased risk, 2) evaluate the Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the digital lifestyle intervention and the digital and face-to-face group lifestyle intervention in comparison to routine care in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and 3) evaluate the Adoption and Implementation of the StopDia model by the participants and the health care organizations at society level. Finally, we will address the Maintenance of the lifestyle changes at participant level and that of the program at organisatory level after the RCT.
The StopDia study is carried out in the primary health care system as part of the routine actions of three provinces in Finland, including Northern Savo, Southern Carelia, and Päijät-Häme. We estimate that one fifth of adults aged 18-70?years living in these areas are at increased risk of T2D. We recruit the participants using the StopDia Digital Screening Tool, including questions from the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC). About 3000 individuals at increased risk of T2D (FINDRISC =12 or a history of gestational diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, or impaired glucose tolerance) participate in the one-year randomized controlled trial. We monitor lifestyle factors using the StopDia Digital Questionnaire and metabolism using laboratory tests performed as part of routine actions in the health care system.
Sustainable and scalable models are needed to reach and identify individuals at increased risk of T2D and to deliver personalized and effective lifestyle interventions. With the StopDia study we aim to answer these challenges in a scientific project that is fully digitally integrated into the routine health care.
ClinicalTials.gov . Identifier: NCT03156478 . Date of registration 17.5.2017.
PubMed ID
30823909 View in PubMed
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Does organized sport participation during youth predict healthy habits in adulthood? A 28-year longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294892
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Aug; 28(8):1908-1915
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
S Palomäki
M Hirvensalo
K Smith
O Raitakari
S Männistö
N Hutri-Kähönen
T Tammelin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Aug; 28(8):1908-1915
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Child
Diet
Female
Finland
Habits
Health Behavior
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Self Report
Smoking
Young Adult
Youth Sports
Abstract
Health behaviors in youth can predict the same behaviors later in life, but the role of sport participation in predicting healthy lifestyle habits is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the association between participation in organized youth sport and adult healthy lifestyle habits. Data from the longitudinal Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS) with a 28-year follow-up were used. The participation in sport-club training sessions was self-reported by 9-18-year-olds in 1983 and 1986 (n = 1285). During 2011, participants (aged 37-43-year old) reported their smoking status, alcohol consumption, fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical activity. Odd ratios (OR) were calculated using logistic regression, to examine how participation in organized youth sport was associated with having three or four versus fewer (0-2) healthy habits in adulthood. Participants who were active in youth sport in both 1983 and 1986 had almost two times greater odds of having three or four healthy habits in adulthood than those who were not active at both time points (OR: 1.75, 95%CI: 1.11-2.76). When the analyses were stratified by sex, the findings were statistically significant among women (OR: 2.13, 95%Cl: 1.13-3.99) but not men (OR: 1.27, 95%CI: 0.63-2.58). The results suggest that participation in organized youth sport could promote healthy lifestyle choices.
PubMed ID
29697863 View in PubMed
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Favorable lifestyle before diagnosis associated with lower risk of screen-detected advanced colorectal neoplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281727
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jul 21;22(27):6276-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-2016
Author
Markus D Knudsen
Thomas de Lange
Edoardo Botteri
Dung-Hong Nguyen
Helge Evensen
Chloé B Steen
Geir Hoff
Tomm Bernklev
Anette Hjartåker
Paula Berstad
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jul 21;22(27):6276-86
Date
Jul-21-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Carcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Early Detection of Cancer
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Healthy Diet
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Life Style
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occult Blood
Odds Ratio
Overweight - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sigmoidoscopy
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To investigate the association between adherence to health recommendations and detection of advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACN) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening.
A total of 14832 women and men were invited to CRC screening, 6959 in the fecal immunochemical test arm and 7873 in the flexible sigmoidoscopy arm. These were also sent a self-reported lifestyle questionnaire to be completed prior to their first CRC screening. A lifestyle score was created to reflect current adherence to healthy behaviors in regard to smoking, body mass index, physical activity, alcohol consumption and food consumption, and ranged from zero (poorest) to six (best). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95%CIs were calculated using multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between the single lifestyle variables and the lifestyle score and the probability of detecting ACN.
In all 6315 women and men completed the lifestyle questionnaire, 3323 (53%) in the FIT arm and 2992 (47%) in the FS arm. This was 89% of those who participated in screening. ACN was diagnosed in 311 (5%) participants of which 25 (8%) were diagnosed with CRC. For individuals with a lifestyle score of two, three, four, and five-six, the ORs (95%CI) for the probability of ACN detection were 0.82 (0.45-1.16), 0.43 (0.28-0.73), 0.41 (0.23-0.64), and 0.41 (0.22-0.73), respectively compared to individuals with a lifestyle score of zero-one. Of the single lifestyle factors, adherence to non-smoking and moderate alcohol intake were associated with a decreased probability of ACN detection compared to being a smoker or having a high alcohol intake 0.53 (0.42-0.68) and 0.63 (0.43-0.93) respectively.
Adopted healthy behaviors were inversely associated with the probability of ACN detection. Lifestyle assessment might be useful for risk stratification in CRC screening.
Notes
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