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Cancer disparities among Alaska native people, 1970-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266903
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2014;11:E221
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Janet J Kelly
Anne P Lanier
Teresa Schade
Jennifer Brantley
B Michael Starkey
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2014;11:E221
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
International Classification of Diseases
Male
Middle Aged
National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.)
Neoplasm Invasiveness - diagnosis
Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - mortality
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
SEER Program
Sex Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among Alaska Native people. The objective of this study was to examine cancer incidence data for 2007-2011, age-specific rates for a 15-year period, incidence trends for 1970-2011, and mortality trends for 1990-2011.
US data were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program SEER*Stat database and from the SEER Alaska Native Tumor Registry. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates among Alaska Native people and US whites were compared using rate ratios. Trend analyses were performed using the Joinpoint Regression Program. Mortality data were from National Center for Health Statistics.
During 2007-2011 the cancer incidence rate among Alaska Native women was 16% higher than the rate among US white women and was similar among Alaska Native men and US white men. Incidence rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for nasopharyngeal, stomach, colorectal, lung, and kidney cancer. A downward trend in colorectal cancer incidence among Alaska Native people occurred from 1999 to 2011. Significant declines in rates were not observed for other frequently diagnosed cancers or for all sites combined. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people during 2 periods, 1990-2000 and 2001-2011, did not decline. Cancer mortality rates among Alaska Native people exceeded rates among US whites for all cancers combined; for cancers of the lung, stomach, pancreas, kidney, and cervix; and for colorectal cancer.
Increases in colorectal screening among Alaska Native people may be responsible for current declines in colorectal cancer incidence; however; improvements in treatment of colon and rectal cancers may also be contributing factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25523352 View in PubMed
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[International and national legal mechanisms of ensuring social justice for the elderly].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258674
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A Kh Abashidze
V S Malichenko
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):291-6
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Health Policy
Health Transition
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Internationality
National Health Programs
Needs Assessment
Population Dynamics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Social Justice - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Welfare - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Work - organization & administration
Abstract
Increase in the proportion of older persons in the population of most countries entails a change in the scale and structure of morbidity, which requires higher expenditures on health care and social service. Maintaining health and activity of older people is an important indicator of the effectiveness of public policies in the field of health and social welfare. Under these conditions the development of effective measures to promote prosperous aging is required, which includes primarily legislative, administrative and other measures, as well as development of a strategy and action plan of socio-economic nature, taking into account the needs of older people.
PubMed ID
25306661 View in PubMed
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