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8565 records – page 1 of 857.

A 1-year follow up of psychological wellbeing after subtotal and total hysterectomy--a randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98373
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Persson, P
Brynhildsen, J
Kjølhede, P
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. par.persson@akademiska.se
Source
BJOG. 2010 Mar;117(4):479-87
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - methods - psychology
Mental health
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications - psychology
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare subtotal abdominal hysterectomy (SH) and total abdominal hysterectomy (TH) regarding influence on postoperative psychological wellbeing and surgical outcome measurements. DESIGN: A prospective, open, randomised multicentre trial. SETTING: Seven hospitals and one private clinic in the south-east of Sweden. POPULATION: Two-hundred women scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy for benign conditions were enrolled in the study; 179 women completed the study (94 SH and 85 TH). METHODS: Four different psychometric tests were used to measure general wellbeing, depression and anxiety preoperatively, and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Statistical analysis of variance and covariance were used. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of operating method on psychological wellbeing postoperatively. Analysis of demographic, clinical and surgical data, including peri- and postoperative complications and complaints at follow up. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between the two groups in any of the psychometric tests. Both surgical methods were associated with a significantly higher degree of psychological wellbeing at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, compared with preoperatively. No significant differences were found in the clinical measures including complications. A substantial number of women experienced persistent cyclic vaginal bleedings after SH. Neither minor or major postoperative complications, nor serum concentration of sex hormones, were associated with general psychological wellbeing 12 months after the operation. CONCLUSIONS: General psychological wellbeing is equally improved after both SH and TH within 12 months of the operation, and does not seem to be associated with the occurrence of peroperative complications or serum concentration of sex hormones.
PubMed ID
20074265 View in PubMed
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A 2-year community-randomized controlled trial of fluoride varnish to prevent early childhood caries in Aboriginal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157658
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Herenia P Lawrence
Darlene Binguis
Jan Douglas
Lynda McKeown
Bonita Switzer
Rafael Figueiredo
Audrey Laporte
Author Affiliation
Community Dentistry Discipline, Department of Biological and Diagnostic Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. herenia.lawrence@utoronto.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;36(6):503-16
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers - education
Cariostatic Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Health Education, Dental
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sodium Fluoride - administration & dosage
Tooth, Deciduous
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of fluoride varnish (FV) (Duraflor), 5% sodium fluoride, Pharmascience Inc., Montréal, QC, Canada) and caregiver counseling in preventing early childhood caries (ECC) in Aboriginal children in a 2-year community-randomized controlled trial.
Twenty First Nations communities in the Sioux Lookout Zone (SLZ), Northwest Ontario, Canada were randomized to two study groups. All caregivers received oral health counseling, while children in one group received FV twice per year and the controls received no varnish. A total of 1275, 6 months to 5-year-old children from the SLZ communities were enrolled. In addition, a convenience sample of 150 primarily non-Aboriginal children of the same age were recruited from the neighboring community of Thunder Bay and used as comparisons. Longitudinal examinations for the dmft/s indices were conducted by calibrated hygienists in 2003, 2004 and 2005.
Aboriginal children living in the SLZ or in Thunder Bay had significantly higher caries prevalence and severity than non-Aboriginal children in Thunder Bay. FV treatment conferred an 18% reduction in the 2-year mean 'net' dmfs increment for Aboriginal children and a 25% reduction for all children, using cluster analysis to adjust for the intra-cluster correlation among children in the same community. Adjusted odds ratio for caries incidence was 1.96 times higher in the controls than in the FV group (95% CI = 1.08-3.56; P = 0.027). For those caries-free at baseline, the number (of children) needed to treat (NNT) equaled 7.4.
Findings support the use of FV at least twice per year, in conjunction with caregiver counseling, to prevent ECC, reduce caries increment and oral health inequalities between young Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children.
PubMed ID
18422711 View in PubMed
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[3 reports on population health. Who will take care of my health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 16;88(42):3443-6, 3451-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1991

A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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[10-year dynamics of attitude to health problems in the male population of Novosibirsk (epidemiological study based on the WHO MONICA program)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74937
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Gafarov
V A Pak
I V Gagulin
T D Babina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate changes for a decade in the attitude of men in Novosibirsk to health problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WHO program MONICA has covered males aged 25-64 years (a representative sample from the population in one of the districts of Novosibirsk city). A total of 3 trials were made (in 1984, 1988 and 1994) which included questioning, registration of ECG, arterial pressure, height, body mass, biochemical tests of the blood. RESULTS: Attitude of men to their health depended on their age. There was a trend to evaluate their health as more and more poor in men at the age of 25-43 and 35-44 years. In the group of 45-54-year-olds positive assessment of health was encountered 1.9 times more frequently, but the difference was not significant. At the age 55-64 years a growing number of men tend to assess their health as good. Since 1994 alcoholics among the elderly men grew in number as a response to the social and economic crisis. CONCLUSION: The change in health evaluation from negative to positive in older men may relate to less intensive work.
PubMed ID
12652951 View in PubMed
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A 10-year follow-up of a population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: changes in health-related quality of life and the value of different factors in predicting health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259017
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-2014
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Charlotte Ytterberg
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Sverker Johansson
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-63
Date
Apr-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Population Surveillance - methods
Predictive value of tests
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Health-related quality of life (HRQL) in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) is negatively affected compared to that of the general population. Cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms have been shown to predict worse HRQL in a short-term perspective. Considering the progressive nature of MS, it is essential to include the long-term (10 years) perspective of HRQL in PwMS.
The aim of this 10-year follow-up of a population-based sample of PwMS was to explore changes in and the predictive value of personal factors, degree of MS disability, depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment on HRQL.
Data on personal and disease-specific factors, mood, and cognitive function was collected. Data on HRQL was collected, seen as a health profile with the Sickness Impact Profile, as a health index with the EuroQol 5D and as a single global question with the EQ Visual Analog Scale.
HRQL worsened over 10 years according to the health profile (Sickness Impact Profile Total and its physical dimension) and according to the health index. The effect sizes were small. HRQL assessed with the single global question remained unchanged. Depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment predicted worse HRQL.
In a 10-year perspective the HRQL with regard to its physical domain or when seen as a total health profile tends to get worse in PwMS. Yet, HRQL with regard to its psychosocial domain and with regard to PwMS' self-rated health, remains stable. There is a potential for health-care professionals to decrease the impact of modifiable factors on HRQL in PwMS by identifying those with depressive symptoms and/or cognitive impairment and initiating evidence-based treatment as well as meeting the need for environmental facilitators aiming at reducing disability.
PubMed ID
24492009 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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A 12-year follow-up of subjects initially sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71946
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2001;6(1):52-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
G. Kjellman
B. Oberg
G. Hensing
K. Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Physiother Res Int. 2001;6(1):52-63
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Employment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Low Back Pain - physiopathology
Male
Neck Pain - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - physiopathology
Sick Leave
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Neck/shoulder and low back pain are common in the Western world and can cause great personal and economic consequences, but so far there are few long term follow-up studies of the consequences of back pain, especially studies that separate the location of back pain. More knowledge is needed about different patterns of risk factors and prognoses for neck/shoulder and low back pain, respectively, and they should not be treated as similar conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible long-term differences in neck/shoulder and low back symptoms, experienced over a 12-year period, with regard to work status, present health, discomfort and influence on daily activities. METHOD: A retrospective cohort study of individuals sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses 12 years ago was undertaken. Included were all 213 people who, in 1985, lived in the municipality of Linköping, Sweden, were aged 25-34 years and who had taken at least one new period of sickleave lasting > 28 days with a neck/shoulder or low back diagnosis. In 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to the 204 people who were still resident in Sweden (response rate 73%). RESULTS: Those initially absent with neck/shoulder diagnoses rated their present state of discomfort as worse than those sicklisted with low back diagnoses. Only 4% of the neck/shoulder group reported no present discomfort compared with 25% of the low back group. Notably, both groups reported the same duration of low back discomfort during the last year, which may indicate a higher risk for symptoms in more than one location for subjects with neck/shoulder problems. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with sickness absence of more than 28 days with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses appear to be at high risk of developing long-standing symptoms significantly more so for those initially having neck/shoulder diagnoses.
PubMed ID
11379256 View in PubMed
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A 15-yr longitudinal study of xerostomia in a Swedish population of 50-yr-old subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90130
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2009 Feb;117(1):13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Johansson Ann-Katrin
Johansson Anders
Unell Lennart
Ekbäck Gunnar
Ordell Sven
Carlsson Gunnar E
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry-Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Ann-Katrin.Johansson@iko.uib.no
Source
Eur J Oral Sci. 2009 Feb;117(1):13-9
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Xerostomia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the changes in prevalence of xerostomia in subjects from 50 to 65 yr of age. Questionnaires were sent to all subjects who were born in 1942 and were living in two Swedish counties in 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. The analyses focused on those who answered the questionnaires both in 1992 and in 2007. The response rate was 71.4% (n = 6,346) in 1992 and 73.1% (n = 6,078) in 2007. Of those who answered the questionnaire in 1992, 74.3% (n = 4,714) also responded in 2007. There was an almost linear increase in the prevalence of xerostomia at the four study time-points (i.e. when the subjects were 50, 55, 60, and 65 yr of age). Xerostomia was more prevalent at night than during the day. The pooled prevalence of night-time and daytime xerostomia was 6% at 50 yr of age and 15% at 65 yr of age, and it was higher in women than in men on both occasions. Logistic regression analyses showed that impaired health and smoking were significantly associated with daytime xerostomia but not with night-time xerostomia. Despite the increase in prevalence of xerostomia from 50 to 65 yr of age, there was considerable variation during the observation period. The incidence rate was 13% (507/4,015) and the disappearance rate was 42% (104/250) (dichotomized answers).
PubMed ID
19196313 View in PubMed
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8565 records – page 1 of 857.