Skip header and navigation

Refine By

3273 records – page 1 of 328.

Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
William H Ryding
Author Affiliation
Hastings and Prince Edward Counties Health Unit, Belleville, Ontario, Canada. bryding@hpechu.on.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs
Poverty
PubMed ID
16480604 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 health stories that mattered: May 26-30.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104218
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):E358
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2014
Author
Roger Collier
Author Affiliation
CMAJ.
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):E358
Date
Jul-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Care Reform
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Public Health
PubMed ID
24890111 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 15-year follow-up study of 30-year-old Danes with regard to orthodontic treatment experience and perceived need for treatment in a region without organized orthodontic care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241704
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Aug;11(4):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1983
Author
S. Helm
S. Kreiborg
B. Solow
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1983 Aug;11(4):199-204
Date
Aug-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Malocclusion - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Orthodontics, Corrective
Abstract
It was the aim to study orthodontic treatment experience and past and present perceived need for treatment in 30-year-old Danes who, at adolescence, had no access to organized orthodontic care. In order to identify the malocclusion traits which elicited treatment or need for treatment, the findings were related to the occurrence of various traits which had been registered in the same individuals 15 years earlier. From questionnaires (response rate 86%, n = 841) it appeared that 10% had received treatment and 20% perceived need for treatment either in childhood or at present. At adolescence, the subjects who had subsequently received treatment, displayed relatively high frequencies of ectopic eruption, anterior cross-bite, extreme maxillary overjet, deep bite, and crowding; among those who perceived need for treatment, extreme maxillary overjet, mandibular overjet and crowding were relatively prevalent.
PubMed ID
6576877 View in PubMed
Less detail

[20 years of a sex education clinic. Are family planning centers still needed?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224305
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Feb 28;112(6):781-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1992
Author
G C Alfsen
S. Hokstad
Author Affiliation
Klinikk for seksuell opplysning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Feb 28;112(6):781-4
Date
Feb-28-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities - history - trends
Family Planning Services - history - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics - trends
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Norway
Sex Education - history - trends
Abstract
The Sexual Information Clinic in Oslo was founded more than 20 years ago. The clinic is the largest family planning centre in Norway, treating 4,000-6,000 patients per year. In recent years the treatment of venereal diseases has become the major component of the daily work. The authors describe the different groups of patients who visit the clinic. The meanage of the patients is 21 years. The high number of legal abortions among younger women and the rising incidence of sexually transmitted diseases prove the continued existence of a need for family planning centres. The authors discuss the situation of family planning centres in Norway in general and stress the importance of their work. They argue that all venereal diseases should be treated free of charge.
PubMed ID
1561604 View in PubMed
Less detail

[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
Less detail

[1967-82, an evaluation of the Swedish experience with maintenance methadone therapy of morphine addicts].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242669
Source
Minerva Med. 1982 Dec 8;73(47):3353-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-8-1982
Author
M. Scordato
Source
Minerva Med. 1982 Dec 8;73(47):3353-8
Date
Dec-8-1982
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Methadone - therapeutic use
Morphine Dependence - drug therapy - rehabilitation
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
Since 1967, 170 heroin addicts have used methadone-based maintenance therapy. The experimental programme, confined to the Uppsala Psychiatric Clinic, followed the Dole-Nyswander method. Evaluation of the results shows the therapy to be successful in reducing mortality and permanent disability rates in heroin users. In addition it was found that addicts included in the programme were more likely to achieve complete social rehabilitation. In spite of much criticism, the experiment was sufficiently successful to justify its continuation, though still within the limits and along the lines adopted in the past.
PubMed ID
7177464 View in PubMed
Less detail

3273 records – page 1 of 328.