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1000 records – page 1 of 100.

[2 cities or: Contrasts within mental deficiency care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43050
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1974 Mar 11;136(11):611-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1974

[4 weeks in Vindeln teaches patients to eat, live and get good exercise. Interview by Anita Widén.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50401
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Mar 8;8(5):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1984

[5-day work week in antitubercular dispensaries in the Ukrainian SSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70111
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1970;48(6):14-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
N A Maslenkova
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1970;48(6):14-7
Date
1970
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Health Facilities - utilization
Humans
Time Factors
Tuberculosis - therapy
Ukraine
PubMed ID
5447926 View in PubMed
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2007 Alaska Health Workforce Vacancy Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297295
Source
Alaska Center for Rural Health - Alaska's AHEC. University of Alaska Anchorage. 79 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 2007
. Unit of Analysis The unit of analysis was not the health facility but rather the managing organization, specifically the human resources/personnel department of organizations providing health services, including behavioral health. In the case of larger organizations, such as tribal health
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Center for Rural Health - Alaska's AHEC. University of Alaska Anchorage. 79 p.
Date
July 2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1050325
Keywords
Alaska
Medical personnel
Supply and demand
Statistics
Health facilities
Employees
Medical care surveys
Health planning
Manpower planning
Documents
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2009 Alaska health workforce vacancy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288901
Source
Anchorage, AK : Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 94 pages.
Date
2009
  1 document     1 website  
Author
Alaska Center for Rural Health.
Landon, Beth
Source
Anchorage, AK : Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage. 94 pages.
Date
2009
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
File Size
1879670
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Medical personnel
Supply and demand
Statistics
Health facilities
Employees
Medical care surveys
Health planning
Manpower planning
Abstract
This health workforce study is an assessment of health manpower shortage based on budgeted staff positions and their vacancies in organizations throughout the state. This report highlights employers' needs for employees to fill budgeted positions. This is different from a needs assessment that would take into account population demographics and disease incidence and prevalence.
Notes
ALASKA RA410.8.A4A43 2009
Funding provided by Alaska Mental Health Trust Authority, Alaskan's for Access to Health Care (ACCESS), University of Alaska Fairbanks, Tanana Valley campus Telemedicine program, and University of Alaska Anchorage's Community and Technical College (CTC) and the School of Nursing.
Online Resources
Documents
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Abridged version of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada's discussion paper on rural hospital service closures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149706
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Peter Hutten-Czapski
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Shawville, Que. phc@srpc.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Savings
Health Facility Closure
Hospitals, Rural - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Regional Health Planning
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19594995 View in PubMed
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Accelerating the workplace health agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142056
Source
Healthc Pap. 2010;10(3):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Louise Lemieux-Charles
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2010;10(3):33-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health facilities
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Occupational Health
Abstract
Lowe and Chan's proposal for the development of common work environment metrics is long overdue. The authors' healthy work environment (HWE) framework is evidence based and illustrates the relationships between HWEs and organizational-level outcomes in a succinct yet comprehensive manner. The challenges we face in implementing their framework are related not so much to a fear of change but to a willingness to engage with multiple stakeholders and levels of government in coordinating our efforts. To date, we have lacked, at the policy level, a belief that HWEs can reduce operating costs, improve human resource utilization and, ultimately, lead to higher-quality patient care. We need a framework that will allow us to compare organizational performance in the area of health human resources in the same manner as we compare organizational outcomes in other areas. Such comparisons would allow us to further our understanding of the relationships among care providers, workplaces and organizational outcomes.
PubMed ID
20644350 View in PubMed
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Access and utilization: a continuum of health service environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211173
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
M W Rosenberg
N T Hanlon
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Income
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Birch and Abelson [1] argue that non-income based barriers might explain differences in utilization of health services within and between income groups. Databases which contain utilization data rarely allow for the modelling of geographic variation. In the Ontario Health Survey (OHS), individual observations are georeferenced at the Public Health Unit (PHU) scale, but PHUs cannot easily be used because of the large coefficients of variation. To overcome this problem, a cluster analysis is performed to create a service environment variable, which reflects differences in service availability, population size and rurality. Utilization of health services is then modelled as a logistic regression equation where the independent variables are age, sex, service environment and income to test the Birch and Abelson argument. This argument is then extended by controlling for age, health and income status. Based on the modelling results, the importance of geography to access and utilization is assessed.
PubMed ID
8888467 View in PubMed
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Access to electronic health records by care setting and provider type: perceptions of cancer care providers in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149234
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Margo C Orchard
Mark J Dobrow
Lawrence Paszat
Hedy Jiang
Patrick Brown
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5J 2P1, Canada. margo.orchard@utoronto.ca
Source
BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2009;9:38
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Adult
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Facilities - classification
Health Personnel - classification
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - supply & distribution - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario
Abstract
The use of electronic health records (EHRs) to support the organization and delivery of healthcare is evolving rapidly. However, little is known regarding potential variation in access to EHRs by provider type or care setting. This paper reports on observed variation in the perceptions of access to EHRs by a wide range of cancer care providers covering diverse cancer care settings in Ontario, Canada.
Perspectives were sought regarding EHR access and health record completeness for cancer patients as part of an internet survey of 5663 cancer care providers and administrators in Ontario. Data were analyzed using a multilevel logistic regression model. Provider type, location of work, and access to computer or internet were included as covariates in the model.
A total of 1997 of 5663 (35%) valid responses were collected. Focusing on data from cancer care providers (N = 1247), significant variation in EHR access and health record completeness was observed between provider types, location of work, and level of computer access. Providers who worked in community hospitals were half as likely as those who worked in teaching hospitals to have access to their patients' EHRs (OR 0.45 95% CI: 0.24-0.85, p
Notes
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Cites: Cancer. 2008 Feb 15;112(4):934-4218181099
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PubMed ID
19664247 View in PubMed
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1000 records – page 1 of 100.