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Climate Change and Health: Northwest Voices on Food Security

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300774
Source
Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. 1 poster presented by Rebecca Barker on behalf of ICHS at the Alaska Food Festival and Conference held at the University of Alaska Anchorage, November 7-9, 2014.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2014
  1 document  
Author
David Driscoll
Janet Johnston
Susan Renes
Erica Mitchell
Rebecca Barker
Source
Institute of Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. 1 poster presented by Rebecca Barker on behalf of ICHS at the Alaska Food Festival and Conference held at the University of Alaska Anchorage, November 7-9, 2014.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
653583
Keywords
Alaska
Food security
Climate change
Health effects
Traditional diet
Documents

ak-food-conf-ichs-poster.pdf

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Contaminants in Alaska: Is America's Arctic at Risk?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301274
Source
Alaska Native Science Commission.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2005
  1 document  
Source
Alaska Native Science Commission.
Date
2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
2081104
Keywords
Alaska
Heavy metals
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Health effects
Humans
Animals
Documents

Persistant-Organic-Pollutants.pdf

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Human interaction with the Antarctic environment: Studies in immunology, photobiology and epidemiology

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102198
Source
Pages 407-409 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
environment and UV exposure and whether the outdoor clothing gives protection in Antarctica proposed studies are outlined. In assessing the health effects of ozone depletion it is important to review the incidences of UV -related disease in different latitudes as well as to compare latitudes in different
  1 document  
Author
Lugg, D
Author Affiliation
Australian Antarctic Division, Kingston, Tasmania, Australia
Source
Pages 407-409 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Antarctica
Environment
Epidemiology
Health effects
Immunology
Latitudes
Ozone depletion
Photobiology
UV exposure
Abstract
Interrelated studies on immunology, photobiology, and epidemiology carried out on the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) over the past decade are described. Although subjects generally spend from one to two years continuously in Antarctica, many return a number of times. In order to assess the long-term effects of the environment and UV exposure and whether the outdoor clothing gives protection in Antarctica, proposed studies are outlined. In assessing the health effects of ozone depletion it is important to review the incidences of UV -related disease in different latitudes as well as to compare latitudes in different hemispheres. Comparisons between North and South polar regions may be valuable for future management.
Documents
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Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
, consumption pattern changes. pressure on resource management and land use, etc). Finally, induced impacts of direct and indirect health effects are illustrated by case study examples of mineral resource development projects. Cumulauve impacts of mining are highlighted in view of the need to evaluate and
  1 document  
Author
Grondin, J
Bruneau, S
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Service, Centre for Public Health, Québec, Canada
Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Environmental health
Food chain
Health effects
Human
Impacts
Inuit
Mineral resource development
Mining
Risk
Abstract
The presentation focuses on the repercussions of mining on the relations between the physical and human environments in the Arctic. Direct and indirect effects of mining on Inuit health are discussed from the general perspective of environmental health. First, potential direct effects on the human environment are described from the viewpoint of occupational health (traumatic, physical, chemical, biological risks) and the population's risks in regard to marine and land transportation. Then, indirect toxicological risks (mainly through the contamination of the food chain) as well as social and cultural impacts on human health are discussed (e.g., through relational stress, consumption pattern changes, pressure on resource management and land use, etc.). Finally, induced impacts of direct and indirect health effects are illustrated by case study examples of mineral resource development projects. Cumulative impacts of mining are highlighted in view of the need to evaluate and monitor long-term as well as short-term health effects through the integration of multidisciplinary evaluations and local knowledge, expectancies, and issues.
Documents
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Nuclear Wastes in the Arctic: An Analysis of Arctic and Other Regional Impacts From Soviet Nuclear Contamination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301377
Source
Office of Technology Assessment, Congress of the United States. OTA-ENV-632.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1995
Pacific, and Alaska 50 Research and Monitoring: Data Gaps and Future Needs 60 Remediation Options 63 Conclusions 71 References 72 3 Environmental and Health Effects of Nuclear Waste Dumping in the Arctic 79 Human Health Effects from Radiation 80 Sources of Ionizing Radiation 85 Potential Health
  1 document  
Source
Office of Technology Assessment, Congress of the United States. OTA-ENV-632.
Date
September 1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2833960
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Nuclear waste
Contamination
Environmental effects
Radiation
Health effects
Risk factors
Frameworks and policies
Documents

Nuclear-Wastes-in-the-Arctic_-An-Analysis-of-Arctic-and-Other-Regional-Impacts-From-Soviet-Nuclear-Contamination.pdf

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Source
Chapter 12 (pp. 775-837) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
  1 website  
Author
Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme
Source
Chapter 12 (pp. 775-837) of AMAP Assessment Report: Arctic Pollution Issues
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Contaminants
Essential elements
Health effects
Heavy metals
International data comparison
Nutrients
PAHs
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
Radionuclides
Risk assessment, management, and communication
Toxicology
UV radiation
Abstract
This chapter on human health describes the levels of contaminants in humans and their effects on human health. It has not been written as an overview of the general health of the peoples of the Arctic. Rather, this chapter is an evaluation of the current knowledge of the consequences to Arctic peoples of environmental exposure to priority contaminants as defined in the AMAP mandate. Indirect health implications of climate change, oil pollution, and waste sites are treated in other chapters of this report.
Notes
Book available in UAA/APU Consortium Library Alaskana Collection: TD190.5.A75 1998; and in ARLIS General Collection: TD190.5A46 1998
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Use of traditional foods in a healthy diet in Alaska: Risks in perspective. Second Edition: Volume 1. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and related compounds

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87817
Source
Recommendations and Reports 8(8)
Publication Type
Report
Date
25 October 2004
  1 website  
Author
State of Alaska, DPH, Section of Epidemiology
Source
Recommendations and Reports 8(8)
Date
25 October 2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Concentrations of PCBs
Dioxins and Related Chemicals in Humans
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
Potential Health Effects of PCB-like Chemicals
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are lipophilic, persistent, usually man-made chemicals. Due to concerns over potential adverse ecological and human health effects, the manufacture of PCBs was banned several decades ago by many industrial nations. However, trace amounts of PCDDs and PCDFs continue to be unintentionally produced during some industrial processes.
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7 records – page 1 of 1.