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237 records – page 1 of 24.

Accident prevention activities in the Norwegian municipalities: the local response to a nationwide campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36240
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
F. Thuen
J G Maeland
Author Affiliation
Research Center for Health Promotion, University of Bergen.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1993 Jun;21(2):129-34
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adult
Child
Consumer Participation - trends
Health Education - trends
Health Plan Implementation
Health Promotion - trends
Humans
Norway
Patient care team
Abstract
The Norwegian "Campaign Against Home Accidents" was launched nationwide during 1988 to 1991, with the goal of reducing the incidence of home accidents by 20%. The aim of the campaign was to urge primarily the municipal health services to form local accident prevention groups and to implement local measures for prevention of home accidents. On the basis of two surveys, after one year and at the end of the national campaign, an evaluation was carried out concerning the participation of the municipal health services in the campaign and the impact of the campaign on local accident prevention activities. The results indicate that the national campaign engaged the majority of the municipalities and stimulated local accident prevention work to some extent. Most local activities were health education measures, whereas environmental intervention were less commonly reported. Involvement in the campaign was the variable most related to level of accident prevention activities at the end of the campaign period. However, the relationship was only modest. Restricted economical resources, too little emphasis on environmental change, lack of political involvement and insufficient use of coalition partners at the community level are suggested as the major explanations for the limited effect of the campaign.
PubMed ID
8367680 View in PubMed
Less detail

[AIDS information. Gjøvik study: disparity between knowledge and behavior]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8627
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 May 5;76(9):suppl 1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-5-1988
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 May 5;76(9):suppl 1-2
Date
May-5-1988
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - transmission
Health education
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
3394016 View in PubMed
Less detail

[AIDS preventive work in Arusha and Kilimanjaro--health education]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7853
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3278-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1995
Author
K I Klepp
M H Msuya
B A Lyimo
P. Bergsjø
Author Affiliation
Senter for internasjonal helse/HEMIL-senteret, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Oct 30;115(26):3278-80
Date
Oct-30-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Developing Countries - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Norway
Socioeconomic Factors
Tanzania - epidemiology
Abstract
Over the past five years the Tanzanian-Norwegian AIDS Project (MUTAN) has assisted the National AIDS Control Programme in creating and testing innovative HIV/AIDS educational programmes. These programmes, designed to reach a variety of target groups, have been implemented throughout the Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions and include: public meetings, intensive courses, information centres, radio programmes and school-based programmes. A recent survey of 996 participants (15-54 years old) was designed to assess public exposure to HIV/AIDS information. A total of 72% of the participants reported having heard about AIDS on the radio, 74% having read about AIDS in newspapers, and 52% having heard about AIDS from a health worker during the previous month. Furthermore, 26% had listened to MUTAN's weekly radio programme at least once. 31% knew of MUTAN's information centres, and 15% had visited one of these centres. The results indicate that large proportion of the population is receiving in-depth HIV/AIDS information. It is recommended that future work concentrate on how to reach people with no or little formal education, young adults and women.
PubMed ID
7482460 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and stress in Norwegian United Nations peacekeepers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10584
Source
Mil Med. 1999 Oct;164(10):720-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
L. Mehlum
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Defense Command Headquarters, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mil Med. 1999 Oct;164(10):720-4
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Burnout, Professional - prevention & control - psychology
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Lebanon
Male
Mass Screening
Military Personnel - education - psychology
Norway
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Risk factors
United Nations
War
Abstract
Peacekeepers are frequently exposed to dangerous, provoking, or humiliating situations and have limited possibilities to express the resulting anger and frustrations. Self-medication with alcohol and drugs to calm down may result. A representative sample (N = 888) of Norwegian United Nations veterans who served in South Lebanon completed a questionnaire regarding service-related stress and the role of alcohol in stress management. A total of 43.5% of the respondents reported that they had increased their consumption of alcohol during the mission. Overall, only a minority gave reasons such as tension, restlessness, anxiety, and stress to explain the increase. Respondents who had been exposed to the highest levels of stress, however, reported significantly more frequently these potentially pathological reasons for increased drinking. To prevent such outcomes, personnel need to be screened for risk reactions and to be educated in alternative stress management measures. Furthermore, management of both stress and the destructive use of alcohol is clearly a leadership issue.
PubMed ID
10544627 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol education among junior high school students. Results from a WHO educational program]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11772
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):202-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1993
Author
K I Klepp
R B Waahlberg
C L Perry
D R Jacobs
K. Andersson
M. Grant
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1993 Jan 20;113(2):202-5
Date
Jan-20-1993
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholism - prevention & control
English Abstract
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Norway
School Health Services
Students - psychology
World Health Organization
Abstract
A school-based social influences approach to alcohol education was tested among Norwegian 8th grade lower secondary school students. The goal of the programme was to delay onset and minimize involvement in use of alcohol among the participants. 15 schools were randomly assigned to peer-led education, teacher-led education or a control condition. The programme focused on the social and environmental influences to drink alcohol, and skills to resist those influences. It consisted of five lessons over two months. Baseline and post-test data measured alcohol-use, knowledge, attitudes, skills, friends' drinking, and intentions to drink alcohol in the future. Data were collected immediately prior to and following the educational programme. The data indicate that peer-led education appears to be efficacious in reducing alcohol use and intention to use alcohol. There was no intervention effect of the peer-led programme for knowledge, attitudes or skills. There was no intervention effect for the teacher-led education.
PubMed ID
8430402 View in PubMed
Less detail

Always stay cheerful - health information in the 1920s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298442
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
10-30-2018
Author
Erlend Hem
Rannveig Nordhagen
Per E Børdahl
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 10 30; 138(17):
Date
10-30-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health - history
Consumer Health Information - history
Health Education - history
Health Promotion - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Mothers - education - history
Norway
Posters as Topic
Preventive Health Services - history
Public Health - history
Abstract
The interwar period was a time of comprehensive preventive health programmes in Norway. Physical exercise, nutritious diets, strict sleep regimens and better hygiene were at the centre of these efforts. A massive mobilisation of volunteers and professionals took place. The publication of House Maxims for Mothers and Children was part of this large-scale mobilisation, and consisted of ten posters with pithy health advice for hanging on the wall. Mothers were an important target group for health promotion.
The posters have previously received little attention in medical literature, but they can elucidate some features of life and the health propaganda of their time. We have used databases that provide access to newspapers, books and medical literature: Retriever, bokhylla.no, Oria, PubMed and Web of Science.
It is hard to quantify the effect of this popular movement when compared to political measures to improve living conditions. In any case, mortality rates fell, life expectancy increased and the dreaded communicable diseases were largely defeated. Special efforts were targeted at children, also with good results. Infant mortality fell and schoolchildren became healthier, stronger, taller and cleaner.
The line between social hygiene and general disciplining is blurred, for example the boundary between a healthy diet and bourgeois norms. The education of mothers and children also included a normative aspect that concerned good manners and control.
Notes
ErratumIn: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 Oct 31;138(19): PMID 30497256
PubMed ID
30378403 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of an injury prevention campaign in general practice in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39544
Source
Fam Pract. 1985 Jun;2(2):91-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1985
Author
G. Tellnes
Source
Fam Pract. 1985 Jun;2(2):91-3
Date
Jun-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home
Accidents, Occupational
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Practice
Female
Health education
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
When the community diagnosis was described for two islands, Vaerøy and Røst, in 1970-73 injuries were found to be the most common single diagnosis. During one year (1979-80) all the injured patients who contacted the district physician in the municipality of Vaerøy were recorded in order to study the aetiology of injuries. Based on the experience from this study, an injury prevention programme was designed for this local community. The campaign started in 1981. A follow-up study in 1981-83 evaluated the effect of the prevention campaign. Two years after the programme started, the occurrence of injuries had declined by 29 per cent.
PubMed ID
4007319 View in PubMed
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[Are electromagnetic fields created by electric means hazardous to health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202864
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Feb 10;119(4):490
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1999

Assessing the validity of road safety evaluation studies by analysing causal chains.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30851
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2003 Sep;35(5):741-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Rune Elvik
Author Affiliation
Institute of Transport Economics, PO Box 6110, Etterstad, N-0602, Oslo, Norway. rune.elvik@toi.no
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2003 Sep;35(5):741-8
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Norway
Program Evaluation - methods - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sodium Chloride
Surface Properties
Abstract
This paper discusses how the validity of road safety evaluation studies can be assessed by analysing causal chains. A causal chain denotes the path through which a road safety measure influences the number of accidents. Two cases are examined. One involves chemical de-icing of roads (salting). The intended causal chain of this measure is: spread of salt --> removal of snow and ice from the road surface --> improved friction --> shorter stopping distance --> fewer accidents. A Norwegian study that evaluated the effects of salting on accident rate provides information that describes this causal chain. This information indicates that the study overestimated the effect of salting on accident rate, and suggests that this estimate is influenced by confounding variables the study did not control for. The other case involves a traffic club for children. The intended causal chain in this study was: join the club --> improve knowledge --> improve behaviour --> reduce accident rate. In this case, results are rather messy, which suggests that the observed difference in accident rate between members and non-members of the traffic club is not primarily attributable to membership in the club. The two cases show that by analysing causal chains, one may uncover confounding factors that were not adequately controlled in a study. Lack of control for confounding factors remains the most serious threat to the validity of road safety evaluation studies.
PubMed ID
12850075 View in PubMed
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237 records – page 1 of 24.