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Aboriginal patient navigators: Facilitating access to mainstream health services for aboriginal people

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96161
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Aboriginal patients' ability to navigate the mainstream health system, fostering connections with hospitals, long term care facilities, mental health and addiction programs and services, and encouraging a holistic and culturally inclusive approach to health care delivery. Additionally, APNs have supported
  1 document  
Author
Day, L.
Vlahos, P.
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health Authority
Source
Page 497 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal health practices and beliefs
Aboriginal Patient Navigator (APN) program
Continuity of care
Discharge planning
Health care delivery
Networking
Referral and advocacy
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 12. Primary Care, Service Delivery, Health Promotion and E-Health.
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A case study evaluation of a satellite video telemedicine project in rural Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288597
Source
University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A. 1982.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
1976
Author
Foote, D.
Author Affiliation
Stanford University
Source
University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A. 1982.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Medical -- Administration
Medicine -- Communication systems. -- Alaska
Television in medicine.
Rural health services -- Alaska.
ATS-1 (Artificial satellite)
Artificial satellites in telecommunication -- Alaska.
Health Services Administration
Health care delivery
Medical care -- Technology & Engineering
Telecommunications
Notes
ALASKA R118.4.A4 F66 1976a
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Changing the paradigms in health care: Sioux Lookout Zone after Scott-McKay-Bain

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102140
Source
Pages 157-159 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
. This paper outlines the background and recommendations of the Scott-McKay-Bain Report, the. activities which have taken place since the report was developed and the key concepts and issues which are working as Sioux Lookout moves to a new partnership in health care delivery. Historical and
  1 document  
Author
Wigmore, M
Gordon, J
Author Affiliation
Community Health Planning and Development, Ontario Region, Medical Services Branch, Health and Welfare Canada
Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 157-159 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aboriginal people
Canada
First Nations
Health care delivery
Hospital redevelopment
Partnerships
Sioux Lookout
Abstract
The federal government operates several "Indian Hospitals" across Canada. One of these is in Sioux Lookout, a small town in northwestern Ontario, where it exists alongside a provincial hospital. In 1987, the federal government announced plans to amalgamate the hospitals and to transfer responsibility for the operations to a local hospital board. This caused concern amongst First Nations in the area fearing loss of service, lack of input into planning, and a lessening of the federal role in health care. A hunger strike at the hospital brought national attention to health issues in the area, and the Scott-McKay-Bain Panel was formed to examine the issues. This panel reported in 1989 and had two major recommendations: establishment of a Native health authority for community-based programs, and unification of the hospitals with Native involvement in planning and majority native Board representation. Since that time, work has begun on both the Aboriginal Health Authority and the amalgamation of the hospitals. Concepts such as primary health care, participatory research, community involvement, the movement of resources from the institution to the community, and the role of the federal government in aboriginal health care have been brought forward in these discussions. In addition, a partnership between the federal and provincial governments, the town of Sioux Lookout, and the first Nations of the Sioux Lookout area has developed. This paper outlines the background and recommendations of the Scott-McKay-Bain Report, the activities that have taken place since the report, and the key concepts and issues as Sioux Lookout moves to a new partnership in health care delivery.
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Delivery of physiotherapy services to some First Nations communities in Manitoba

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2937
Source
Pages 697-701 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
. Results: Physiotherapy services can be effectively provided in isolated set- tings by an outreach program using experienced therapists based in a central location. Keywords: Canada; First Nations Therapy Program: Physiotherapy: Health care delivery The First Nations Therapy Program of Community
  1 document  
Author
Thomas, M.
Author Affiliation
Community Therapy Services, Inc., Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 697-701 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
First Nations Therapy Program
Health care delivery
Physiotherapy
Abstract
PURPOSE: This program was instituted to extend physiotherapy services to communities without road access to traditional rehabilitation services. METHODS: Physiotherapy consulting services are provided on a monthly basis to communities involved in the program. Service is based in the communities' nursing stations and includes four components: direct care to clients, preventive care, professional resources, and education. RESULTS: Physiotherapy services can be effectively provided in isolated settings by an outreach program using experienced therapists based in a central location.
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Designing a home health care system for Alaska Natives in Anchorage

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2930
Source
Pages 675-678 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
system are significant savings and more efficient personalized health care. Keywords: Alaska; Anchorage; Home health care; Alaska Natives; Cultural values; Health care delivery INTRODUCTION There are many patients institutionalized in medical facilities within the United States and other
  1 document  
Author
Mala, T.A.
Gottlieb, K.L.
Author Affiliation
Southcentral (Tribal Health Care) Foundation, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 675-678 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Anchorage
Cultural values
Health care delivery
Home health care
Abstract
PURPOSE: To design a health care program that allows Alaska Natives to receive culturally appropriate health services in their homes, thus avoiding the trauma of institutionalization and significantly increasing the quality of the patient's life during the course of the treated illness. METHOD: Utilizing the culturally appropriate sensitivity that is found within Tribal Health Corporations, Southcentral Foundation is designing a federally based community health care model to bring health support services into the patient's home. Health Aides and Community Health Representatives play an important role in extending this model into an urban community setting. The cost of care is significantly reduced, as it is more cost-effective to keep patients in their own home environments rather than in institutions. RESULTS: Major outcomes for patients are increased cultural sensitivity to their needs, personal comfort, dignity, and care in their own home surroundings. Outcomes for the federal care system are significant savings and more efficient personalized health care.
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The evolution of community-based mental health services to the Labrador Inuit

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102221
Source
Pages 493-495 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
to do and are not runve enough to think it will be a simple process. LlHC is ready to accept the challenge and will proceed in the same orderly fashion as it has with other health care programs already undertaken. LIHC should be rec- ognized for its ever increasing expertise in health care
  1 document  
Author
Webb, M
Author Affiliation
Labrador Inuit Association, Nain, Labrador, Canada
Source
Pages 493-495 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Health care delivery
Health needs
Inuit
Labrador
Mental health
Abstract
The health status of the Labrador Inuit is worse than average Canadians. Problems include low income, unemployment, inadequate (1) education, (2) housing and (3) water and sewer infrastructure, alcohol and tobacco use, and family violence. The issue presently taking precedence is mental health. The Labrador Inuit are concerned with the consequences of poor mental health, suicide and suicide attempts, family violence and breakdown, child abuse and neglect, impacts of alcohol abuse within the family and community, and the high crime rates. The Labrador Inuit Health Commission (LIHC), the health affiliate of the Labrador Inuit Association (LIA), is mandated to implement plans to address these concerns. With funding from the Government of Canada, LUIC has begun to employ staff to work towards these self-identified needs. Funding is not easily assessable, and eligibility is an issue, but the funding and programs are moving in the right direction. The review documents problems in the Labrador Inuit communities, perceived needs of people, solutions they have outlined, and attempts to meet these needs.
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Source
Pages 665-667 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
of community and primary care activities that continues to work at the challenges of integration and coordination. This paper discusses some of the efforts to date and hopes for the future. Keywords: Southcentral Foundation; Alaska; Anchorage; Ala~ka Natives; Health promotion; Health care
  1 document  
Author
Eby, D.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA
Source
Pages 665-667 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Anchorage
Health care delivery
Health promotion
Southcentral Foundation
Abstract
The delivery of medical and health-related services tends to be compartmentalized and fragmented. If the goal is health and if an important part in achieving that goal is increasing the ability of the person, family, and community to care for themselves while providing cost-effective care, then it is imperative to integrate efforts across community and primary care arenas. The Southcentral Foundation is an Alaska Native organization focused on the delivery of community and primary care activities that continues to work at the challenges of integration and coordination. This paper discusses some of the efforts to date and hopes for the future.
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Patient perspectives on primary health care in rural communities: Effects of geography on access, continuity and efficiency

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101103
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2009 Jan-Mar;9(1):1142
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-Mar 2009
Author
Wong, ST
Regan, S
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2009 Jan-Mar;9(1):1142
Date
Jan-Mar 2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accessibility
British Columbia
Canada
Continuity of care
Continuity of information
Geographical location
Health care delivery
Health status
Patient perspective
Primary health care (PHC)
Rural communities
Socio-demographics
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Examining how to deliver primary health care (PHC) services and increase their accessibility (regardless of geographic location) from the patient's perspective is needed. We conducted seven focus groups with people (n = 50) living in rural communities, in British Columbia, Canada, as they reflected on priorities for and use of PHC.METHODS: In addition to discussing their priorities for PHC services, participants completed a brief questionnaire designed to collect information regarding socio-demographics, health status and utilization of primary healthcare providers. Descriptive statistics were obtained from questionnaire data. Focus group data were coded using an evaluation framework specifically developed for PHC; a thematic content analysis was then conducted on the coded data.RESULTS: In total, 80% of participants had been patients of the same provider for more than one year and had an average of two chronic conditions. Participants described the challenges posed by geographical location in terms of: (1) making tradeoffs; (2) management, information, and relationship continuity of care; and (3) efficiency with health care delivery. Additional out-of-pocket expenses were associated with traveling to regional centers for health services. Those living in rural communities, especially people needing additional health services to manage their health problems, made tradeoffs between their safety of having to travel during times of poor road conditions and having their healthcare needs met.CONCLUSION: Challenges to timely access to a regular healthcare provider, continuity of information and management of people's chronic disease conditions, and linkages to specialist services and diagnostic tests pose challenges for those living in rural communities. The geographic location of rural communities compounds the extent to which these people are able to access timely and continuous PHC.
PubMed ID
19298094 View in PubMed
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Quality development in health care in Greenland: facing unlikely odds

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2928
Source
Pages 668-670 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
presented, illustrating issues of validity and reliability, as well as specifying the areas of system and personnel development necessary to make this system functional. The author's perception of the generalized implications of the lessons learned to date is presented. Keywords: Greenland; Health care
  1 document  
Author
Steele, R.E.
Author Affiliation
Greenland Home Rule Government, Department of Health Research and Environment, Nuuk
Source
Pages 668-670 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Greenland
Health care delivery
Health care information
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
Health care in Greenland is historically founded on a fully tax-based system financed in large part by the Danish state. Administratively, the system was until 1992 under the Danish health authorities, with a concomitant lack of clarity concerning lines of communication in quality issues. Because of the enormous distance and communications problems, the individual districts were and continue to be run with a great deal of autonomy; and to this time the level of centralized data sources concerning qualitative aspects of the health care sector are extremely sparse. An attempt is being made to introduce a state-of-the-art centralized data collection and analysis function, with all that that entails in terms of system and personnel development. This system is described as a project, using an analysis of the official waiting-list database as a case study. The establishment and administration of the system is described. A cross-sectional analysis of the database is presented, illustrating issues of validity and reliability, as well as specifying the areas of system and personnel development necessary to make this system functional. The author's perception of the generalized implications of the lessons learned to date is presented.
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Self-determination: the panacea for Canadian aboriginal people with disabilities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2942
Source
Pages 719-724 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
provision in health transfer from the federal government to First Nation control are explored. Keywords: Canada; Indigenous peoples; Manitoba; Self-determination; Health care delivery; Disabilities INTRODUCTION The equalization of opportunities is the fo- cus of the current disability advocacy move
  1 document  
Author
Fricke, M.
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
Source
Pages 719-724 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Disabilities
Health care delivery
Indigenous peoples
Manitoba
Self-determination
Abstract
Equal access and participation issues are at the forefront of the current disability advocacy movement. Disabled people worldwide are demanding a change in attitudes and policies reflecting their inherent right as citizens to full participation in society. The inequalities faced by the Canadian Aboriginal community with disabilities are magnified by unique socioeconomic, political, environmental, and cultural barriers. The current rate of disability in the Canadian Aboriginal population (31%) is double the national rate. The existing system available to Aboriginal people with special needs has often resulted in an unaccountable and ineffective web of service delivery. This paper documents various aspects of the existing structure of service delivery and the potential barriers to independent living for adults with disabilities living in remote First Nations communities in Northern Manitoba, Canada. Possible advantages and drawbacks to service provision in health transfer from the federal governmentto First Nation control are explored.
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14 records – page 1 of 2.