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The 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder according to DSM-IV, DSM-V, and ICD-10 among nondemented 75-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124775
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Nilsson, J
Östling, S
Waern, M
Karlsson, B
SigstrÖm, R
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Nov;20(11):963-72
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phobic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To examine the 1-month prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10), and the overlap between these criteria, in a population sample of 75-year-olds. We also aimed to examine comorbidity between GAD and other psychiatric diagnoses, such as depression.
During 2005-2006, a comprehensive semistructured psychiatric interview was conducted by trained nurses in a representative population sample of 75-year-olds without dementia in Gothenburg, Sweden (N = 777; 299 men and 478 women). All psychiatric diagnoses were made according to DSM-IV. GAD was also diagnosed according to ICD-10 and DSM-V.
The 1-month prevalence of GAD was 4.1% (N = 32) according to DSM-IV, 4.5% (N = 35) according to DSM-V, and 3.7% (N = 29) according to ICD-10. Only 46.9% of those with DSM-IV GAD fulfilled ICD-10 criteria, and only 51.7% and 44.8% of those with ICD-10 GAD fulfilled DSM-IV/V criteria. Instead, 84.4% and 74.3% of those with DSM-IV/V GAD and 89.7% of those with ICD-10 GAD had depression. Also other psychiatric diagnoses were common in those with ICD-10 and DSM-IV GAD. Only a small minority with GAD, irrespective of criteria, had no other comorbid psychiatric disorder. ICD-10 GAD was related to an increased mortality rate.
While GAD was common in 75-year-olds, DSM-IV/V and ICD-10 captured different individuals. Current definitions of GAD may comprise two different expressions of the disease. There was greater congruence between GAD in either classification system and depression than between DSM-IV/V GAD and ICD-10 GAD, emphasizing the close link between these entities.
PubMed ID
22549369 View in PubMed
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[3 reports on population health. Who will take care of my health?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Oct 16;88(42):3443-6, 3451-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1991

3-Year follow-up of secondary chronic headaches: the Akershus study of chronic headache.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141854
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Kjersti Aaseth
Ragnhild Berling Grande
Jurate Ĺ altyte Benth
Christofer Lundqvist
Michael Bjørn Russell
Author Affiliation
Head and Neck Research Group, Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, 1478 Lørenskog, Norway. kjersti.aaseth@medisin.uio.no
Source
Eur J Pain. 2011 Feb;15(2):186-92
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Headache Disorders, Secondary - etiology - physiopathology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Norway
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Rhinitis - complications
Severity of Illness Index
Sinusitis - complications
Abstract
The objective was to investigate the 3-year course of secondary chronic headaches (?15days per month for at least 3months) in the general population. An age and gender stratified random sample of 30,000 persons aged 30-44years from the general population received a mailed questionnaire. All with self-reported chronic headache, 517 in total, were interviewed by neurological residents. The questionnaire response rate was 71%. The rate of participation in the initial and follow-up interview was 74% (633/852) and 87% (83/95) respectively. The International Classification of Headache Disorders was used, and then in the next step the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group and American Academy of Otolaryngology criteria were used in relation to cervicogenic headache (CEH) and headache attributed to chronic rhinosinusitis (HACRS). Of those followed-up, 40 had headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma (chronic posttraumatic headache), 0 had CEH and 0 had HACRS according to the ICHD-II criteria, while 18 had CEH according to the Cervicogenic Headache International Study Group's criteria, and 37 had HACRS according to the criteria of the American Academy of Otolaryngology. The headache index (frequency×intensity×duration) was significantly reduced from baseline to follow-up in chronic posttraumatic headache and HACRS, but not in CEH. We conclude that secondary chronic headaches seem to have various course dependent of subtype. Recognizing the different types of secondary chronic headaches is of importance because it might have management implications.
PubMed ID
20667753 View in PubMed
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A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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[10 years of dental caries prophylaxis in Varberg/Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41725
Source
Zahnarztl Mitt. 1978 Mar 1;68(5):259-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1978
Author
F. Rosenkranz
Source
Zahnarztl Mitt. 1978 Mar 1;68(5):259-61
Date
Mar-1-1978
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Humans
School Dentistry
Sweden
PubMed ID
273357 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of inflammatory bowel diseases-drug therapy, costs and adverse reactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71979
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P. Blomqvist
N. Feltelius
R. Löfberg
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Paul.Blomqvist@mep.ki.se
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescriptions, Drug - economics
Retrospective Studies
Steroids
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Drug therapy for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is based on anti-inflammatory and immunodulating drugs, nutritional support and surgical resection. Recently, new drugs have been introduced. AIM: To report drug prescriptions, costs and adverse reactions among inflammatory bowel disease patients in Sweden between 1988 and 1997. METHODS: Drug use was calculated from the national Diagnosis and therapy survey and drug costs from prescriptions and drug sales. Adverse drug reactions were obtained from the Medical Products Agency's National Pharmacovigilance system. RESULTS: The annual drug exposure for Crohn's disease was 0.55 million daily doses per million population, mainly supplementation and aminosalicylic acids. Mesalazine and olsalazine had 61% within this group. For ulcerative colitis patients, drug exposure was 0.61 million daily doses per million per year and aminosalicylic acids fell from 70% to 65%. For inflammatory bowel disease patients, corticosteroids and nutritional supplementation were common. The annual average cost for inflammatory bowel disease drugs was 7.0 million US dollars. Annually, 32 adverse drug reactions were reported, mainly haematological reactions such as agranulocytosis and pancytopenia (60%), followed by skin reactions. Only two deaths were reported. Aminosalicylic acids were the most commonly reported compounds. CONCLUSIONS: Drug use for inflammatory bowel disease in the pre-biologic agent era rested on aminosalicylic acid drugs and corticosteroids with stable levels, proportions and costs. The level of adverse drug reactions was low but haematological reactions support the monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease patients.
PubMed ID
11284775 View in PubMed
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10-year survival and quality of life in patients with high-risk pN0 prostate cancer following definitive radiotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94068
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Berg Arne
Lilleby Wolfgang
Bruland Oyvind Sverre
Fosså Sophie Dorothea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. arne.berg@radiumhospitalet.no
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2007 Nov 15;69(4):1074-83
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Erectile Dysfunction - physiopathology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - radiotherapy
Quality of Life
Radiotherapy, Conformal
Survival Analysis
Urination Disorders - physiopathology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate long-term overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), clinical progression-free survival (cPFS), and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following definitive radiotherapy (RT) given to T(1-4p)N(0)M(0) prostate cancer patients provided by a single institution between 1989 and 1996. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We assessed outcome among 203 patients who had completed three-dimensional conformal RT (66 Gy) without hormone treatment and in whom staging by lymphadenectomy had been performed. OS was compared with an age-matched control group from the general population. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of HRQoL was performed among surviving patients. RESULTS: Median observation time was 10 years (range, 1-16 years). Eighty-one percent had high-risk tumors defined as T(3-4) or Gleason score (GS) > or =7B (4+3). Among these, 10-year OS, CSS, and cPFS rates were 52%, 66%, and 39%, respectively. The corresponding fractions in low-risk patients (T(1-2) and GS or =7B.
PubMed ID
17703896 View in PubMed
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10-year trends in physical activity in the eastern Finnish adult population: relationship to socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233930
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Marti
J T Salonen
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In a large, community-based cardiovascular disease prevention study in Eastern Finland, independent random population samples were surveyed in 1972, 1977 and 1982. The leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), occupational physical activity (OPA), and socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics were assessed. In men and women aged 30-59, the proportion with high LTPA increased from 1972 to 1982 by approximately one half (p less than 0.001), whereas that of high OPA decreased during the same period (p less than 0.001). In both sexes, high overall physical activity fell from 1972 to 1977 (p less than 0.001), but no more from 1977 to 1982. The proportion of entirely sedentary remained stable. Education, income and younger age showed a positive, body mass index, smoking and OPA a graded, negative association with high LTPA in 1972 and 1982. Significant (p less than 0.001) differences in 10-year trends of changes in LTPA were observed: men and women with low education or income increased LTPA more than those with high education and income. Socioeconomic factors, such as income and education, appear to have lost importance as determinants of population-wide exercise, whereas the clustering of low physical activity with overweight and smoking has increased.
PubMed ID
3239447 View in PubMed
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12-month prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in the Swedish general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71618
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Per Carlbring
Henrik Gustafsson
Lisa Ekselius
Gerhard Andersson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Box 1225, Sweden.
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2002 May;37(5):207-11
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agoraphobia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Panic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the prevalence of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia according to DSM-IV criteria in the Swedish general population. METHOD: Data were obtained by means of a postal survey administrated to 1000 randomly selected adults. The panic disorder module of the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was included in the survey. RESULTS: 12-month prevalence was estimated at 2.2 % (CI 95 % 1.02 % - 3.38 %). There was a significant sex difference, with a greater prevalence for women (5.6 %) compared to men (1 %). CONCLUSION: The Swedish panic disorder prevalence is relatively consistent with findings in most other parts of the western world.
PubMed ID
12107711 View in PubMed
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5463 records – page 1 of 547.