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A 7-year prospective study of sense of humor and mortality in an adult county population: the HUNT-2 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140723
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sven Svebak
Solfrid Romundstad
Jostein Holmen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. sven.svebak@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Psychiatry Med. 2010;40(2):125-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Wit and Humor as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
To prospectively explore the significance of sense of humor for survival over 7 years in an adult county population.
Residents in the county of Nord-Trøndelag, Norway, aged 20 and older, were invited to take part in a public health survey during 1995-97 (HUNT-2), and 66,140 (71.2 %) participated. Sense of humor was estimated by responses to a cognitive (N = 53,546), social (N = 52,198), and affective (N = 53,132) item, respectively, taken from the Sense of Humor Questionnaire (SHQ). Sum scores were tested by Cox survival regression analyses applied to gender, age, and subjective health.
Hazard ratios were reduced with sense of humor (continuous scale: HR = 0.73; high versus low by median split: HR = 0.50) as contrasted with increase of HR with a number of classical risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular disease: HR = 6.28; diabetes: HR = 4.86; cancer: HR = 4.18; poor subjective health: HR = 2.89). Gender proved to be of trivial importance to the effect of sense of humor in survival. Subjective health correlated positively with sense of humor and therefore might have presented a spurious relation of survival with humor, but sense of humor proved to reduce HR both in individuals with poor and good subjective health. However, above age 65 the effect of sense of humor on survival became less evident.
Sense of humor appeared to increase the probability of survival into retirement, and this effect appeared independent of subjective health. Age under 65 mediated this effect, whereas it disappeared beyond this age.
PubMed ID
20848871 View in PubMed
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[10-year dynamics of attitude to health problems in the male population of Novosibirsk (epidemiological study based on the WHO MONICA program)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74937
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
V V Gafarov
V A Pak
I V Gagulin
T D Babina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2003;75(1):27-30
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
World Health Organization
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate changes for a decade in the attitude of men in Novosibirsk to health problems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: WHO program MONICA has covered males aged 25-64 years (a representative sample from the population in one of the districts of Novosibirsk city). A total of 3 trials were made (in 1984, 1988 and 1994) which included questioning, registration of ECG, arterial pressure, height, body mass, biochemical tests of the blood. RESULTS: Attitude of men to their health depended on their age. There was a trend to evaluate their health as more and more poor in men at the age of 25-43 and 35-44 years. In the group of 45-54-year-olds positive assessment of health was encountered 1.9 times more frequently, but the difference was not significant. At the age 55-64 years a growing number of men tend to assess their health as good. Since 1994 alcoholics among the elderly men grew in number as a response to the social and economic crisis. CONCLUSION: The change in health evaluation from negative to positive in older men may relate to less intensive work.
PubMed ID
12652951 View in PubMed
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Abnormal glucose regulation and gender-specific risk of fatal coronary artery disease in the HUNT 1 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127351
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erik Madssen
Lars Vatten
Tom Ivar Nilsen
Kristian Midthjell
Rune Wiseth
Ane Cecilie Dale
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - metabolism - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
To assess fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) by gender and glucose regulation status.
47,951 people were followed up according to fatal CAD identified in the National Cause of Death Registry. Gender-effects of fatal CAD in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), newly diagnosed diabetes (NDM) or known diabetes (KDM) compared with people with normal glucose regulation (NGR) were calculated using Cox regression.
Using NGR as reference, the hazard ratios (HR, 95% confidence intervals) associated with IGR was 1.2 (0.8-1.9) for women and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) for men. The corresponding HRs were 1.6 (1.2-2.2) and 1.4 (1.1.-1.9) for NDM, and 2.5 (2.1-2.8) and 1.8 (1.6-2.1) for KDM. The gender-difference in mortality varied by category (P(interaction) = 0.003). Using women as the reference, the HRs for men were 2.1 (2.0-2.3) for NGR, 1.8 (1.0-3.3) for IGR, 1.6 (1.0-2.5) for NDM, and 1.2 (1.0-1.5) for KDM.
Diabetes mellitus, but not IGR, was associated with fatal CAD in both genders. The known gender-difference in CAD mortality was attenuated in people with abnormal glucose regulation, evident already in people with IGR.
PubMed ID
22303857 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experience when interacting with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a brief note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157234
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alistair Campbell
Barbara Hayes
Beryl Buckby
Author Affiliation
James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. alistair.campbell@jcu.edu.au
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is one of the most widely used screening instruments for maternal perinatal anxiety and depression. It has maintained its robust performance when translated into multiple languages, when used prenatally and when used with perinatal fathers; thus the tool is also known as the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS). However, there have been no published psychometric data on versions of the EPDS adapted for screening Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. We describe the development of 'translations' of the EPDS and report their basic psychometric properties.
During the Queensland arm of the beyond blue National Postnatal Depression Program (2001-2005), partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were forged. At TAIHS' stand alone "Mums and Babies" unit 181 women of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent were recruited into the study through their antenatal and postnatal visits and 25 were recruited at Mt Isa. Participants completed either the translation or the standard version of the EPDS both antenatally and postnatally.
The 'translations' of the EPDS demonstrated a high level of reliability. The was a strong correlation between the 'translations' and the EPDS. The 'translations' and the standard EPDS both identified high rates of women at risk of depression although the 'translations' identified higher rates.
We argue that the 'translation' may have been a more accurate predictor of perinatal women at risk for depression, but acknowledge that a lack of validity evidence weakens this conclusion.
PubMed ID
18471181 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal participation in the DOVE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80691
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ralph-Campbell Kelli
Pohar Sheri L
Guirguis Lisa M
Toth Ellen L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Jul-Aug;97(4):305-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Consumer Participation
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Practice Guidelines
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Aboriginals constitute a substantial portion of the population of Northern Alberta. Determinants such as poverty and education can compound health-care accessibility barriers experienced by Aboriginals compared to non-Aboriginals. A diabetes care enhancement study involved the collection of baseline and follow-up data on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal patients with known type 2 diabetes in two rural communities in Northern Alberta. Analyses were conducted to determine any demographic or clinical differences existing between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. METHODS: 394 diabetes patients were recruited from the Peace and Keeweetinok Lakes health regions. 354 self-reported whether or not they were Aboriginal; a total of 94 self-reported being Aboriginal. Baseline and follow-up data were collected through interviews, standardized physical assessments, laboratory testing and self-reporting questionnaires (RAND-12 and HUI3). RESULTS: Aboriginals were younger, with longer duration of diabetes, more likely to be female, and less likely to have completed high school. At baseline, self-reported health status was uniformly worse, but the differences disappeared with adjustments for sociodemographic confounders, except for perceived mental health status. Aboriginals considered their mental health status to be worse than non-Aboriginals at baseline. Some aspects of health utilization were also different. DISCUSSION: While demographics were different and some utilization differences existed, overall this analysis demonstrates that "Aboriginality" does not contribute to diabetes outcomes when adjusted for appropriate variables.
PubMed ID
16967751 View in PubMed
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Abstinence, occasional drinking and binge drinking in middle-aged women. The Women's Health in Lund Area (WHILA) Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92823
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Rundberg Jenny
Lidfeldt Jonas
Nerbrand Christina
Samsioe Göran
Romelsjö Anders
Ojehagen Agneta
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund-Psychiatry, USIL, Lund UniversityHospital, Kioskgatan 19, 221 85 Lund, Sweden. jenny.rundberg@med.lu.se
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2008;62(3):186-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Social Environment
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although drinking patterns in women have received increased attention, few studies have focused on middle-aged women. Drinking patterns were investigated in a population sample of 513 Swedish women aged 50-59, and analysed in relation to social situation, and mental and physical health. The chi-square test was used to analyse differences in proportions. Variables showing significant differences were entered into a multivariate or multinomial logistic regression model. Abstainers and occasional drinkers had lower levels of education and more often regular medical control compared with weekly drinkers. Furthermore, abstainers more often had disability pension. Among women drinking alcohol, 56.6% affirmed binge drinking within the last year and 39.4% within the last month. Binge drinkers did not differ in terms of social situation, mental or physical health, compared with other drinkers. Drinking to relieve tension was affirmed by 7.2%. These women had more mental symptoms and less contact with friends compared with other drinkers; furthermore, they were more often binge drinkers. Binge drinking was common and health and social consequences of this drinking pattern in middle-aged women need to be further explored. Women drinking to relieve tension may need intervention for both drinking habits and mental health.
PubMed ID
18609026 View in PubMed
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Access to care, health status, and health disparities in the United States and Canada: results of a cross-national population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169088
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Karen E Lasser
David U Himmelstein
Steffie Woolhandler
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass, USA. klasser@challiance.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - utilization
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs - economics - standards - utilization
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage
Abstract
We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of medical services in the United States and Canada and compared disparities according to race, income, and immigrant status.
We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we used logistic regression to analyze country as a predictor of access to care, quality of care, and satisfaction with care and as a predictor of disparities in these measures.
In multivariate analyses, US respondents (compared with Canadians) were less likely to have a regular doctor, more likely to have unmet health needs, and more likely to forgo needed medicines. Disparities on the basis of race, income, and immigrant status were present in both countries but were more extreme in the United States.
United States residents are less able to access care than are Canadians. Universal coverage appears to reduce most disparities in access to care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16735628 View in PubMed
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Achilles tendon pain intensity and level of neovascularization in athletes as determined by color Doppler ultrasound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166800
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2007 Oct;17(5):530-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
W. van Snellenberg
J P Wiley
G. Brunet
Author Affiliation
Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2007 Oct;17(5):530-4
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries - ultrasonography
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Athletic Injuries - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - ultrasonography
Neovascularization, Pathologic
Pain - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Pain Measurement
Pilot Projects
Prevalence
Tendinopathy - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
The cause of pain in Achilles tendinopathy is thought to be related to the presence of neovascularization in the tendon as seen on color Doppler ultrasound. Asymptomatic pathology has been observed in patellar tendons of elite athletes. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of Achilles tendon pain and the characteristics of Achilles tendons in a young athletic population. Sixty-four varsity athletes underwent color Doppler ultrasound imaging to determine tendon thickness, presence of degeneration and neovascularization. The presence of swelling and tenderness was determined, and Achilles tendon pain was rated on three visual analogue scales (VAS) (pain during exercise, pain at rest, pain during daily activities) as well as on the VISA-A scale. Tendon symptoms were not related to the presence of neovascularization. There was a low prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy, tenderness, and neovascularization in this population. Neovascularization was seen in both a painful and a non-painful tendon.
PubMed ID
17076825 View in PubMed
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ACTION: application and extension of the GENESIS community analysis model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211809
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
C K Russell
D M Gregory
D. Wotton
E. Mordoch
M M Counts
Author Affiliation
College of Nursing, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38163, USA.
Source
Public Health Nurs. 1996 Jun;13(3):187-94
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Health Nursing
Cultural Diversity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Nursing
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
United States
Urban health
Abstract
GENESIS (General Ethnographic and Nursing Evaluation Studies In the State) is a tested and proven community analysis strategy that integrates ethnographic and epidemiologic data to arrive at a comprehensive, holistic description of the health of a community and its residents. Communities analyzed in most project GENESIS studies have been rural or semirural. ACTION (Assessing Communities Together in the Identification Of Needs) is an extension of the GENESIS community analysis model that was developed to meet the unique needs of community-level research and analysis in an urban, multicultural setting. Significant differences in the context in which the ACTION projects took place necessitated extensions in specific components of the GENESIS model. Application of the GENESIS model by the ACTION team is described. Based on the experiences with ACTION, recommendations are offered for future urban, multicultural community analysis projects.
PubMed ID
8677234 View in PubMed
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1662 records – page 1 of 167.