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866 records – page 1 of 87.

[Continued health inequalities in northeastern Gothenburg--time to rethink].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276293
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016;113
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Faraidoun Moradi
Marianne Olsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2016;113
Date
2016
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
26835695 View in PubMed
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[Proceedings of a French international meeting on social inequalities in health: states the situation, means, and framework for public health action aimed at reducing social inequalities in health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148393
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2009 Sep;16(3):85-8
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Maria De Koninck
Catherine Hébert
Author Affiliation
Université Laval et Réseau de recherche en santé des populations du Québec, Canada. maria.dekoninck@msp.ulaval.ca
Source
Glob Health Promot. 2009 Sep;16(3):85-8
Date
Sep-2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Public Health
Quebec
PubMed ID
19773307 View in PubMed
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A general method for decomposing the causes of socioeconomic inequality in health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289996
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:89-106
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Gawain Heckley
Ulf-G Gerdtham
Gustav Kjellsson
Author Affiliation
Health Economics & Management, Institute of Economic Research, Lund University, Box 117, 22100, Sweden; Health Economics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Medicon Village, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: Gawain.heckley@med.lu.se.
Source
J Health Econ. 2016 Jul; 48:89-106
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Income
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
We introduce a general decomposition method applicable to all forms of bivariate rank dependent indices of socioeconomic inequality in health, including the concentration index. The technique is based on recentered influence function regression and requires only the application of OLS to a transformed variable with similar interpretation. Our method requires few identifying assumptions to yield valid estimates in most common empirical applications, unlike current methods favoured in the literature. Using the Swedish Twin Registry and a within twin pair fixed effects identification strategy, our new method finds no evidence of a causal effect of education on income-related health inequality.
PubMed ID
27137844 View in PubMed
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Health Inequality--determinants and policies. Foreword.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117572
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(8 Suppl):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Finn Diderichsen
Ingelise Andersen
Celie Manuel
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Elsa Bach
Mikkel Baadsgaard
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Finn Kenneth Hansen
Bernard Jeune
Torben Jørgensen
Jes Søgaard
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Nov;40(8 Suppl):10-1
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Socioeconomic Factors
PubMed ID
23147862 View in PubMed
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Research, information and consent for the Australian Health Survey: a separate standard for Indigenous people? Comment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132569
Source
Med J Aust. 2011 Aug 1;195(3):158-9; author reply 159
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2011
Author
Kevin G Rowley
Alister H Thorpe
Source
Med J Aust. 2011 Aug 1;195(3):158-9; author reply 159
Date
Aug-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Notes
Comment On: Med J Aust. 2011 May 16;194(10):509-1021644895
PubMed ID
21806540 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gilles Paradis
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012 Jul-Aug;103(4):e241
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Public Health
Social Justice
PubMed ID
23618632 View in PubMed
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The health status of black Canadians: do aggregated racial and ethnic variables hide health disparities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149351
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009 Aug;20(3):817-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Patricia Rodney
Esker Copeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, USA.
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009 Aug;20(3):817-23
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Abstract
This paper examines the importance of collecting and reporting data on race and ethnicity in public health and biomedical research in Canada. Literature and available statistics related to social determinants of health were reviewed and analyzed to illustrate that minority populations in Canada, especially Blacks, are likely to experience poorer health outcomes. Statistics Canada in its commitment to multiculturalism uses broad categories such as visible minorities and racialised groups as surrogates for race and ethnicity. These categories, when used in health literature may conceal underlying inequities in health between population groups. Blacks and minority groups in Canada have higher rates of unemployment, lower rates of educational attainment, and lower socioeconomic status. Whenever Canadian data based on race and ethnic categories are reported, disparities are observed. The lack of disaggregated data may hide health disparities.
PubMed ID
19648707 View in PubMed
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Do we need to worry about the health effects of unemployment?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146716
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Jan;64(1):5-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
M. Bartley
J. Ferrie
Author Affiliation
ESRC International Centre for Life Course Studies, Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University College London, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK. m.bartley@ucl.ac.uk
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Jan;64(1):5-6
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Military Personnel
Mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment
Notes
Comment On: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Jan;64(1):22-819289388
PubMed ID
20007629 View in PubMed
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Feds to scrutinize health disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104222
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):E357
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2014
Author
Lauren Vogel
Author Affiliation
CMAJ.
Source
CMAJ. 2014 Jul 8;186(10):E357
Date
Jul-8-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Government Agencies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
24890106 View in PubMed
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Health-care access as a social determinant of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154706
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Elizabeth McGibbon
Josephine Etowa
Charmaine McPherson
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish , Nova Scotia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2008 Sep;104(7):22-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Nursing
Social Justice
Abstract
The social determinants of health (SDH) are recognized as important indicators of health and well-being. Health-care services (primary, secondary, tertiary care) have not until recently been considered an SDH. Inequities in access to health care are changing this view. These inequities include barriers faced by certain population groups at point of care, such as the lack of cultural competence of health-care providers. The authors show how a social justice perspective can help nurses understand how to link inequities in access to poorer health outcomes, and they call on nurses to break the cycle of oppression that contributes to these inequities.
PubMed ID
18856224 View in PubMed
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866 records – page 1 of 87.