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[12 points for better care for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218064
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 1;91(22):2206-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1994

Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123167
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:172
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andrew P Costa
Jeffrey W Poss
Thomas Peirce
John P Hirdes
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada. acosta@uwaterloo.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:172
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Acute Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bed Occupancy - statistics & numerical data
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Home Care Services - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - standards
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Discharge - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC) construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission.
Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC) from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days.
ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±14.6), psychiatric diagnosis (13?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±6.2), abusive behaviours (12?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±10.7), and stroke (7?day mean deviation, 99% CI?=?±5.0). Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles.
A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub-populations identified in this investigation to maximize effectiveness. Specifically, incentives should be introduced to encourage nursing homes to accept acute patients with the least prospect for community-based living, while acute patients with the greatest prospect for community-based living are discharged to transitional care or directly to community-based care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22726609 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national diabetes guidelines through monitoring quality indicators--A comparison of three types of care for the elderly with special emphasis on HbA1c.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271560
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ann-Sofie Nilsson Neumark
Lars Brudin
Thomas Neumark
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2015 Aug;9(4):253-60
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Home Care Services
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Hypoglycemic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Independent living
Male
Nursing Homes
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - standards
Prevalence
Process Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare adherence to Swedish guidelines for diabetes care between elderly people living at home with or without home health care, and residents of nursing homes.
Medical records of 277 elderly people aged 80 and older, with known diabetes in a Swedish municipality, were monitored using quality indicators to evaluate processes and outcomes.
Monitoring, in accordance to diabetes guidelines, of HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure and foot examinations was lower among residents of nursing homes (p
PubMed ID
25865853 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CHAC Rev. 1988 Sep;16(3):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
J M Larouche
Source
CHAC Rev. 1988 Sep;16(3):10-5
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Ethics, Medical
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
PubMed ID
10290006 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging in Canada: state of the art and science.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118526
Source
Gerontologist. 2013 Feb;53(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Debra J Sheets
Elaine M Gallagher
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, Victoria, V8W 2Y2, Canada. dsheets@uvic.ca
Source
Gerontologist. 2013 Feb;53(1):1-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
Public Policy
Universal Coverage
Abstract
Canada shares many similarities with other industrialized countries around the world, including a rapidly aging population. What sets Canada uniquely apart is the collaborative approach that has been enacted in the health care system and the aging research initiatives. Canada has tremendous pride in its publicly funded health care system that guarantees universal coverage for health care services on the basis of need, rather than ability to pay. It is also distinguished as a multicultural society that is officially bilingual. Aging research has developed rapidly over the past decade. In particular, the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging is one of the most comprehensive research platforms of its kind and is expected to change the landscape of aging research.
PubMed ID
23197394 View in PubMed
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Aging-related clinical and health services research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203999
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Nov;46(11):1469-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1998
Author
K. Rockwood
H. Bergman
D B Hogan
P. McCracken
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Nov;46(11):1469-72
Date
Nov-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Canada
Community Health Planning
Dementia - prevention & control
Forecasting
Geriatrics - education - standards
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
Research - education - organization & administration
Abstract
Research by Canadian geriatricians has grown significantly since the Canadian Society of Geriatric Medicine was founded in 1981. Most research has been clinical or related to health service use. More recently, the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) has proved an important focus for population-based research, and research on dementia. An increasing number of Canadian geriatricians have undertaken formal research training, and the CSHA study team and other groups are providing opportunities for multicentre, multidisciplinary, collaborative studies. These developments point to continued growth in research by Canadian geriatricians, most likely research with a clinical and population focus and employing multicenter designs.
PubMed ID
9809772 View in PubMed
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Are longer hospital stays beneficial for the elderly?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185480
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;6(2):52-5, 2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
M Suzanne Sheppard
Melanie R Rathgeber
Joanne M Franko
Diane M Treppel
Sharon E Card
Cordell O Neudorf
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK.
Source
Hosp Q. 2002;6(2):52-5, 2
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Benchmarking
Canada
Female
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hospital Bed Capacity
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
National Health Programs
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Utilization Review
Abstract
Utilization review is a way to manage healthcare costs and is widespread in Canada, as managers attempt to use available acute-care beds in a best practice manner. As we reduce beds and decrease length of stay, we often wonder if the outcomes for patients are affected, particularly if the patients are elderly.
PubMed ID
12737031 View in PubMed
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Association between multi-dose drug dispensing and drug treatment changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127314
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Jul;68(7):1095-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Christina Sjöberg
Henrik Ohlsson
Susanna M Wallerstedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, 431 80 Mölndal, Sweden. christina.a.sjoberg@vgregion.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Jul;68(7):1095-101
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - methods - standards
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Prescriptions - standards - statistics & numerical data
Drug Therapy - standards
Drug Utilization Review
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Hip Fractures - drug therapy
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
To compare drug treatment changes in older hip fracture patients with and without multi-dose drug dispensing (MDD) after discharge from hospital.
Hip fracture patients (aged 65 years or older) for whom the same prescribing procedure was used at discharge and at the 6-month follow-up were extracted from two patient cohorts consecutively recruited in 2008 (n = 100) and 2009 (n = 99), respectively. Of these hip fracture patients, 107 patients used MDD and 47 used ordinary prescriptions (OP) throughout the study period. Drug treatment was registered at discharge and at the 6-month follow-up. Each drug was classified as changed (withdrawn, dosage adjusted or added) or unchanged. The association between MDD and changes in drug treatment was analysed with generalised estimating equations (GEE). Age, sex, cognition, year of study and type of drug (fall-risk-increasing, fracture-preventing or other) were included in the model.
A total of 1,980 drugs were prescribed at discharge and at the 6-month follow-up to the 154 patients. Of the 1,413 drugs prescribed via MDD, 597 (43%) drugs were unchanged. The corresponding figure for drugs prescribed via OP was 166 out of 567 (29%) prescribed drugs. Analysis with GEE revealed an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.66 (1.20-2.31) to 1.77 (1.38-2.27) for a drug to be classified as unchanged when prescribed via the MDD system.
MDD is associated with fewer changes in drug treatment compared with OP. Further studies of risks and benefits from this prescribing procedure are urged.
PubMed ID
22307226 View in PubMed
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[Better geriatric health services--an election matter?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170267
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):349
Publication Type
Article
Author
Benny Ståhlberg
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Feb 8-14;103(6):349
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Health Policy
Health Services for the Aged - standards
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
16536036 View in PubMed
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141 records – page 1 of 15.