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355 records – page 1 of 36.

[20th anniversary of the Gerontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258679
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):209-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V N Anisimov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):209-12
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Aging
Anniversaries and Special Events
Geriatrics - methods
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Russia
Abstract
The overview on the establishment, main activities and results of The Gerontological Society of The Russian Academy of Sciences since March 1994.
PubMed ID
25306649 View in PubMed
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[A care program for dementia. Increased cooperation between health care and social service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1995
Author
L. Gustafson
A K Thulin
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Date
Jun-21-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Patient Care Planning
Social Support
Social Work
Sweden
PubMed ID
7637427 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Accountability, responsiveness and quality for clients model of home support: a model for improved home support services to promote aging at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146209
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Judy Kelly
Alison Orr
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Population Dynamics
Social Support
Abstract
As the proportion of older adults increases within the Canadian population, healthcare systems across the country are facing increased demands for home-based services, including home care nursing, rehabilitation, case management, adult day programs, respite, meal programs and home support. Home support is one of the core care services required in the community to enable older adults to remain at home as long as possible. In 2006, Vancouver Community introduced a new home support delivery and performance management model: the Accountability, Responsiveness and Quality for Clients Model of Home Support (ARQ Model) (VCH 2006). The main components of the ARQ Model are an expanded use of "cluster care" along with stable monthly funding for high-density buildings and neighbourhoods; the introduction of specific monthly and quarterly quality performance reporting; and the implementation of performance-based funding for home support. This article discusses the setup of the ARQ model, its ongoing evaluation and results achieved thus far.
PubMed ID
20057219 View in PubMed
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Acute hospital use, nursing home placement, and mortality in a frail community-dwelling cohort managed with Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123476
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Ted Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of British Columbia and Island Medical Program, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. trosenberg@gem-health.com
Source
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jul;60(7):1340-6
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Demography
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Frail Elderly
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mortality - trends
Nursing Homes - utilization
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of medical Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home (PIECH) on acute hospital use and mortality in a frail elderly population.
Comparison of acute hospital care use for the year before entering the practice (pre-entry) with the most-recent 12-month period (May 1, 2010-April 30, 2011, postentry) for active and discharged patients.
Community.
All 248 frail elderly adults enrolled in the practice for at least 12 months who were living in the community and not in nursing homes in Victoria, British Columbia.
Primary geriatric care provided by a physician, nurse, and physiotherapist in participants' homes.
Acute hospital admissions, emergency department (ED) contacts that did not lead to admission, reason for leaving practice, and site of death.
There was a 39.7% (116 vs 70; P = .004) reduction in hospital admissions, 37.6% (1,700 vs 1,061; P = .04) reduction in hospital days, and 20% (120 vs 95; P = .20) reduction in ED contacts after entering the practice. Fifty participants were discharged from the practice, 64% (n = 32) of whom died, 20% (n = 10) moved, and 16% (n = 8) were admitted to nursing homes. Fifteen (46.9%) deaths occurred at home.
Primary Integrated Interdisciplinary Elder Care at Home may reduce acute hospital admissions and facilitate home deaths.
PubMed ID
22694020 View in PubMed
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Source
Infirm Can. 1983 May;25(5):14-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983

[A department for less serious emergencies but with heavy nursing needs. Increased cooperation resulted in shorter length of stay].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217706
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2764-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994

Age and sex of caregivers. Missing pieces in the analysis of long-term care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218260
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 May;40:963-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
V I Tarman
Author Affiliation
Wellesley Hospital, University of Toronto.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 May;40:963-70
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Family Characteristics
Female
Gender Identity
Health Care Reform
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Sex Factors
Women's health
Abstract
Expanding community care for elderly persons is a pivotal issue in the reform of long-term care. However, the age and sex of caregivers are important concerns that, unless confronted, will undermine the success of these reforms.
Notes
Cites: Gerontologist. 1983 Dec;23(6):619-256662376
Cites: Gerontologist. 1987 Oct;27(5):616-262960595
Cites: Milbank Q. 1986;64(1):34-753084932
PubMed ID
8038639 View in PubMed
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355 records – page 1 of 36.