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1447 records – page 1 of 145.

[10,850 general practice consultations with elderly patients. From diagnosis-prescription-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72639
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
K. Rokstad
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3980-4
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. Participation was close to 100%. We report data from 10,850 surgery consultations with elderly patients (65 years and older). 60% of the consultations involved female patients, and 58% of the patients were 65-74 years old. New diagnoses were made in one-third of the cases; two-thirds were follow-ups. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (28%), musculoskeletal (13%), psychiatric (8%) and respiratory diseases (8%). Almost 10% of all consultations were for hypertension. Drugs were prescribed in 45% of all cases. 27% of all prescriptions were for cardiovascular drugs, and 25% were for drugs for the nervous system. The 20 most common diagnoses made up more than half of the total number of diagnoses. Almost 70% of all prescriptions were for the ten most common therapeutic groups.
PubMed ID
9441427 View in PubMed
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[12 points for better care for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218064
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jun 1;91(22):2206-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1994

[20th anniversary of the Gerontological Society of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258679
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):209-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
V N Anisimov
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(2):209-12
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Aging
Anniversaries and Special Events
Geriatrics - methods
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Russia
Abstract
The overview on the establishment, main activities and results of The Gerontological Society of The Russian Academy of Sciences since March 1994.
PubMed ID
25306649 View in PubMed
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[1384 house calls to elderly patients in family practice. From diagnosis-prescriptions-examination in Møre and Romsdal]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72638
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3984-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1997
Author
J. Straand
H. Sandvik
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for allmennmedisin, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Nov 10;117(27):3984-7
Date
Nov-10-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Over a period of two months in 1988 and 1989 all general practitioners in the Norwegian county of Møre and Romsdal recorded all contacts with their patients. We report data from 1,384 house calls to elderly patients (65 years and older). House calls made up 11.3% of all face-to-face contacts between general practitioners and elderly patients. 59% of the visits were to female patients, and 60% were to patients 75 years and older. 23% of the house calls took place during weekends, and new diagnoses were made in 58% of the cases. The most common groups of diagnoses were cardiovascular (21%), respiratory (16%), and musculoskeletal diseases (13%). Drugs were prescribed for 42% of the house calls. 28% of all drugs prescribed were for the nervous system, while 26% were antibiotics for systemic use. Most house calls were made because of acute illnesses. Our results suggest that preventive home visits to the elderly are rarely, if ever, performed in general practice.
PubMed ID
9441428 View in PubMed
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Abdominal symptoms, visits to the doctor, and medicine consumption among the elderly. A population based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73151
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
L. Kay
Author Affiliation
Medical Department C, Glostrup County Hospital.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1994 Sep;41(4):466-9
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Pain - drug therapy - epidemiology - therapy
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Therapy - utilization
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Humans
Male
Office Visits - utilization
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Abdominal symptoms are frequent in the normal elderly population, but only a minority contact doctors. The present study was performed to assess the impact of abdominal symptoms on primary health care and medicine consumption and, in addition, to describe factors that relate to resource consumption. A postal questionnaire was mailed to a random cohort of 859 Danish people at the age of 75. Seventy-nine percent returned the questionnaire. A total of 31% of the men and 42% of the women had experienced at least one abdominal symptom within the past year. Among these 25% had visited a doctor and a little less had taken medicine. The total expenses used on primary health care and medicine were 22,000 U.S. Dollars per 1000 persons. Factors related to visiting a doctor were not only the presence of symptoms but also the subject's concept of the symptom as a health problem. As a consequence, efforts to control expenses should also focus on why some subjects consider their symptoms a health-problem while others do not.
PubMed ID
7813253 View in PubMed
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[Abolish compulsory military service and introduce compulsory social service]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90918
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Nov 5-11;105(45):3214
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ekengren Björn
Author Affiliation
Saltsjöbadens vårdcentral. bjornekengren@hotmail.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Nov 5-11;105(45):3214
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Child
Child Welfare
Community Health Services
Geriatric Nursing
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Social Work
Sweden
PubMed ID
19062614 View in PubMed
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[A care program for dementia. Increased cooperation between health care and social service].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1995
Author
L. Gustafson
A K Thulin
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset, Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 21;92(25):2574, 2577
Date
Jun-21-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Patient Care Planning
Social Support
Social Work
Sweden
PubMed ID
7637427 View in PubMed
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Accessing timely rehabilitation services for a global aging society? Exploring the realities within Canada's universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145394
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michel D Landry
Sudha Raman
Elham Al-Hamdan
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Curr Aging Sci. 2010 Jul;3(2):143-50
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
National health programs - organization & administration
Organizational Objectives
Physical Therapy Modalities - organization & administration
Private Sector - organization & administration
Public Sector - organization & administration
Time Factors
World Health
Abstract
The proportion of older persons is increasing in developed and developing countries: this aging trend can be viewed as a two-edged sword. On the one hand, it represents remarkable successes regarding advances in health care; and on the other hand, it represents a considerable challenge for health systems to meet growing demand. A growing disequilibrium between supply and demand may be particularly challenging within publicly funding health systems that 'guarantee' services to eligible populations. Rehabilitation, including physical therapy, is a service that if provided in a timely manner, can maximize function and mobility for older persons, which may in turn optimize efficiency and effectiveness of overall health care systems. However, physical therapy services are not considered an insured service under the legislative framework of the Canadian health system, and as such, a complex public/private mix of funding and delivery has emerged. In this article, we explore the consequences of a public/private mix of physical therapy on timely access to services, and use the World Health Organization (WHO) health system performance framework to assess the extent to which the emerging system influences the goal of aggregated and equitable health. Overall, we argue that a shift to a public/private mix may not have positive influences at the population level, and that innovative approaches to deliver services would be desirable to strengthening rather than weaken the publicly funded system. We signal that strategies aimed at scaling up rehabilitation interventions are required in order to improve health outcomes in an evolving global aging society.
PubMed ID
20158495 View in PubMed
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Accountability, responsiveness and quality for clients model of home support: a model for improved home support services to promote aging at home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146209
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Judy Kelly
Alison Orr
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):65-71; discussion 79-83
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Population Dynamics
Social Support
Abstract
As the proportion of older adults increases within the Canadian population, healthcare systems across the country are facing increased demands for home-based services, including home care nursing, rehabilitation, case management, adult day programs, respite, meal programs and home support. Home support is one of the core care services required in the community to enable older adults to remain at home as long as possible. In 2006, Vancouver Community introduced a new home support delivery and performance management model: the Accountability, Responsiveness and Quality for Clients Model of Home Support (ARQ Model) (VCH 2006). The main components of the ARQ Model are an expanded use of "cluster care" along with stable monthly funding for high-density buildings and neighbourhoods; the introduction of specific monthly and quarterly quality performance reporting; and the implementation of performance-based funding for home support. This article discusses the setup of the ARQ model, its ongoing evaluation and results achieved thus far.
PubMed ID
20057219 View in PubMed
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1447 records – page 1 of 145.