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269 records – page 1 of 27.

Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
D J Weinkauf
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1997 Jun;43:1047-8
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice - manpower
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Primary Health Care - manpower
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1997 Apr;43:677-83, 7339111984
PubMed ID
9189287 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to kidney transplantation: the limitations of our current understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160974
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
John S Gill
Olwyn Johnston
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia - Canada. jgill@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors
Patient Selection
Registries
Renal Insufficiency - epidemiology - surgery
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Since kidney transplantation (KTX) is the preferred means of treating kidney failure, ensuring that all patients who may benefit from KTX have equal access to this scarce resource is an important objective. Studies focusing on this issue will become increasingly important as the gap between the demand and supply of organs continues to increase, and changes to the United Network of Organ Sharing organ allocation policy are actively debated. However, it is clear that current methods used to study access to KTX have serious limitations. This review highlights the shortcomings of the methods currently used to assess access to KTX, and the limitations of registry data and national wait-list data as information sources to study patient access to KTX. The review also provides suggestions for research and analytical approaches that might be utilized to improve our future understanding of patient access to KTX. The information provided will aid the reader to critically assess issues related to patient access to KTX.
PubMed ID
17918132 View in PubMed
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Accounting for variation in hospital outcomes: a cross-national study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201687
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1999 May-Jun;18(3):256-9
Publication Type
Article

Accuracy and consistency of quadratic odds estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225712
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
B W Smith
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing 48824.
Source
Fam Pract. 1991 Sep;8(3):269-75
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Michigan - epidemiology
Models, Statistical
Odds Ratio
Office Visits
Ontario
Probability
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
In medical practices that do not have rosters, only the number of patients who come to the practice can be enumerated: the number who might have visited if they had had a reason to do so remains unknown. The Quadratic Odds Estimator is a technique for estimating the total number of patients cared for by a primary care medical practice, including the non-visitors. A revised version of the model is shown to have an error of less than 1% in predicting the number of patients at risk of visiting a primary care medical practice. Aggregate and sex-specific estimates of total practice size are shown to be comparable to within 2%. The model estimates the prevalence of hypertension among the patients of two family practice resdencies as 18 and 11%. The rationale for employing unconventional regression weights and dual regressions is explained.
PubMed ID
1959728 View in PubMed
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An analytical framework for immunization programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175852
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Mar 31;23(19):2470-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2005
Author
L J Erickson
P. De Wals
L. Farand
Author Affiliation
Département d'administration de la santé, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Canada. lonny.erickson@aetmis.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Vaccine. 2005 Mar 31;23(19):2470-6
Date
Mar-31-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Immunization Programs
Abstract
Recent years have seen an increase in the number of new vaccines available on the Canadian market, and increasing divergence in provincial and territorial immunization programs as jurisdictions must choose among available health interventions with limited funding. We present an analytical framework, which we have developed to assist in the analysis and comparison of potential immunization programs. The framework includes 58 criteria classified into 13 categories, including the burden of disease, vaccine characteristics and immunization strategy, cost-effectiveness, acceptability, feasibility, and evaluability of program, research questions, equity, ethical, legal and political considerations. To date this framework has been utilized in a variety of different contexts, such as to structure expert presentations and reports and to examine the degree of consensus and divergence among experts, and to establish priorities. It can be transformed for a variety of other uses such as educating health professionals and the general public about immunization.
PubMed ID
15752833 View in PubMed
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An efficient paradigm for genetic epidemiology cohort creation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138913
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e14045
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Martin Ladouceur
William D Leslie
Zari Dastani
David Goltzman
J Brent Richards
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(11):e14045
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
DNA - isolation & purification
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology - economics - methods
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - complications - epidemiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - genetics
Reproducibility of Results
Saliva - metabolism
Abstract
Development of novel methodologies to efficiently create large genetic epidemiology cohorts is needed. Here we describe a rapid, precise and cost-efficient method for collection of DNA from cases previously experiencing an osteoporotic fracture by identifying cases using and administrative health-care databases. Over the course of 14 months we collected DNA from 1,130 women experiencing an osteoporotic fracture, at a cost of $54 per sample. This cohort is among the larger DNA osteoporotic fracture collections in the world. The novel method described addresses a major unmet health care research need and is widely applicable to any disease that can be identified accurately through administrative data.
Notes
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2003;81(9):646-5614710506
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2004 Jan;15(1):38-4214593451
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2006 May;367(1-2):81-516388788
Cites: Med Care. 2006 May;44(5):471-716641666
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2010 Aug;21(8):1317-2219802507
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;92(1):77-8117032716
Cites: Am J Hum Biol. 2007 May-Jun;19(3):319-2617421001
Cites: Lancet. 2008 May 3;371(9623):1505-1218455228
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2009;9:7119874586
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006 Sep;15(9):1742-516985039
PubMed ID
21124974 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological approach towards measuring the trade-off between equity and efficiency in health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212666
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
L. Lindholm
M. Rosén
M. Emmelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research - methods
Health status
Humans
Models, Economic
Pilot Projects
Politics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Social Class
Social Justice - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
The concept of social welfare functions has been discussed in health economic literature, as it provides a way of examining the extent to which society is prepared to accept a trade-off between efficiency and equity. In this paper requirements for meaningful empirical estimates of the willingness to accept lower per capita health status in order to achieve greater equity are examined. Results from a pilot study aimed at testing the proposed measurement procedure are reported. They show that at least two thirds of the politicians who participated are prepared to accept a lower growth in per capita health in exchange for increased equity. Accordingly, we found a weak empirical support for the common health economic assumption that only total health benefit should guide the use of resources.
PubMed ID
10157398 View in PubMed
Less detail

An introduction to multilevel regression models.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194799
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):150-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
P C Austin
V. Goel
C. van Walraven
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, G-160, 2075 Bayview Avenue, North York, ON, M4N 3M5. peter.austin@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):150-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Normal Distribution
Ontario
Poisson Distribution
Predictive value of tests
Regression Analysis
Abstract
Data in health research are frequently structured hierarchically. For example, data may consist of patients nested within physicians, who in turn may be nested in hospitals or geographic regions. Fitting regression models that ignore the hierarchical structure of the data can lead to false inferences being drawn from the data. Implementing a statistical analysis that takes into account the hierarchical structure of the data requires special methodologies. In this paper, we introduce the concept of hierarchically structured data, and present an introduction to hierarchical regression models. We then compare the performance of a traditional regression model with that of a hierarchical regression model on a dataset relating test utilization at the annual health exam with patient and physician characteristics. In comparing the resultant models, we see that false inferences can be drawn by ignoring the structure of the data.
PubMed ID
11338155 View in PubMed
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Application of the development stages of a cluster randomized trial to a framework for valuating complex health interventions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189408
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2002 Jul 11;2(1):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-2002
Author
Mark B Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. loebm@mcmaster.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2002 Jul 11;2(1):13
Date
Jul-11-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cluster analysis
Critical Pathways
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Nursing Homes - standards - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Staff - education
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Urinary Tract Infections - drug therapy - nursing - urine
Abstract
Trials of complex health interventions often pose difficult methodologic challenges. The objective of this paper is to assess the extent to which the various development steps of a cluster randomized trial to optimize antibiotic use in nursing homes are represented in a recently published framework for the design and evaluation of complex health interventions. In so doing, the utility of the framework for health services researchers is evaluated.
Using the five phases of the framework (theoretical, identification of components of the intervention, definition of trial and intervention design, methodological issues for main trial, promoting effective implementation), corresponding stages in the development of the cluster randomized trial using diagnostic and treatment algorithms to optimize the use of antibiotics in nursing homes are identified and described.
Synthesis of evidence needed to construct the algorithms, survey and qualitative research used to define components of the algorithms, a pilot study to assess the feasibility of delivering the algorithms, methodological issues in the main trial including choice of design, allocation concealment, outcomes, sample size calculation, and analysis are adequately represented using the stages of the framework.
The framework is a useful resource for researchers planning a randomized clinical trial of a complex intervention.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Jul 5;284(1):60-710872014
Cites: CMAJ. 2000 Aug 8;163(3):273-710951723
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1985 Oct;145(10):1804-73929707
Cites: Infect Control. 1986 Nov;7(11):538-453536783
Cites: Am J Med. 1986 Dec;81(6):979-823799658
Cites: Am J Med. 1987 Jul;83(1):27-333300325
Cites: Am J Infect Control. 1990 Jun;18(3):151-92363537
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1990 Nov;34(11):2193-92073110
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1991 Feb;35(2):256-82024958
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1993 Feb;36(2):195-2008426139
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 1993 Jan;16(1):75-818448322
Cites: Am J Med. 1993 Jun;94(6):611-88506887
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1994 May 15;120(10):827-337818631
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1994 May;9(5):278-828046531
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Oct;42(10):1062-97930330
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Feb 1;273(5):408-127823387
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1994 Nov;15(11):703-97852726
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 May 15;122(10):749-547717597
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Cites: Aging (Milano). 1996 Apr;8(2):113-228737610
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1997 Mar 1;126(5):376-809054282
Cites: Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1997 Sep;11(3):647-629378928
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Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jul 25;317(7153):273-69677226
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Feb 10;281(6):517-2310022107
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Mar 13;318(7185):711-510074018
Cites: Int J Antimicrob Agents. 1999 May;11(3-4):265-810394981
Cites: Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;21(8):537-4510968724
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Cites: BMJ. 2000 Sep 16;321(7262):694-610987780
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2001 Jun;16(6):376-8311422634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1983 Dec 8;309(23):1420-56633618
Cites: Infect Control. 1984 Apr;5(4):173-66562089
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1985 Jun;14(2):322-64019000
PubMed ID
12110157 View in PubMed
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Approaching Etuaptmumk - introducing a consensus-based mixed method for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263112
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
Ross Baker
Astrid Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pabrum
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
532688
Keywords
Cold Climate
Consensus
Health Services Research/methods
Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups/ethnology
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Abstract
With the recognized need for health systems' improvements in the circumpolar and indigenous context, there has been a call to expand the research agenda across all sectors influencing wellness and to recognize academic and indigenous knowledge through the research process. Despite being recognized as a distinct body of knowledge in international forums and across indigenous groups, examples of methods and theories based on indigenous knowledge are not well documented in academic texts or peer-reviewed literature on health systems. This paper describes the use of a consensus-based, mixed method with indigenous knowledge by an experienced group of researchers and indigenous knowledge holders who collaborated on a study that explored indigenous values underlying health systems stewardship. The method is built on the principles of Etuaptmumk or two-eyed seeing, which aim to respond to and resolve the inherent conflicts between indigenous ways of knowing and the scientific inquiry that informs the evidence base in health care. Mixed methods' frameworks appear to provide a framing suitable for research questions that require data from indigenous knowledge sources and western knowledge. The nominal consensus method, as a western paradigm, was found to be responsive to embedding of indigenous knowledge and allowed space to express multiple perspectives and reach consensus on the question at hand. Further utilization and critical evaluation of this mixed methodology with indigenous knowledge are required.
PubMed ID
26004427 View in PubMed
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269 records – page 1 of 27.