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[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
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Ability to estimate oral health status and treatment need in elderly receiving home nursing--a comparison between a dental hygienist and a dentist.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62818
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Nederfors
G. Paulsson
R. Isaksson
B. Fridlund
Author Affiliation
Oral Health Centre, Central Hospital, Halmstad, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 2000;24(3):105-16
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Dental Care for Aged - methods - statistics & numerical data
Dental Hygienists - statistics & numerical data
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Diagnosis, Oral - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Home Care Services - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Observer Variation
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the estimation ability of a dental hygienist to that of a dentist when, independently, recording the oral health status and treatment need in a population of elderly, receiving home nursing. Seventy-three persons, enrolled in a home nursing long-time care programme, were recruited. For the oral examination a newly developed protocol with comparatively blunt measurement variables was used. The oral examination protocol was tested for construct validity and for internal consistency reliability. Statistical analyses were performed using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test for testing differences, while inter-examiner agreement was estimated by calculating the kappa-values. Comparing the two examiners, good agreement was demonstrated for all mucosal recordings, colour, form, wounds, blisters, mucosal index, and for the palatal but not the lingual mucosa. For the latter, the dental hygienist recorded significantly more changes. The dental hygienist also recorded significantly higher plaque index values. Also regarding treatment intention and treatment need, the dental hygienist's estimation was somewhat higher. In conclusion, when comparing the dental hygienist's and the dentist's ability to estimate oral health status, treatment intention, and treatment need, some differences were observed, the dental hygienist tending to register "on the safe side", calling attention to the importance of inter-examiner calibration. However, for practical purpose the inter-examiner agreement was acceptable, constituting a promising basis for future out-reach activities.
PubMed ID
11061208 View in PubMed
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Accessibility of Norwegian dental services according to family income from 1977 to 1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75798
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Grytten
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;20(1):1-5
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income
Logistic Models
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Tooth Extraction - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Abstract
During the last 10-20 yr there has been a marked increase in demand for dental services in most western countries. An important issue is how this increase in demand has influenced inequalities in use of services among different income groups in the population. It is of particular interest to study this in Norway, as almost all the costs for dental care among adults are borne by the patient. The aim of the present study was to examine how the effect of family income on demand for dental services has changed over time. The analyses were performed on three sets of national data from 1977, 1983, and 1989. The samples were representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population aged 20 yr and above. Inequalities in use of dental services among different income groups have decreased between 1977 and 1989. However, separate analyses on the data from 1989 showed that some inequalities still exist. A non-selective subsidizing policy for dental care is unlikely to have any great effect in reducing these inequalities. Subsidized dental care is likely to raise the total amount of dental care demanded. However, it is difficult to assess accurately the size of this increase as the elasticity of demand for dental care in Norway with respect to price is unknown.
PubMed ID
1547604 View in PubMed
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Access to ambulatory care for American Indians and Alaska Natives; the relative importance of personal and community resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6151
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Feb;40(3):393-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
P J Cunningham
L J Cornelius
Author Affiliation
Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Rockville, MD 20852.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Feb;40(3):393-407
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - ethnology
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Female
Health Care Reform - standards
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Health
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Least-Squares Analysis
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The debate on health care reform in the United States has been greatly influenced by various national studies showing a strong relationship between lack of public or private health care coverage and inadequate access to health services. There is also much concern about deficiencies in the availability and delivery of services to certain population groups--especially for those living in the most remote and sparsely populated areas of the country. However, national studies have generally not demonstrated that the use of health services is strongly associated with urban/rural residence or the supply of medical providers. In this study, we show that national studies can obscure the problems of certain population groups including American Indians and Alaska Natives. Using data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, the findings show that the availability of medical providers as well as place of residence were strongly associated with the use of health care by American Indians and Alaska Natives. Although American Indians and Alaska Natives included in this study were eligible to receive health care free of charge from the Indian Health Service (IHS), financial factors were also significantly associated with use due to the use of services other than those provided or sponsored by IHS. Also, the results show that while geographic and supply factors have only modest effects on the average travel time to medical providers for the U.S. population as a whole, travel times are dramatically longer for American Indians and Alaska Natives living in rural areas and where there are few medical providers. In addition, there appear to be fewer hospitalizations in areas where there are IHS outpatient services. We conclude by discussing the need for health care reform to take into account the diversity of a large country such as the U.S., and the special needs of population groups that are usually not adequately represented in national studies.
PubMed ID
7899951 View in PubMed
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[Acute abdomen calls for considerable care resources. Analysis of 3727 in-patients in the county of Stockholm during the first quarter of 1995]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72078
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Sep 13;97(37):4008-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-13-2000
Author
G. Fenyö
M. Boijsen
L. Enochsson
M. Goldinger
S. Gröndal
P. Lundquist
I. Meldahl
M. Nilsson
U. Wenger
Author Affiliation
Kirurgiska kliniken, Södersjukhuset g.fenyo@telia.com
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Sep 13;97(37):4008-12
Date
Sep-13-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen, Acute - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Abdominal Pain - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - trends
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Medical Illustration
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Surgery Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Workload
Abstract
A total of 3,727 in-patients with acute abdominal symptoms were identified during the first quarter of 1995 at the surgical clinics of the nine hospitals with emergency departments in the county of Stockholm. The diagnoses were: non-specific abdominal pain 24%; cholecystitis 9%; appendicitis 8%; bowel obstruction 7%; intra-abdominal malignancy, diseases of the urinary tract and peptic ulcer 6% each; gastrointestinal hemorrhage, diverticulitis of the colon and pancreatitis 5% each; other diseases as a cause of abdominal symptoms, 19%. 1,601 operations were performed of which 47% were endoscopic procedures. The mean duration of hospital stay was 4.8 days. The length of stay increased significantly with age. The age-related relative frequency of hospitalization due to acute abdominal pain was also dramatically higher in the elderly cohorts. These facts and the prognosis of an 18% increase of inhabitants 50 years of age or older until 2010 in Greater Stockholm signal an increased need of hospital resources for this large group of patients in the coming years.
PubMed ID
11036359 View in PubMed
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Acute chest pain - a prospective population based study of contacts to Norwegian emergency medical communication centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132799
Source
BMC Emerg Med. 2011;11:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Robert Anders Burman
Erik Zakariassen
Steinar Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Emergency Primary Health Care, Uni Health, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway. robert.burman@uni.no
Source
BMC Emerg Med. 2011;11:9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Decision Trees
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Triage - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Acute chest pain is a frequently occurring symptom in patients with medical emergencies and imposes potentially life threatening situations outside hospitals. Little is known about the epidemiology of patients with acute chest pain in a primary care setting in Norway, and we aimed to obtain more representative data on such patients using data from emergency medical communication centres (EMCCs).
Data were collected prospectively during three months in 2007 from three EMCCs, covering 816 000 inhabitants. The EMCCs gathered information on every situation that was triaged as a red response (defined as an "acute" response, with the highest priority), according to the Norwegian Index of Medical Emergencies. Records from ambulances and primary care doctors were subsequently collected. International Classification of Primary Care - 2 symptom codes and The National Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) System scores were assigned retrospectively. Only chest pain patients were included in the study.
5 180 patients were involved in red response situations, of which 21% had chest pain. Estimated rate was 5.4 chest pain cases per 1000 inhabitants per year. NACA-scores indicated that 26% of the patients were in a life-threatening medical situation. Median prehospital response time was 13 minutes; an ambulance reached the patient in less than 10 minutes in 30% of the cases. Seventy-six per cent of the patients with chest pain were admitted to a hospital for further investigation, 14% received final treatment at a casualty clinic, while 10% had no further investigation by a doctor ("left at the scene").
The majority of patients with acute chest pain were admitted to a hospital for further investigation, but only a quarter of the patients were assessed prehospitally to have a severe illness. This sheds light on the challenges for the EMCCs in deciding the appropriate level of response in patients with acute chest pain. Overtriage is to some extent both expected and desirable to intercept all patients in need of immediate help, but it is also well known that overtriage is resource demanding. Further research is needed to elucidate the challenges in the diagnosis and management of chest pain outside hospitals.
Notes
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1994 Nov;24(5):867-727978559
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Dec 2;124(23):3058-6015586187
Cites: Am Fam Physician. 2005 Nov 15;72(10):2012-2116342831
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2006 Mar;23(3):232-516498168
Cites: Prehosp Emerg Care. 2007 Apr-Jun;11(2):192-817454806
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):324-814963502
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Apr 16;129(8):738-4219373298
Cites: Acta Cardiol. 2009 Apr;64(2):259-6519476121
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2010;18:920167060
Cites: Fam Pract. 2001 Dec;18(6):586-911739341
Cites: Resuscitation. 2008 Sep;78(3):298-30618562077
PubMed ID
21777448 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
E. Rea
G. Thompson
M E Moffatt
T K Young
J. O'Neil
A. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Dental Health Services - organization & administration
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In 1990, as part of a major health status assessment, a dental survey was carried out on a 20 per cent random sample of the adult population in the Keewatin region of the Northwest Territories. A 73 per cent response rate was obtained. Of the 397 people examined, 334 (88 per cent) identified themselves as Inuit. More than 20 per cent of the respondents were edentulous, including 10 per cent of those 18 to 34 years old. The median DMFT was 24 for all respondents and 21 for dentulous respondents. There was a significant difference between Inuit and non-Inuit respondents, which was most marked in the 18 to 34 year old age group (mean DMFT 22.1 versus 15.6, p
PubMed ID
8453514 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Age and sex specific incidence of primary total hip alloplasty in the county of Southern Jutland]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73295
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 6;155(36):2777-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-6-1993
Author
L N Hansen
S. Overgaard
H M Knudsen
N. Mossing
Author Affiliation
Sønderborg Sygehus, ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1993 Sep 6;155(36):2777-9
Date
Sep-6-1993
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hip Prosthesis - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Abstract
During the 10-year period 1981-90, 1752 primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were performed in the county of south Jutland, Denmark. The annual number of THA increased until a steady state level was reached during 1988-90. The age and sex specific incidences were calculated for this period using the population distribution of the County. The age specific incidences were highest in the age-group 70-79 years for both female and males, namely respectively 485 and 410 THAs per 100,000 inhabitants. The overall incidence was 82 THA per 100,000 inhabitants. During the next 30 years, the demand for primary THA in Denmark is expected to increase 32 percent (from 4013 to 5307 THAs) as a consequence of demographic changes.
PubMed ID
8236543 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol anamnesis and a death place factor: Role in mortality rates due to leading cardiovascular diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270169
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(9):26-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
E A Mordovsky
A G Soloviev
A L Sannikov
Source
Ter Arkh. 2015;87(9):26-33
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - mortality
Cause of Death
Death Certificates
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To reveal the specific features of marital status and educational level in people who have died of leading circulatory diseases (CDs) in Arkhangelsk in relation to the place of death, alcohol anamnesis, and demographic characteristics (gender, life span). Materials and methods. Data on the diagnosed underlying cause of death, marital status, educational level, and place of death were copied from 4137 medical death certificates (form 106/y-08) of all those who had died in Arkhangelsk in 1 July to 30 June 2012. Data on patients registered at a psychoneurology dispensary as having a diagnosis of alcohol-induced mental and behavioral disorders (F10) were copied. The data were statistically processed using the procedures of binary and multinomial logistic regression analysis.
A total of 2101 people (50.8% of the total number of deaths) died of CDs (ICD-10 Class IX) in the study period. Male sex and a compromised alcohol anamnesis were associated with untimely death (less than 60 years of age) from acute conditions in ICD-10 Class IX. Male sex, a compromised alcohol anamnesis, and negative characteristics of marital and educational statuses were related to untimely death from chronic conditions in ICD-10 Class IX. Single people having a lower educational level and a compromised alcohol anamnesis statistically more frequently died of CDs outside a health care facility.
The results of the investigation suggest that there is inequality in the excess risk of death from leading CDs among the representatives of different social population groups in Arkhangelsk, as well as nonequivalence in their interaction with the public health system.
PubMed ID
26591549 View in PubMed
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418 records – page 1 of 42.