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The primary healthcare nurse practitioner in Ontario: a workforce study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150344
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(2):58-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Mary van Soeren
Christina Hurlock-Chorostecki
Sharon Goodwin
Elizabeth Baker
Author Affiliation
Canadian Health Care Innovations, Adjunct Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada. mary.vansoeren@sympatico.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2009;22(2):58-72
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Curriculum - trends
Data Collection
Female
Forecasting
Health Services Accessibility - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Health Services Research
Humans
Infant
Leadership
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Nurse Practitioners - education - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Nurse's Role
Ontario
Primary Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The role of the primary healthcare nurse practitioner (NP-PHC) has a long history in Ontario. In this paper, we describe the evolution of the role with a focus on geographic distribution, a profile of client populations and the services provided by NP-PHCs. Comparisons will be made to findings from previous studies and reports on the NP-PHC role in Ontario. In 2004 and 2005, two-thirds of the nurse practitioners registered with the College of Nurses of Ontario responded to a descriptive self-reporting survey. The data collected revealed that NP-PHCs work throughout the healthcare system, including with underserviced and marginalized populations, in community health centres and in outpatient areas within acute care hospitals. They provide the entire spectrum of primary healthcare services. Barriers to fully enacting the role are related to restrictive legislation that limits NP prescribing and diagnosing, and the ability to work to full scope of practice in hospitals (for example, in emergency departments). Targeted funding has promoted the role throughout the province. However, inadequate and insecure pilot funding continues to be a concern. Findings from this study indicate that policy decisions to support the NP role in rural and remote areas have resulted in expansion of the role across the province. Yet, NPs perceive that legislation has lagged and inhibits their ability to meet patient and health systems needs.
PubMed ID
19521161 View in PubMed
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[The need of special services in the future care of the mentally retarded].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229041
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 May 20;110(13):1721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1990
Author
T. Jenssen
W T Mørch
Author Affiliation
Oslo Vernepleierhøgskole.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 May 20;110(13):1721-7
Date
May-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Services Needs and Demand - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Health services research - trends
Humans
Intellectual Disability - nursing - rehabilitation
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
A proposal for deinstitutionalization of the mentally retarded in Norway passed the Norwegian Storting in May 1988. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has prepared guidelines for planning and implenting this reform. On 1 January 1991 the responsibility for providing the necessary services was transferred to the municipalities. Many problems have to be solved in order to ensure that the life of each mentally retarded person is qualitatively improved after normalization and integration into society. In July 1989 the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs issued a document which assumed that necessary specialists and special services for the mentally retarded already exist, and are being used. Our study has questioned this assumption as being incorrect or incomplete. We interviewed persons in charge of the system of health care in all 19 Norwegian counties. Our conclusions are as follows: The mentally retarded do receive specialist services in various areas of somatic medicine. Their needs as regards psychiatric care are not taken care of by psychiatric specialists in hospitals or at out-patient facilities. Data shows that the system of institutionalized health care for the mentally retarded provides unique services which are best described as systematically applied behaviour analyses. Such special competence is often lacking in the Norwegian health services otherwise. In order to ensure that the mentally retarded will receive the best possible care, this competence must be integrated into the future system of care. It is most importance to consider these problems without delay. This article also discusses organizing special training and treatment for the mentally retarded themselves and special training for the persons providing the care.
PubMed ID
2368058 View in PubMed
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