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[A cognitive approach to overutilization of health services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192488
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4745-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001

Acute care alternate-level-of-care days due to delayed discharge for traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114257
Source
Healthc Policy. 2012 May;7(4):41-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Chen Amy
Brandon Zagorski
Vincy Chan
Daria Parsons
Rika Vander Laan
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, UHN, Toronto, ON.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2012 May;7(4):41-55
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain diseases
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental disorders
Ontario
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Alternate-level-of-care (ALC) days represent hospital beds that are taken up by patients who would more appropriately be cared for in other settings. ALC days have been found to be costly and may result in worse functional outcomes, reduced motor skills and longer lengths of stay in rehabilitation. This study examines the factors that are associated with acute care ALC days among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). We used the Discharge Abstract Database to identify patients with ABI using International Classification of Disease-10 codes. From fiscal years 2007/08 to 2009/10, 17.5% of patients with traumatic and 14% of patients with non-traumatic brain injury had at least one ALC day. Significant predictors include having a psychiatric co-morbidity, increasing age and length of stay in acute care. These findings can inform planning for care of people with ABI in a publicly funded healthcare system.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23634162 View in PubMed
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Adherence to health regimens among frequent attenders of Finnish healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280267
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sari Hirsikangas
Outi Kanste
Juha Korpelainen
Helvi Kyngäs
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe adherence to health regimens and the factors associated with it among adult frequent attenders (FAs).
This was a cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 462 healthcare FAs in 7 municipal health centres in northern Finland. An FA is a person who has had 8 or more outpatient visits to a GP (in a health centre) or 4 or more outpatient visits to a university hospital during 1 year. The main outcome was self-reported adherence to health regimens.
Of the FAs, 82% adhered well to their health regimens. Carrying out self-care, medical care and feeling responsible for self-care were the most significant predictors to good adherence in all models. No significant differences in adherence were found in male and female subjects, age groups or educational levels. Support from healthcare providers and support from relatives were not significant predictors of good adherence.
FAs in Finland adhere well to health regimens and exceptionally well to medication. Variables that predict the best adherence of FAs to health regimens are carrying out self-care, receiving medical care and feeling responsible for self-care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26996780 View in PubMed
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Admission patterns of persistent somatization patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73318
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Jul;15(4):211-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
P. Fink
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychiatric Demography, Aarhus Psychiatric Hospital, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Jul;15(4):211-8
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Health Resources - utilization
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Specialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Persistent somatization patients put a serious burden on the health care system with multiple admissions, tests, surgeries, and medications. This study reports on factors relevant to the health-seeking behavior of somatizing patients and aspects of the health care system that facilitate their overutilization of health resources. Individuals (age 17-49 years) from the general population of two Danish municipalities with at least 10 general admissions during an 8-year period were studied comparing persistent somatizers with other high utilizers of medical admissions. Results are reported on geographical mobility, change in family doctors, route and distribution of admissions by time of day or week, discharges against medical advice, physical disease overlooked, and distribution of admissions to specialties. Although the health-seeking behavior of persistent somatizers may in part explain their overutilization of health care resources, such overutilization could be reduced and much suffering avoided if physicians displayed the same enthusiasm in diagnosing somatization as in ruling out organic pathology.
Notes
Comment In: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 1993 Jul;15(4):208-108344509
PubMed ID
8344510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advice seeking and appropriate use of a pediatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220581
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
T F Oberlander
I B Pless
G E Dougherty
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Algorithms
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine whether seeking advice prior to an unscheduled visit to a pediatric emergency department (PED) influences appropriate use of this setting for minor illnesses.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The medical emergency department of the Montreal (Quebec) Children's Hospital, a major referral and urban teaching hospital.
Four hundred eighty-nine of 562 consecutive parents visiting the PED over two periods, one in February and the other in July 1989.
None.
Parents of children between 0 and 18 years of age visiting the PED were asked whether they had previously sought advice from family, friends, or a physician. Other factors possibly related to the decision to seek care were also measured. Appropriateness was rated, blind to discharge diagnosis, by two pediatricians using a structured series of questions incorporating the child's age, time of the visit, clinical state, and problem at presentation. Thirty-four percent of visits among respondents were judged appropriate. In bivariate analysis, appropriate visits occurred significantly more often when a parent spoke to both a physician and a nonphysician (47%) prior to visiting the PED than when no advice was sought (29%; P
PubMed ID
8352220 View in PubMed
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Ageing with telecare: care or coercion in austerity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256617
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Maggie Mort
Celia Roberts
Blanca Callén
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Lancaster University, UK Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Barcelona, Spain.
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Jul;35(6):799-812
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Aged
Aging - psychology
Coercion
Consumer Participation
Economic Recession
Geriatric Nursing - methods - standards
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Organizational Innovation
Professional-Patient Relations - ethics
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care
Spain
Telemedicine - instrumentation - standards - utilization
Abstract
In recent years images of independence, active ageing and staying at home have come to characterise a successful old age in western societies. 'Telecare' technologies are heavily promoted to assist ageing-in-place and a nexus of demographic ageing, shrinking healthcare and social care budgets and technological ambition has come to promote the 'telehome' as the solution to the problem of the 'age dependency ratio'. Through the adoption of a range of monitoring and telecare devices, it seems that the normative vision of independence will also be achieved. But with falling incomes and pressure for economies of scale, what kind of independence is experienced in the telehome? In this article we engage with the concepts of 'technogenarians' and 'shared work' to illuminate our analysis of telecare in use. Drawing on European-funded research we argue that home-monitoring based telecare has the potential to coerce older people unless we are able to recognise and respect a range of responses including non-use and 'misuse' in daily practice. We propose that re-imagining the aims of telecare and redesigning systems to allow for creative engagement with technologies and the co-production of care relations would help to avoid the application of coercive forms of care technology in times of austerity.
PubMed ID
23094945 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native Men's Use of Sexual Health Services, 2006-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291987
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Megan A Cahn
S Marie Harvey
Matthew A Town
Author Affiliation
Postdoctoral research fellow, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Men's Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Reproductive Health Services - utilization
Sex Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native men experience poorer sexual health than white men. Barriers related to their sex and racial identity may prevent them from seeking care; however, little is known about this population's use of sexual health services.
Sexual health service usage was examined among 923 American Indian and Alaska Native men and 5,322 white men aged 15-44 who participated in the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth. Logistic regression models explored differences in service use by race and examined correlates of use among American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Among men aged 15-19 and those aged 35-44, men with incomes greater than 133% of the federal poverty level, men with private insurance, those living in the Northeast and those living in rural areas, American Indians and Alaska Natives were more likely than whites to use STD or HIV services (odds ratios, 1.5-3.2). The odds of birth control service use did not differ by race. Differences in service use were found among American Indian and Alaska Native men: For example, those with a usual source of care had elevated odds of using sexual health services (1.9-3.4), while those reporting no recent testicular exam had reduced odds of using these services (0.3-0.4).
This study provides baseline data on American Indian and Alaska Native men's use of sexual health services. Research exploring these men's views on these services is needed to help develop programs that better serve them.
PubMed ID
28758709 View in PubMed
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Answering the hard questions about thrombosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205262
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 16;158(12):1600-1; author reply 1602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-16-1998
Author
M. Schull
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Jun 16;158(12):1600-1; author reply 1602
Date
Jun-16-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Quebec
Thrombolytic Therapy - utilization
Time Factors
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1998 Oct 6;159(7):757-89805012
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 24;158(4):475-809627559
PubMed ID
9645171 View in PubMed
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[Antenatal care in Norway--many unnecessary check ups]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63569
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 30;122(20):1989-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2002
Author
Bjørn Backe
Author Affiliation
Fødeavdelingen St. Olavs Hospital 7006 Trondheim. bjorn.backe@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 30;122(20):1989-92
Date
Aug-30-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Maternal Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Maternal Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Midwifery - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Practice Guidelines
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Until recently antenatal care in Norway has been provided solely by general practitioners. In 1995, it was laid down in law that the communities should offer antenatal care provided by midwives in community health centers. The resulting conflict between midwives and disagreeing general practitioners may have led to an increase in the number of antenatal visits. Also, the utilization of midwife-based antenatal care is unknown. MATERIAL AND METHODS: National cross-sectional study including all 54 hospital departments of obstetrics. For all patients number of antenatal visits and parity were recorded. The study included 1,780 women giving birth during the two-week registration period. RESULTS: The mean number of antenatal care visits was 12.0 (range 0-44). The difference between primiparous (mean 12.4) and parous women (mean 11.7) was minor. Midwives provided 44% and doctors 56% of the antenatal visits. A total of 279 women (16%) had not seen a midwife during pregnancy; 3% had only seen a midwife and no doctor. INTERPRETATION: The recommended reduction in the frequency of antenatal visits is not followed up. The proportion of visits performed by midwives is approaching the 50% level suggested in the guidelines for antenatal care.
PubMed ID
12555444 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic prescription in italian children: a population-based study in Friuli Venezia Giulia, north-east Italy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31775
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2001 Nov;90(11):1316-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
G. Borgnolo
G. Simon
C. Francescutti
L. Lattuada
L. Zanier
Author Affiliation
Agenzia Regionale della Sanità del Friuli Venezia Giulia, Udine, Italy. gborgno@tin.it
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2001 Nov;90(11):1316-20
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization Review
Family Practice - standards
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Italy
Pediatrics - standards
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Comprehensive information on prescription patterns of antibiotics in Italy is scarce. This study describes the use of systemic antibiotics in children according to age and sex in Friuli Venezia Giulia, north-east Italy. A pharmacological prescription database was used to identify individual prescriptions provided to all 0-15-y-old resident children (n = 140,630) during 1998. Overall, 124,383 prescriptions were identified. The prescription rate was highest in the 3-6 y olds, with 1491 antibiotic prescriptions per 1,000 children per year. Antibiotics were prescribed for 52% of infants, 57.2% of toddlers and 62% of preschool children. Twenty-nine percent of the prescriptions were for cephalosporins, 27% for macrolides and 24% for broad-spectrum penicillins. Prescription rates were much higher than in other countries such as Denmark, with more antibiotic courses prescribed for more children at all ages. Prescriptions from general practitioners and family paediatricians often included second-line antibiotics (e.g. cephalosporins and macrolides) or antibiotics that have not been approved for community-acquired paediatric infections (e.g. quinolones). CONCLUSION: The development of regional guidelines for antibiotic use in children should be urgently recommended.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2001 Nov;90(11):1223-511808889
PubMed ID
11808906 View in PubMed
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226 records – page 1 of 23.