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9 records – page 1 of 1.

Canadian politicians propose expansion of private health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200066
Source
BMJ. 1999 Dec 11;319(7224):1520
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-1999
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
BMJ. 1999 Dec 11;319(7224):1520
Date
Dec-11-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services - economics
Health Services Administration - economics
Humans
Private Sector
PubMed ID
10591703 View in PubMed
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Grant award to the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), HHS. Availability of grant funds for the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3714
Source
Fed Regist. 1999 Apr 16;64(73):18922-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-16-1999
Source
Fed Regist. 1999 Apr 16;64(73):18922-3
Date
Apr-16-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Community Mental Health Services - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Program Development - economics
United States
United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
This notice is to inform the public that CSAT and CMHS are making available approximately $5,000,000 for an award in FY 1999 to the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities, Department of Health and Social Services, State of Alaska to support development, implementation, and evaluation of a comprehensive, seamless system of care for persons with co-occurring substance abuse (including alcohol and other drugs) and mental health disorders in Anchorage, Alaska, and its environs. CSAT and CMHS will make this award if the application is recommended for approval by the Initial Review Group and the CSAT and CMHS National Advisory Councils. This is not a formal request for applications; assistance will be provided only to the Alaska Division of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities. Eligibility for this program is limited to the State of Alaska, as specified in Congressional report language, in recognition of primacy of its responsibility for, and interest in, providing for the needs of its citizens, and because the success of the program will depend upon the authority and ability to broadly coordinate the variety of resources essential for full program success. The State has committed itself to moving certain mental health services from their extant institutional bases to community bases, and, simultaneously, changing from parallel systems of service delivery--for substance abuse and mental health problems--to an approach designed to deliver services seamlessly to persons with comorbidity. Alaska needs a high level of systemic competence in delivering these services due, in great part, to its climate (resulting in deaths of homeless comorbid persons), and to the requirements of its proposed systems changes. The proposed project presents a unique opportunity for SAMHSA and its Centers to learn, first hand, how the transition from parallel systems to a seamless system of care can be accomplished in a small city in a rural/frontier State, and at what costs. The project promises to yield learnings on the factors and circumstances that facilitate and/or retard systemic change in complex treatment systems. This "Anchorage Comorbidity Services" project is also part of SAMHSA's commitment to improving services, and relates directly to the resolution unanimously adopted by its National Advisory Council earlier this year. Funding from CSAT and CMHS will support some services to persons with co-occurring disorders; continuing planning, review, management, and infrastructure development for the effort; and a tripartite evaluation of the project, including process, outcome, and impact evaluations. This is a unique opportunity to evaluate significant change in a State system of care for persons with co-occurring disorders.
PubMed ID
10558551 View in PubMed
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Health care cost containment in Denmark and Norway: a question of relative professional status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259401
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2014 Apr;9(2):169-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Lotte B Andersen
Source
Health Econ Policy Law. 2014 Apr;9(2):169-91
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost Control
Denmark
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Personnel - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Services Administration - economics
Humans
Norway
Professional Role
Referral and Consultation
State Medicine - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
The demand for publicly subsidized health care services is insatiable, but the costs can be contained in different ways: formal rules can limit access to and the number of subsidized services, demand and supply can be regulated through the price mechanism, the relevant profession can contain the costs through state-sanctioned self-regulation, and other professions can contain the costs (e.g. through referrals). The use of these cost containment measures varies between countries, depending on demand and supply factors, but the relative professional status of the health professions may help explain why different countries use cost containment measures differently for different services. This article compares cost containment measures in Denmark and Norway because these countries vary with regard to the professional status of the medical profession relative to other health care providers, while other relevant variables are approximately similar. The investigation is based on formal agreements and rules, historical documents, existing analyses and an analysis of 360 newspaper articles. It shows that high relative professional status seems to help professions to avoid user fees, steer clear of regulation from other professions and regulate the services produced by others. This implies that relative professional status should be taken into consideration in analyses of health care cost containment.
PubMed ID
23806222 View in PubMed
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[How to make money? You are a county council's chief physician].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183273
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Sep 25;100(39):3060-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-2003
Author
Ake Andrén-Sandberg
Author Affiliation
Nordiska hälsovårdshögskolan, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Sep 25;100(39):3060-3
Date
Sep-25-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Administration - economics - ethics
Humans
Leadership
Resource Allocation - economics - ethics
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement - economics - ethics
PubMed ID
14560672 View in PubMed
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[Is there a Norwegian medical identity?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173890
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1813-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-2005
Author
Magne Nylenna
Øivind Larsen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Medisinsk teknisk forskningssenter, 7489 Trondheim og Sosial- og helsedirektoratet, Postboks 7000 St. Olavs plass 0130 Oslo. magne.nylenna@shdir.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Jun 30;125(13):1813-6
Date
Jun-30-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Cultural Characteristics
Family Practice - economics - organization & administration
Gatekeeping
Health Policy - economics
Health Services - economics
Health Services Administration - economics
Humans
Internationality
Norway
Physician's Role
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Norwegian medicine is interwoven with the country's history, social structure, and its organization of health services. Health services in Norway are based on an ideology of equality and solidarity in which decentralization and strong primary care are crucial elements. The aim is treatment at the lowest effective level of care, irrespective of patients' financial or social status. Health services have high political priority and people expect a great deal of them. The medical profession in Norway has a double loyalty: to the individual patient and to society at large. The gate keeper-role, which has been most prominent among general practitioners, reflects economic responsibility as well as some hesitation in the use of extensive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Norwegian medicine has never been particularly eager on interventions. This could be explained both by strong governmental control and a traditional Norwegian moderation. The medical profession is less homogenous than before, but still has a strong community of communication. The concept of health among Norwegians is pragmatic and holistic. The relationship between health and nature is strong and in line with people's conception of nature in general. Social developments such as individualization, internationalization and economic ways of thinking together with increasing specialization and market adjustment in the health services make for rapid changes in Norwegian medicine. It is more and more difficult to define national features, but those existing are well worth defending.
PubMed ID
16012548 View in PubMed
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[Sweden has much to learn from English health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174802
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 11-17;102(15):1163-4, 1167
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kjell Tullus
Author Affiliation
Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London. tulluk@gosh.nhs.uk
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Apr 11-17;102(15):1163-4, 1167
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England
Family Practice - economics - organization & administration - standards
Health Services - economics - standards
Health Services Administration - economics
Hospital Administration - economics
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
15892353 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Syst Transit. 2012;14(5):1-159
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anders Anell
Anna H Glenngård
Sherry Merkur
Author Affiliation
Lund University School of Economics and Management.
Source
Health Syst Transit. 2012;14(5):1-159
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Financing, Organized
Government Regulation
Health Planning - economics - trends
Health Policy
Health Services Administration - economics - trends
Health status
Humans
Public Health - economics - trends
Sweden
Abstract
Life expectancy in Sweden is high and the country performs well in comparisons related to disease-oriented indicators of health service outcomes and quality of care. The Swedish health system is committed to ensuring the health of all citizens and abides by the principles of human dignity, need and solidarity, and cost-effectiveness. The state is responsible for overall health policy, while the funding and provision of services lies largely with the county councils and regions. The municipalities are responsible for the care of older and disabled people. The majority of primary care centres and almost all hospitals are owned by the county councils. Health care expenditure is mainly tax funded (80%) and is equivalent to 9.9% of gross domestic product (GDP) (2009). Only about 4% of the population has voluntary health insurance (VHI). User charges fund about 17% of health expenditure and are levied on visits to professionals, hospitalization and medicines. The number of acute care hospital beds is below the European Union (EU) average and Sweden allocates more human resources to the health sector than most OECD countries. In the past, the Achilles heel of Swedish health care included long waiting times for diagnosis and treatment and, more recently, divergence in quality of care between regions and socioeconomic groups. Addressing long waiting times remains a key policy objective along with improving access to providers. Recent principal health reforms over the past decade relate to: concentrating hospital services; regionalizing health care services, including mergers; improving coordinated care; increasing choice, competition and privatization in primary care; privatization and competition in the pharmacy sector; changing co-payments; and increasing attention to public comparison of quality and efficiency indicators, the value of investments in health care and responsiveness to patients needs. Reforms are often introduced on the local level, thus the pattern of reform varies across local government, although mimicking behaviour usually occurs.
PubMed ID
22894859 View in PubMed
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[The importance of new remuneration forms in the process of reforming a district health care system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182143
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):23-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A V Paskal'
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Nov-Dec;(6):23-5
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Personnel - economics
Health Services Administration - economics
Humans
Preventive Health Services - manpower - supply & distribution
Russia
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
An experience of reforming the healthcare system in the Saratov Region is outlined in the paper. The reforms are based primarily on the following: a system of stimulating payments; a contract-based structure of labor management and of remuneration; quality monitoring of medical services; and resource-sparing technologies.
PubMed ID
14708191 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The population's insurance protection as a mechanism responsible for provision of sanitary and epidemiological well-being].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162248
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Iarushin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2007 May-Jun;(3):34-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Employment - legislation & jurisprudence
Environmental Illness - economics - prevention & control
Health Promotion - economics
Health Services Administration - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Industry - legislation & jurisprudence
Insurance Coverage - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational Health
Russia
Social Responsibility
Abstract
The paper describes a principal scheme of insurance protection organization due to the negative human influences of environmental factors and industrial risks as one of the most effective mechanisms responsible for controlling sanitary-and-epidemiological well-being and human health. It also considers how a voluntary medical collective insurance program and a civil responsibility insurance one are being implemented due to unforeseen damages done to the population's health and how the quality and safety of goods (work, services) are controlled. Organizational, methodic, and normative legal approaches are proposed to developing the population's insurance protection system.
PubMed ID
17658042 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.