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29 records – page 1 of 3.

[Should lesbian women have access to artificial fertilization?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71409
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Feb 10;165(7):701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2003
Author
Thomas Sobirk Petersen
Kirsten Hansen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Feb 10;165(7):701
Date
Feb-10-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Services Accessibility - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Mar 31;165(14):1467; author reply 146712715681
PubMed ID
12617053 View in PubMed
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Remote monitoring or close encounters? Ethical considerations in priority setting regarding telecare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274313
Source
Health Care Anal. 2014 Dec;22(4):325-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anders Nordgren
Source
Health Care Anal. 2014 Dec;22(4):325-39
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Priorities - ethics
Health Services Accessibility - ethics
Humans
Resource Allocation
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics - ethics
Abstract
The proportion of elderly in society is growing rapidly, leading to increasing health care costs. New remote monitoring technologies are expected to lower these costs by reducing the number of close encounters with health care professionals, for example the number of visits to health care centres. In this paper, I discuss issues of priority setting raised by this expectation. As a starting-point, I analyse the recent debate on principles for priority setting in Sweden. The Swedish debate illustrates that developing an approach to priority setting is an ongoing process. On the basis of this analysis, I conclude that several different ethical principles, and specifications of these principles, can be appealed to for giving priority--over close encounters--to a large-scale introduction of remote monitoring technologies in health care services to elderly people, but also that many specifications can be appealed to against giving such priority. I propose that given the different views on principles, it is necessary to develop fair procedures of deliberation on these principles and their application, in particular in order to reach agreement on exactly how much resources should be allocated to remote monitoring and how much to close encounters. I also present a few points to consider in a large-scale introduction of remote monitoring.
PubMed ID
22802012 View in PubMed
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[Discrimination in access to health care of undocumented migrants results in suffering and death. The new law proposal a threat against the patients, the health care and the society]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87314
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Feb 20-26;105(8):538-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ascher Henry
Björkman Anders
Kjellström Lars
Lindberg Tor
Author Affiliation
Rosengrenska kliniken, sjukvärdsnätverk för papperslösa flyktingar i Göteborg. henry.ascher@pediat.gu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Feb 20-26;105(8):538-41
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Fatal Outcome
Female
Health Services Accessibility - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Prejudice
Refugees
Sweden
Transients and Migrants
PubMed ID
18363295 View in PubMed
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Should health care providers be given earlier access to prophylaxis during a pandemic?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163391
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2007;20(1):35-6, 41-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

Asking the inconceivable? Ethical and legal considerations regarding HIV-seropositive couples' request to access assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs): a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159568
Source
Health Law J. 2008;16:237-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Challenges for health regions--meeting both rural and urban ethics needs: a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176459
Source
HEC Forum. 2004 Dec;16(4):219-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Christy Simpson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bioethics, Dalhousie University.
Source
HEC Forum. 2004 Dec;16(4):219-21
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Ethics, Institutional
Health Services Accessibility - ethics
Health Services Needs and Demand - ethics - standards
Humans
Rural Health
Rural Health Services - ethics - standards
Rural Population
PubMed ID
15672696 View in PubMed
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The unethical focus on access: a study of medical ethics and the waiting-time guarantee.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152893
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
H I Karlberg
B-M Brinkmo
Author Affiliation
Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden. ingvar.karlberg@gu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):117-21
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Focus Groups
Health Facility Administrators
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility - ethics
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Questionnaires
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
All civilized societies favour ethical principles of equity. In healthcare, these principles generally focus on needs for medical care. Methods for establishing priorities among such needs are instrumental in this process. In this study, we analysed whether rules on access to healthcare, waiting-time guarantees, conflict with ethical principles of distributive justice.
We interviewed directors, managers and other decision-makers of various healthcare providers of hospitals, primary care organizations and purchasing offices. We also conducted focus group interviews with professionals from a number of distinct medical areas.
Our informants and their co-workers were reasonably familiar with the ethical platforms for priority-setting established by the Swedish parliament, giving the sickest patients complete priority. However, to satisfy the waiting-time guarantees, the informants often had to make priority decisions contrary to the ethical principles by favouring access before needs to keep waiting times within certain limits. The common opinion was that the waiting-time guarantee leads to crowding-out effects, overruling the ethical principles based on needs.
For more than a decade, the interpretation in Sweden of the equitable principle based on medical needs has been distorted through political decisions, leading to healthcare providers giving priority to access rather than needs for care.
PubMed ID
19179448 View in PubMed
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[Undocumented immigrants without access to Swedish health care. Time for Sweden to recognize equality of human beings]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79569
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Nov 8-14;103(45):3452-5
Publication Type
Article

Gaining insite: harm reduction in nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151039
Source
Can Nurse. 2009 Apr;105(4):16-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Beverly Lightfoot
Ciro Panessa
Sargent Hayden
Meaghan Thumath
Irene Goldstone
Bernadette Pauly
Author Affiliation
Insite, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Can Nurse. 2009 Apr;105(4):16-22
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Crime
Ethics, Nursing
Harm Reduction
Health facilities
Health Facility Administration
Health promotion
Health Services Accessibility - ethics
Humans
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications - nursing
Abstract
Insite, a supervised injection facility in Vancouver, British Columbia, is an evidence-based response to the ongoing health and social crisis in the city's Downtown Eastside. It has been shown that Insite's services increase treatment referrals, mitigate the spread and impact of blood-borne diseases and prevent overdose deaths. One of the goals of this facility is to improve the health of those who use injection drugs. Nurses contribute to this goal by building trusting relationships with clients and delivering health services in a harm reduction setting. The authors describe nursing practice at Insite and its alignment with professional and ethical standards of registered nursing practice. Harm reduction is consistent with accepted standards for nursing practice as set out by the College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia and the Canadian Nurses Association and with World Health Organization guidelines.
PubMed ID
19435252 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.