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45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5-7 October 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283198
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2017 Feb;39(1):208-341
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2017

The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion services in Canada: a patchwork quilt with many holes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195196
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):847-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001

Accessibility of dental services according to family income in a non-insured population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73260
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1993 Dec;37(12):1501-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
J. Grytten
D. Holst
P. Laake
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Blindern, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1993 Dec;37(12):1501-8
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Humans
Income
Male
Medically Uninsured
Norway
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of family income on accessibility to dental services among adults in Norway. The analysis was performed on a set of national data collected in 1989, which was representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population aged 20 years and above. The sample size was 1200 individuals. The data were analyzed according to a two-part model. The first part determined the probability of whether the consumer had demanded the services or not during the last year according to family income. The second part estimated how the amount of services utilized depended on family income, for those with demand. The elasticity of the odds of having demanded the services with respect to family income was 0.48. Family income had no effect on the amount of services utilized. Additional analyses also showed that there was no effect of family income on the probability of having received a filling or a crown when visiting the dentist. In Norway, almost all costs for dental services are paid by the consumer. It is not possible from the data alone to say whether subsidized dental care is an effective way of reducing the inequalities in demand.
PubMed ID
8303334 View in PubMed
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Access to care, health status, and health disparities in the United States and Canada: results of a cross-national population-based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169088
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Karen E Lasser
David U Himmelstein
Steffie Woolhandler
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, The Cambridge Health Alliance and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Mass, USA. klasser@challiance.org
Source
Am J Public Health. 2006 Jul;96(7):1300-7
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care - economics - standards - utilization
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Income
Life expectancy
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
National Health Programs - economics - standards - utilization
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Quality of Health Care
Socioeconomic Factors
United States - epidemiology
Universal Coverage
Abstract
We compared health status, access to care, and utilization of medical services in the United States and Canada and compared disparities according to race, income, and immigrant status.
We analyzed population-based data on 3505 Canadian and 5183 US adults from the Joint Canada/US Survey of Health. Controlling for gender, age, income, race, and immigrant status, we used logistic regression to analyze country as a predictor of access to care, quality of care, and satisfaction with care and as a predictor of disparities in these measures.
In multivariate analyses, US respondents (compared with Canadians) were less likely to have a regular doctor, more likely to have unmet health needs, and more likely to forgo needed medicines. Disparities on the basis of race, income, and immigrant status were present in both countries but were more extreme in the United States.
United States residents are less able to access care than are Canadians. Universal coverage appears to reduce most disparities in access to care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16735628 View in PubMed
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Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134419
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bruce B Wallace
Michael I Macentee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. bbw@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Dental Care - economics
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Poverty
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Work
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people.
PubMed ID
21590434 View in PubMed
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Access to new cardiovascular therapies in Canadian hospitals: a national survey of the formulary process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186545
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Stephen J Shalansky
Roohina Virk
Margaret Ackman
Cynthia Jackevicius
Heather Kertland
Ross Tsuyuki
Karin Humphries
Author Affiliation
Pharmacy Department, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. shalansk@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2003 Feb;19(2):173-9
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal - economics - therapeutic use
Canada
Cardiovascular Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Dalteparin - economics - therapeutic use
Data Collection
Drug Utilization
Enoxaparin - economics - therapeutic use
Formularies, Hospital - standards
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hematologic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments - economics - therapeutic use
Peptides - economics - therapeutic use
Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee - economics - organization & administration - standards
Ticlopidine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Abstract
Access to new therapies in hospitals depends upon both clinical trial evidence and local Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) committee approval. The process of formulary evaluation by P&T committees is not well-understood.
To describe the formulary decision-making process in Canadian hospitals for cardiovascular medications recently made available on the Canadian market.
Postal survey of hospital pharmacy directors in all Canadian hospitals with more than 50 beds. Target drugs included abciximab, enoxaparin, dalteparin, clopidogrel, eptifibatide and tirofiban.
Of 428 surveys mailed, responses were received from 164 P&T committees representing 350 hospitals for an effective response rate of 82%. While physicians make up the largest proportion of committee membership, pharmacists play an influential role. Information most commonly cited as influencing formulary decisions included published clinical trials (97%), regional guidelines (90%), pharmacoeconomic data (84%), decisions at peer hospitals (73%) and local opinion leaders (60%). However, this information was often not required on formulary applications. Approval timelines varied widely for target medications but there were no regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics that were independent predictors of early formulary application or approval.
There is wide variability in the time taken for Canadian institutions to adopt new cardiovascular therapies, which is not explained by regional, hospital or P&T committee characteristics. Standardization of the formulary application and evaluation processes, including sharing of information amongst institutions, would lead to broader understanding of the applicable issues, more objectivity and improved efficiency.
PubMed ID
12601443 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;56(7):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Rajamannar Ramasubbu
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;56(7):1-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility - economics - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - economics
Mental Health Services - economics - trends - utilization
PubMed ID
21835100 View in PubMed
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Access to organs for transplantation: overcoming "rejection".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239279
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-1985
Author
M A Somerville
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1985 Jan 15;132(2):113-7
Date
Jan-15-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadaver
Canada
Commerce
Contract Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Ethics, Medical
Graft Rejection
Health Services Accessibility - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Tissue Donors - psychology
Abstract
Recent success in overcoming rejection of transplanted organs has led to a much greater demand for organs from donors and to a reconsideration of mechanisms for increasing the availability of organs from cadavers. In the latter respect the two basic systems are "contracting-in" and "contracting-out". Each system has different benefits and harms, and it is a value judgement that should be adopted. However, both systems raise legal, ethical and practical issues that must be addressed if organs for transplantation are to become available to all who need them.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1984 Feb 18;1(8373):407-811644279
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Apr;13(2):20-26853148
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1983 Dec;13(6):23-326360951
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1983 May;143(5):975-86679240
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1984 Mar 29;310(13):864-86366555
Cites: Hastings Cent Rep. 1984 Feb;14(1):22-36715148
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Mar 23-30;251(12):15926700059
PubMed ID
3880649 View in PubMed
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223 records – page 1 of 23.