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2999 records – page 1 of 300.

Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
William H Ryding
Author Affiliation
Hastings and Prince Edward Counties Health Unit, Belleville, Ontario, Canada. bryding@hpechu.on.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2006 Feb;72(1):47-8
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Dental Care - economics - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
National Health Programs
Poverty
PubMed ID
16480604 View in PubMed
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The 2-year costs and effects of a public health nursing case management intervention on mood-disordered single parents on social assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191135
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maureen Markle-Reid
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Amiram Gafni
Carolyn Byrne
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Room 3N46, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. mreid@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Case Management - economics
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Depressive Disorder - economics - nursing - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario
Public Assistance
Public Health Nursing - economics
Single Parent - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the 2-year costs and effects of a proactive, public health nursing case management approach compared with a self-directed approach for 129 single parents (98% were mothers) on social assistance in a Canadian setting. A total of 43% of these parents had a major depressive disorder and 38% had two or three other health conditions at baseline.
Study participants were recruited over a 12 month period and randomized into two groups: one receiving proactive public health nursing and one which did not.
At 2 years, 69 single parents with 123 children receiving proactive public health nursing (compared with 60 parents with 91 children who did not receive public health nursing services) showed a slightly greater reduction in dysthymia and slightly higher social adjustment. There was no difference between the public health and control groups in total per parent annual cost of health and support services. However, costs were averted due to a 12% difference in non-use of social assistance in the previous 12 months for parents in the public health nursing group. This translates into an annual cost saving of 240,000 dollars (Canadian) of costs averted within 1 year for every 100 parents.
In the context of a system of national health and social insurance, this study supports the fact that it is no more costly to proactively service this population of parents on social assistance.
PubMed ID
11882101 View in PubMed
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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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45th ESCP-NSF international symposium on clinical pharmacy: clinical pharmacy tackling inequalities and access to health care. Oslo, Norway, 5-7 October 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283198
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2017 Feb;39(1):208-341
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2017

[337 home calls during daytime from the emergency medical center in Oslo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30514
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Erling Iveland
Jørund Straand
Author Affiliation
Oslo kommunale legevakt, Storgata 40, 0182 Oslo. ovrefoss.14@c2i.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):354-7
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
House Calls - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians, Family
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few studies have addressed physicians' home calls in Norway. The aim of this study is to analyse home calls during daytime in Oslo in relation to patients (age, sex, district), diagnoses, request procedures, and clinical outcome. METHODS AND MATERIAL: General practitioners in the City of Oslo emergency medical centre recorded their home calls during three months using a standardised form. RESULTS: Calls to 337 patients (mean age 70, median 77 years; two thirds females; seven to children below two years of age) were recorded. The home calls were requested by relatives (36%), the patients themselves (32%), community care nurses (11%), and nursing homes (7%). The assessments made by the operators of the medical emergency telephone were generally correct. Physicians reported 77% full and 20% partial match between reported and found medical problem. The physicians assessed that 22% of the patients would have been able to go and see a doctor. 39% of all patients were admitted to hospital, 34 % needed ambulance transportation. The admitting GPs received hospital reports only after 27% of admissions. INTERPRETATION: Access to acute home calls by a physician during daytime is a necessary function in an urban public health service.
PubMed ID
14963510 View in PubMed
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1933-2003: lessons from 70 years of experience with mental health, capacity and consent legislation in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179705
Source
Health Law Can. 2004 Apr;24(3):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

The 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines will prevent more deaths while treating fewer people--but should they be further modified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155805
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Douglas G Manuel
Sarah Wilson
Sarah Maaten
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. doug.manuel@ices.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):617-20
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - genetics - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Dyslipidemias - drug therapy - genetics - mortality
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
When clinical guidelines affect large numbers of individuals or substantial resources, it is important to understand their benefits, harms and costs from a population perspective. Many countries' dyslipidemia guidelines include these perspectives.
To compare the effectiveness and efficiency of the 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines for statin treatment in reducing deaths from coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Canadian population.
The 2003 and 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines were applied to data from the Canadian Heart Health Survey (weighted sample of 12,300,000 people), which includes information on family history and physical measurements, including fasting lipid profiles. The number of people recommended for statin treatment, the potential number of CAD deaths avoided and the number needed to treat to avoid one CAD death with five years of statin therapy were determined for each guideline.
Compared with the 2003 guidelines, 1.4% fewer people (20 to 74 years of age) are recommended statin treatment, potentially preventing 7% more CAD deaths. The number needed to treat to prevent one CAD death over five years decreased from 172 (2003 guideline) to 147 (2006 guideline).
From a population perspective, the 2006 Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations are an improvement of earlier versions, preventing more CAD events and deaths with fewer statin prescriptions. Despite these improvements, the Canadian dyslipidemia recommendations should explicitly address issues of absolute benefit and cost-effectiveness in future revisions.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Apr 12;172(8):1027-3115824409
Cites: Heart. 2005 Dec;91 Suppl 5:v1-5216365341
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 18;332(7542):659-6216543339
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jun 17;332(7555):141916737980
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):913-2716971976
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):168-917240267
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):62118697284
PubMed ID
18685741 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2012 SAGE wait times program: Survey of Access to GastroEnterology in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115731
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Desmond Leddin
David Armstrong
Mark Borgaonkar
Ronald J Bridges
Carlo A Fallone
Jennifer J Telford
Ying Chen
Palma Colacino
Paul Sinclair
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;27(2):83-9
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Colonoscopy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gastroenterology - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Periodically surveying wait times for specialist health services in Canada captures current data and enables comparisons with previous surveys to identify changes over time.
During one week in April 2012, Canadian gastroenterologists were asked to complete a questionnaire (online or by fax) recording demographics, reason for referral, and dates of referral and specialist visits for at least 10 consecutive new patients (five consultations and five procedures) who had not been seen previously for the same indication. Wait times were determined for 18 indications and compared with those from similar surveys conducted in 2008 and 2005.
Data regarding adult patients were provided by 173 gastroenterologists for 1374 consultations, 540 procedures and 293 same-day consultations and procedures. Nationally, the median wait times were 92 days (95% CI 85 days to 100 days) from referral to consultation, 55 days (95% CI 50 days to 61 days) from consultation to procedure and 155 days (95% CI 142 days to 175 days) (total) from referral to procedure. Overall, wait times were longer in 2012 than in 2005 (P
Notes
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jun;20(6):411-2316779459
Cites: Colorectal Dis. 2006 Jul;8(6):480-316784466
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):478-8117335442
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):155-6018299734
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb;22(2):161-718299735
Cites: Healthc Q. 2009;12(3):72-919553768
Cites: Health Manag Technol. 2012 Mar;33(3):12-322515048
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):33-920186354
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e2720584706
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Feb;25(2):78-8221321678
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2011 Oct;25(10):547-5422059159
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2012 Jan;26(1):17-3122308578
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2010 Jan;24(1):20-520186352
PubMed ID
23472243 View in PubMed
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The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worldviews and cultural safety transforming sexual assault service provision for children and young people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107796
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Leticia Funston
Author Affiliation
NSW Health Education Centre Against Violence, Locked Bag 7118, Parramatta BC, NSW 2150, Australia. Leticia.Funston@swahs.health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Child Health Services
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - ethnology
Social Work
Abstract
Child Sexual Assault (CSA) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP), families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both "victim" and "those who sexually harm others" services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between "victims" and "those who sexually harm" services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services.
Notes
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2007 Dec;40(3-4):290-30017906926
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2010 Jul;34 Suppl 1:S87-9220618302
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2013 Jun;58(3):469-8323178922
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Aug;121(8):563-71; discussion 572-717568641
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2010 Mar;45(1-2):124-3820087761
Cites: Trauma Violence Abuse. 2010 Apr;11(2):59-7020430798
PubMed ID
23975109 View in PubMed
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2999 records – page 1 of 300.