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1384 records – page 1 of 139.

The 2-year costs and effects of a public health nursing case management intervention on mood-disordered single parents on social assistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191135
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Maureen Markle-Reid
Gina Browne
Jacqueline Roberts
Amiram Gafni
Carolyn Byrne
Author Affiliation
System-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilization, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Room 3N46, 1200 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. mreid@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Eval Clin Pract. 2002 Feb;8(1):45-59
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Case Management - economics
Child
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Depressive Disorder - economics - nursing - rehabilitation
Employment
Female
Health Care Costs
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Ontario
Public Assistance
Public Health Nursing - economics
Single Parent - psychology
Social Adjustment
Abstract
This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the 2-year costs and effects of a proactive, public health nursing case management approach compared with a self-directed approach for 129 single parents (98% were mothers) on social assistance in a Canadian setting. A total of 43% of these parents had a major depressive disorder and 38% had two or three other health conditions at baseline.
Study participants were recruited over a 12 month period and randomized into two groups: one receiving proactive public health nursing and one which did not.
At 2 years, 69 single parents with 123 children receiving proactive public health nursing (compared with 60 parents with 91 children who did not receive public health nursing services) showed a slightly greater reduction in dysthymia and slightly higher social adjustment. There was no difference between the public health and control groups in total per parent annual cost of health and support services. However, costs were averted due to a 12% difference in non-use of social assistance in the previous 12 months for parents in the public health nursing group. This translates into an annual cost saving of 240,000 dollars (Canadian) of costs averted within 1 year for every 100 parents.
In the context of a system of national health and social insurance, this study supports the fact that it is no more costly to proactively service this population of parents on social assistance.
PubMed ID
11882101 View in PubMed
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A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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[100,000 more adults visit the dentist: a few results of November 1989]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73759
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
J. Grytten
D. Holst
I. Rossow
O. Vasend
N. Wang
Author Affiliation
Odontologiske Fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1990 Jun;100(10):414-22
Date
Jun-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
DMF Index
Dental Care - economics - psychology
Dental Health Services - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the Norwegian adult population according to: 1. number of teeth present, 2. demand and utilization of dental services, 3. travel time from home to the dentist, 4. dental health behaviour, 5. fear for dental treatment. The analyses were performed on a set of national data collected in 1989, which was representative of the non-institutionalized Norwegian population 20 years and above. The sample size was 1260 individuals. About 75% of the people had 20 teeth or more present. Nine percent were edentulous. Seventy-seven percent who had demanded dental services during the last year. The average expenditure for dental treatment for those who had demanded the services during the last year was NOK 826. Fifty-three percent travelled 15 minutes or less from home to the dentist. Eighteen percent travelled 30 minutes or more. Almost everybody with their own teeth present brushed their teeth regularly once a day. Thirty-three percent of all dentate people used woodsticks regularly once a day, while 20% used toothfloss regularly. Seventy-five percent had no to mild fear of the dentist, while 7% had a strong fear. Fear of the dentist was higher among women than among men. Fear of the dentist decreased by increasing age. Few people, less than 4%, had cancelled a dental appointment because of dental anxiety. There has been an improvement in dental health and dental health behaviour in Norway during the 1970's and 1980's. These improvements are discussed with special attention paid to the findings from the present study.
PubMed ID
2247358 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal physician use in Canada: location, orientation and identity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209126
Source
Health Econ. 1997 Mar-Apr;6(2):197-207
Publication Type
Article
Author
K B Newbold
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801, USA. newbold@uiuc.edu
Source
Health Econ. 1997 Mar-Apr;6(2):197-207
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Health Services - utilization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The main objectives of this paper are to compare Aboriginal and Canadian health status and physician use and to identify the factors associated with the use of physician services. Data are drawn from the 1991 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the 1991 General Social Survey (GSS), which are weighted random samples of the Aboriginal and total Canadian populations, respectively. The results demonstrate that Aboriginals were much less likely to use physician services, even though Aboriginals rank their health similarly to the total Canadian population. Location becomes an important aspect of both physician use and health status, with Aboriginals residing on-reserve generally having lower levels of self-assessed health and less likely to have seen a physician. While Aboriginals with the poorest health status were more likely to have seen a physician, other factors including education were found to be barriers to use of health care. Aboriginal identity and cultural orientation provided mixed results.
PubMed ID
9158971 View in PubMed
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Access and utilization: a continuum of health service environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211173
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
M W Rosenberg
N T Hanlon
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1996 Sep;43(6):975-83
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Facility Environment - standards
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Income
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Abstract
Birch and Abelson [1] argue that non-income based barriers might explain differences in utilization of health services within and between income groups. Databases which contain utilization data rarely allow for the modelling of geographic variation. In the Ontario Health Survey (OHS), individual observations are georeferenced at the Public Health Unit (PHU) scale, but PHUs cannot easily be used because of the large coefficients of variation. To overcome this problem, a cluster analysis is performed to create a service environment variable, which reflects differences in service availability, population size and rurality. Utilization of health services is then modelled as a logistic regression equation where the independent variables are age, sex, service environment and income to test the Birch and Abelson argument. This argument is then extended by controlling for age, health and income status. Based on the modelling results, the importance of geography to access and utilization is assessed.
PubMed ID
8888467 View in PubMed
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Accessing health care utilization databases for health research: a Canadian longitudinal study on aging feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147705
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Parminder S Raina
Susan A Kirkland
Christina Wolfson
Karen Szala-Meneok
Lauren E Griffith
Homa Keshavarz
Jennifer Uniat
Linda Furlini
Camille L Angus
Geoff Strople
Amélie Pelletier
Author Affiliation
McMaster Evidence-based Practice Center, McMaster University, Canada. praina@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Feasibility Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Medical Record Linkage
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
ABSTRACTOne of the keys to the success of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) will be the leveraging of secondary data sources, particularly health care utilization (HCU) data. To examine the practical, methodological, and ethical aspects of accessing HCU data, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 data stewards and privacy commissioners/ombudsmen from across Canada. Study participants indicated that obtaining permission to access HCU data is generally possible; however, they noted that this will be a complex and lengthy process requiring considerable and meticulous preparatory work to ensure proper documentation and compliance with jurisdictional variations along legislative and policy lines.
PubMed ID
19860983 View in PubMed
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Access to care in the Indian Health Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6178
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1993;12(3):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
P J Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Center for General Health Services Intramural Research, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Rockville, MD.
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1993;12(3):224-33
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Eligibility Determination
Employment
Female
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service - utilization
Abstract
The Indian Health Service (IHS) is unique among U.S. private and public health programs in that free comprehensive health services are provided to eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives regardless of their ability to pay. However, resource limitations may compel some eligible persons to go outside of the IHS system to receive health care. Although IHS eligibles have comparatively low rates of private or public health care coverage, and much of this population lives in underserved areas, over half of IHS-eligible persons had some type of out-of-plan use in 1987. Furthermore, services received through private providers appear to supplement those received through IHS-sponsored providers. Overall, persons who use both IHS and non-IHS providers have higher levels of health care use than do those who rely exclusively on the IHS.
PubMed ID
8244235 View in PubMed
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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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1384 records – page 1 of 139.