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840 records – page 1 of 84.

A 50-Year Commitment to American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304709
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2020
Author
Alan G Waxman
William H J Haffner
Jean Howe
Kathleen Wilder
Tony Ogburn
Neil Murphy
Eve Espey
J Martin Tucker
Amanda Bruegl
Elaine Locke
Yvonne Malloy
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; the Northern Navajo Medical Center, Shiprock, New Mexico; the Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, Oregon; the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas; the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska; the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi; the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaskan Natives
Female
Gynecology
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - standards - trends
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Intersectoral Collaboration
Obstetrics
Program Evaluation
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Urban Health Services - standards
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards - trends
Abstract
Since 1970, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Women's Health has partnered with the Indian Health Service and health care facilities serving Native American women to improve quality of care in both rural and urban settings. Needs assessments have included formal surveys, expert panels, consensus conferences, and onsite program reviews. Improved care has been achieved through continuing professional education, recruitment of volunteer obstetrician-gynecologists, advocacy, and close collaboration at the local and national levels. The inclusive and multifaceted approach of this program should provide an effective model for collaborations between specialty societies and health care professionals providing primary care services that can reduce health disparities in underserved populations.
PubMed ID
32925622 View in PubMed
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[About 21,000 people per day receive support from services for mentally retarded: treatment level and occupational activities of the weak is lacking].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248514
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1978 Jun 7;78(22):8-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1978
Author
K U Laursen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1978 Jun 7;78(22):8-9
Date
Jun-7-1978
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Mental Health Services - standards
Quality of Life
PubMed ID
249095 View in PubMed
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Accessing maternity care in rural Canada: there's more to the story than distance to a doctor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155499
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Sep;29(8):863-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Rebecca Sutherns
Ivy Lynn Bourgeault
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2008 Sep;29(8):863-83
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alberta
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Maternal Health Services - methods - trends
Medically underserved area
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods - trends
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Rural Health Services - standards - trends
Rural Population
Abstract
Drawing upon a comparative, qualitative study of the experiences of rural women accessing maternity care in two Canadian provinces, we demonstrate that availability of services, having economic and informational resources to access the services offered, and the appropriateness of those services in terms of gender, continuity of care, confidentiality, quality of care, and cultural fit are key to an accurate understanding of health care access. We explore the implications of living rurally on each of these dimensions, thereby revealing both gaps in and solutions to rural maternity care access that narrower, proximity-based definitions miss.
PubMed ID
18726796 View in PubMed
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Access to and continuity of primary medical care of different providers as perceived by the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164689
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Pirjo Halonen
Arto Vehviläinen
Jorma Takala
Esko Kumpusalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Unit of Family Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pekka.mantyselka@uku.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study people's views on the accessibility and continuity of primary medical care provided by different providers: a public primary healthcare centre (PPHC), occupational healthcare (OHC), and a private practice (PP).
A nationwide population-based questionnaire study.
Finland.
A total of 6437 (from a sample of 10,000) Finns aged 15-74 years.
Period of time (in days) to get an appointment with any physician was assessed via a single structured question. Accessibility and continuity were evaluated with a five-category Likert scale. Values 4-5 were regarded as good.
Altogether 72% had found that they could obtain an appointment with a physician within three days, while 6% had to wait more than two weeks. Older subjects and subjects with chronic diseases perceived waiting times as longer more often than younger subjects and those without chronic diseases. The proportion of subjects who perceived access to care to be good was 35% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 78% in a PP. The proportion of subjects who were able to get successive appointments with the same doctor was 45% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 81% in a PP. A personal doctor system was related to good continuity and access in a PPHC.
Access to and continuity of care in Finland are suboptimal for people suffering from chronic diseases. The core features of good primary healthcare are still not available within the medical care provided by public health centres.
Notes
Cites: Fam Pract. 2000 Jun;17(3):236-4210846142
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2000 Nov;50(460):882-711141874
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Jun;19(2):131-4411482415
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2002 Jun;52(479):459-6212051209
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1403-1712479503
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):140-416923622
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Dec;10(4):290-41480869
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;53(12):974-8015581440
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 17;174(2):177-8316415462
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):1-216464807
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;1(3):149-5515043376
PubMed ID
17354156 View in PubMed
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Access to colposcopy services for high-risk Canadian women: can we do better?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177878
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):346-51
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gina S Ogilvie
Elizabeth A Shaw
Sandra P Lusk
Joyce Zazulak
Janusz A Kaczorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. gina.ogilvie@bccdc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):346-51
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Canada
Colposcopy - utilization
Community health centers - standards
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite overall decreasing mortality from cervical cancer, selected groups of Canadian women continue to have suboptimal access to diagnostic and treatment interventions for cervical cancer. In this paper, we present an evaluation of a colposcopy program developed to improve attendance for colposcopy in a lower socio-economic and immigrant population.
All women attending the North Hamilton Community Health Centre (CHC) who required colposcopic assessment and were referred to a newly developed colposcopy program based at the CHC were evaluated. Attendance rates for consultation, follow up and treatment in women referred for colposcopy were compared retrospectively for the CHC-based colposcopy program and concurrently with the regional colposcopy clinic (RCC).
Women referred to the CHC colposcopy program had a significant reduction in their no-show rate after the introduction of the locally based colposcopy program (17.2% vs. 1.3%, p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;95(5):325-815490919
PubMed ID
15490923 View in PubMed
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[Access to general practitioners in a county in Troms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70574
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2005
Author
Anne Helen Hansen
Ivar J Aaraas
Jorun Støvne Pettersen
Gerd Ersdal
Author Affiliation
Tromsø kommune, Rådhuset, 9299 Tromsø. anne.helen.hansen@tromso.kommune.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Date
Aug-25-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Urban Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Norwegian Board of Health made a survey of the accessibility of general practitioners in Troms county in North Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a telephone interview one secretary in each surgery informed about telephone response time, planned time for telephone consultations, recorded numbers of urgent consultations, and waiting time to obtain a routine consultation. RESULTS: On average, the planned telephone time was two hours per week. Telephone time was in inverse proportion to the number of patients on the doctor's list. Rural doctors spent twice as much time as urban colleagues on the telephone with their patients. Doctors with lists between 500 and 1500 patients had a higher proportion of urgent consultations compared with doctors with shorter or longer lists. INTERPRETATION: Telephone response time below two minutes and waiting times for routine consultations below 20 days appear to be within acceptable norms. When patient lists are above 1500, doctors' capacity to offer telephone contact and emergency services to their patients seems reduced.
PubMed ID
16138139 View in PubMed
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Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278579
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
A. Lie
O. Bjørnstad
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Medicine
Pilot Projects
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented.
To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation.
A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011.
The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process.
The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey.
Notes
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):159-6312216773
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):173-712216775
PubMed ID
26276757 View in PubMed
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[Accreditation visit. An enriching experience].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235217
Source
Nurs Que. 1987 May-Jun;7(3):59
Publication Type
Article

Achieving full compliance with standards for assertive community treatment programs in Ontario: does sponsoring agency type matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133114
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2010;23(3):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Glen E Randall
Patricia A Wakefield
Author Affiliation
DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. randalg@mcmaster.ca
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2010;23(3):126-31
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Ontario - epidemiology
Abstract
Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) programs provide community-based services for individuals with severe mental illness. In Ontario, these programs are funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and administered through sponsoring agencies (hospitals, mental health facilities, and "other" community-based organizations). This article reports on the results of a survey of ACT programs and investigates the relationship between sponsoring agency type and ACT program operations. Findings and implications for policy makers and administrators are discussed.
PubMed ID
21739825 View in PubMed
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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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840 records – page 1 of 84.