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[A functional model of a state district ophthalmologic clinic under the budget-deficit conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182998
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2003 Sep-Oct;119(5):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Zharov
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2003 Sep-Oct;119(5):40-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Eye Diseases - economics - surgery - therapy
Health Services - economics - standards
Humans
Russia
PubMed ID
14598495 View in PubMed
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Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122368
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Michael E Green
William Hogg
Colleen Savage
Sharon Johnston
Grant Russell
R Liisa Jaakkimainen
Richard H Glazier
Janet Barnsley
Richard Birtwhistle
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. michael.green@dfm.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Medical Audit - methods
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Credit and Collection
Patients - psychology
Physicians, Family - psychology - standards
Preventive Health Services - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Class
Abstract
To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC) practices.
This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30) were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources.
Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening.
Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and consent to, the collection and linkage of information from multiple sources that would be required for such assessments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22824551 View in PubMed
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Baseline status of paediatric oncology care in ten low-income or mid-income countries receiving My Child Matters support: a descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92673
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):721-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Ribeiro Raul C
Steliarova-Foucher Eva
Magrath Ian
Lemerle Jean
Eden Tim
Forget Caty
Mortara Isabel
Tabah-Fisch Isabelle
Divino Jose Julio
Miklavec Thomas
Howard Scott C
Cavalli Franco
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and International Outreach Program, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA. raul.ribeiro@stjude.org
Source
Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):721-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - economics - standards
Child Welfare - economics
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developing Countries
Female
Financial Support
Health Care Surveys
Health Expenditures
Humans
Income
Infant
Male
Medical Oncology - economics - organization & administration - standards
Neoplasms - mortality - therapy
Pediatrics - economics - standards
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Childhood-cancer survival is dismal in most low-income countries, but initiatives for treating paediatric cancer have substantially improved care in some of these countries. The My Child Matters programme was launched to fund projects aimed at controlling paediatric cancer in low-income and mid-income countries. We aimed to assess baseline status of paediatric cancer care in ten countries that were receiving support (Bangladesh, Egypt, Honduras, Morocco, the Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, Ukraine, Venezuela, and Vietnam). METHODS: Between Sept 5, 2005, and May 26, 2006, qualitative face-to-face interviews with clinicians, hospital managers, health officials, and other health-care professionals were done by a multidisciplinary public-health research company as a field survey. Estimates of expected numbers of patients with paediatric cancer from population-based data were used to project the number of current and future patients for comparison with survey-based data. 5-year survival was postulated on the basis of the findings of the interviews. Data from the field survey were statistically compared with demographic, health, and socioeconomic data from global health organisations. The main outcomes were to assess baseline status of paediatric cancer care in the countries and postulated 5-year survival. FINDINGS: The baseline status of paediatric oncology care varied substantially between the surveyed countries. The number of patients reportedly receiving medical care (obtained from survey data) differed markedly from that predicted by population-based incidence data. Management of paediatric cancer and access to care were poor or deficient (ie, nonexistent, unavailable, or inconsistent access for most children with cancer) in seven of the ten countries surveyed, and accurate baseline data on incidence and outcome were very sparse. Postulated 5-year survival were: 5-10% in Bangladesh, the Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, and Vietnam; 30% in Morocco; and 40-60% in Egypt, Honduras, Ukraine, and Venezuela. Postulated 5-year survival was directly proportional to several health indicators (per capita annual total health-care expenditure [Pearson's r(2)=0.760, p=0.001], per capita gross domestic product [r(2)=0.603, p=0.008], per capita gross national income [r(2)=0.572, p=0.011], number of physicians [r(2)=0.560, p=0.013] and nurses [r(2)=0.506, p=0.032] per 1000 population, and most significantly, annual government health-care expenditure per capita [r(2)=0.882, p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet Oncol. 2008 Aug;9(8):703-418672209
PubMed ID
18672210 View in PubMed
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Beyond Romanow: the future of women's health care in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188011
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Oct;24(10):813-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
André B Lalonde
Author Affiliation
Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2002 Oct;24(10):813-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Financing, Government - standards - trends
Forecasting
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - standards - trends
Needs Assessment
Pregnancy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Total Quality Management
Women's health
Women's Health Services - economics - standards - trends
Abstract
In November 2002, the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada, headed by Mr. Roy J. Romanow, will deliver its final report to the Governor-in-Council of Canada. In October 2001 the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (SOGC) submitted to Mr. Romanow concrete ideas and proposed actions to improve the health of Canadian women and their families, and to sustain and strengthen Canada's publicly funded health care system, in its report Ensuring Women's Health: Options for the Future of Canada's Health Care System. This Commentary brings to you the thoughts that the SOGC will continue to forward after the Romanow Commission's report is delivered next month.
PubMed ID
12399808 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Child health services in the USA respective Sweden. A comparison does not support cost savings in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34753
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jun 19;93(25):2406-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1996
Author
L. Jerdén
Author Affiliation
VÃ¥rdcentralen Tisken, Falun.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Jun 19;93(25):2406-7
Date
Jun-19-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - economics - standards
Comparative Study
Cost Savings
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Costs
Health Care Rationing
Health Resources
Humans
Sweden
United States
PubMed ID
8684049 View in PubMed
Less detail

Client satisfaction with home care services in rural Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169613
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2006;18(1):87-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Raymond Struyk
Anastasia Alexandrova
Igor Belyakov
Kirill Chagin
Author Affiliation
The Urban Institute, August Siebert Strasse 16A, Washington, DC 20037, USA. RStruyk@ui.urban.org
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 2006;18(1):87-105
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Frail Elderly - psychology
Health Status Indicators
Home Care Services - economics - standards
Humans
Male
Models, organizational
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Poverty
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - economics - standards
Russia
Social Support
Abstract
The objective of this work is to explore the satisfaction of a sample of 300 frail elders living in a rural Russian area with the support services provided by social service agency staff. The client population lives in extremely difficult conditions in terms of housing and associated communal services. They reported very high levels of satisfaction with the agency-provided services, both general satisfaction and their satisfaction with the specific services received during the reference visit inquired about by the interviewer. The degree of satisfaction is likely related to the difficulty of their living environment and their probable poverty, as well as the quality of services received. Attempts to relate the variance in the satisfaction ratings to the extent of activity limitations and the volume of formal and informal care using multivariate analysis met with limited success, owing in part, at least, to the limited variance in the dependent variables. Nevertheless, the patterns identified are broadly consistent with expectations based on modeling previously done for the U.S. populations receiving at-home care. The results clearly indicate the value of providing such services to frail elders in such circumstances.
PubMed ID
16635982 View in PubMed
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[Cost differences of the occupational health services. A comparative analysis of 2 Volvo companies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73157
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Aug 10;91(32-33):2868-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-1994
Author
L. Dimberg
J. Ferraz-Nunes
Author Affiliation
Koncernläkare vid AB Volvo, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Aug 10;91(32-33):2868-73
Date
Aug-10-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automobiles
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Health Services - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sweden
PubMed ID
7983927 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effectiveness and cost comparison of two strategies for hepatitis B vaccination of schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186677
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):64-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maryse Guay
Anne-Marie Clouâtre
Manon Blackburn
Geneviève Baron
Philippe De Wals
Chantale Roy
Jean Desrochers
François Milord
Author Affiliation
Direction de la santé publique, de la planification et de l'évaluation, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de la Montérégie, Longueuil, QC. m.guay@rrss16@gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Jan-Feb;94(1):64-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Community Health Centers - economics - standards
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Hepatitis B - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - economics
Humans
Immunization Programs - economics - organization & administration - utilization
Male
Program Evaluation
Quebec
School Health Services - economics - standards
Abstract
In 1994, immunization against hepatitis B was implemented in schools in Quebec, targeting grade 4 students. In 1996-1997 and 1997-1998, one Local Community Service Centre (CLSC) replaced the school-based program in its district with vaccination offered in community clinics after school hours. The aim of the current study was to compare the effectiveness and costs of school-based and clinic-based programs.
Vaccination coverage data were collected in the CLSC with the clinic-based program (CBP), and in three matched CLSCs with a school-based program (SBP), from 1994 to 2000. Surveys were conducted to estimate costs to parents, to schools and to CLSCs in 1997-1998.
With the implementation of the CBP, the vaccination coverage fell to 73%, compared with over 90% in the SBPs. Coverage increased to 90% when the CBP was abandoned. Costs to the CLSC were not much lower in the CBP. Societal costs were $63 per student vaccinated in the CBP, and
PubMed ID
12583682 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of a home visit to prevent childhood injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193854
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):382-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
W J King
T P Klassen
J. LeBlanc
A C Bernard-Bonnin
Y. Robitaille
B. Pham
D. Coyle
M. Tenenbein
I B Pless
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. king@cheo.on.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Aug;108(2):382-8
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - economics - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child Health Services - economics - standards
Child, Preschool
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
House Calls - economics - utilization
Humans
Infant
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - economics - standards
Safety - standards
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To examine the effectiveness of a home visit program to improve home safety and decrease the frequency of injury in children. We examined the effects of the program on 1) parental injury awareness and knowledge; 2) the extent that families used home safety measures; 3) the rate of injury; and 4) the cost effectiveness of the intervention.
A randomized, controlled trial.
A multicenter trial conducted at 5 hospitals in 4 Canadian urban centers.
Children
PubMed ID
11483803 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of family practice maternity care. A cross-cultural and environmental view.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220340
Source
Prim Care. 1993 Sep;20(3):523-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993
Author
M. Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Prim Care. 1993 Sep;20(3):523-36
Date
Sep-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Family Practice - economics - standards - trends
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - economics - standards - trends
Medical Audit
Obstetrics - standards
Pregnancy
Abstract
All 17 studies of family practice maternity care have shown reduced procedure rates for comparable populations of women cared for by family physicians versus those cared for by obstetricians, while maternal and infant outcomes are as good or better for the patients of family practitioners. System issues are the most predictive of positive outcomes such that in settings in which continuity and intimacy is high and women of no defined risk are cared for by providers specifically oriented to such care, outcomes are the best. In contrast, when such women are cared for by providers specifically oriented for high-risk or tertiary settings, their care becomes medicalized and they become sick. Staff attitudes, rules, and organizational structures are more predictive of outcome than professional labels. Family physicians in all settings can do more to lower their intervention rates and "humanize" care.
PubMed ID
8378449 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.