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1052 records – page 1 of 106.

[1,4 billions crowns to 1 881 projects renew rehabilitation and habilitation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202185
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-1999
Author
G. Wallgrund
G. Grimby
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Apr 14;96(15):1823
Date
Apr-14-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - economics - trends
Humans
Rehabilitation - economics - methods - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
10319646 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-1981
Author
P. Baume
Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Date
Oct-17-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
PubMed ID
7321959 View in PubMed
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[About health care profit: USA is not a model!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161515
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bror Gårdelöf
Author Affiliation
Bror.Gardelov@lio.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Health Policy - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Private Sector
Sweden
United States
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2007 Jul 11-24;104(28-29):2091-217702384
PubMed ID
17822208 View in PubMed
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About the method of studying medical assistance management for rheumatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246390
Source
Sante Publique (Bucur). 1980;23(4):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980

Access and care: reports from Canadian dental education and care agencies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173771
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
James L Leake
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. james.leake@utoronto.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;71(7):469-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Dental Care for Aged - organization & administration
Dental Clinics - economics
Dental Health Services - economics - utilization
Education, Dental - economics
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Poverty
Abstract
Representatives of faculties of dentistry and agencies working to improve the oral health of groups with restricted access to dental care were invited to address the access and care symposium held in Toronto in May 2004. They told of their clients" sometimes desperate needs in graphic terms. The agencies" response ranged from simple documentation of the need, to expression of frustration with current trends and the apparent indifference of policy makers, to the achievement of some success in arranging alternative models of care. The presenters consistently identified the need to change methods of financing dental education and both the financing and models of care delivery to meet the needs of those with restricted access to oral health care.
PubMed ID
16026632 View in PubMed
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Access to dental care for low-income adults: perceptions of affordability, availability and acceptability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134419
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Bruce B Wallace
Michael I Macentee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Dentistry, University of British Columbia, 2199 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3, Canada. bbw@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Community Health. 2012 Feb;37(1):32-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Community Health Services - economics
Dental Care - economics
Dentists - psychology
Female
Health Services Accessibility - economics
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Poverty
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Social Work
Vulnerable Populations
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to explore access to dental care for low-income communities from the perspectives of low-income people, dentists and related health and social service-providers. The case study included 60 interviews involving, low-income adults (N = 41), dentists (N = 6) and health and social service-providers (N = 13). The analysis explores perceptions of need, evidence of unmet needs, and three dimensions of access--affordability, availability and acceptability. The study describes the sometimes poor fit between private dental practice and the public oral health needs of low-income individuals. Dentists and low-income patients alike explained how the current model of private dental practice and fee-for-service payments do not work well because of patients' concerns about the cost of dentistry, dentists' reluctance to treat this population, and the cultural incompatibility of most private practices to the needs of low-income communities. There is a poor fit between private practice dentistry, public dental benefits and the oral health needs of low-income communities, and other responses are needed to address the multiple dimensions of access to dentistry, including community dental clinics sensitive to the special needs of low-income people.
PubMed ID
21590434 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;56(7):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Rajamannar Ramasubbu
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Jul;56(7):1-8
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Accessibility - economics - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - economics
Mental Health Services - economics - trends - utilization
PubMed ID
21835100 View in PubMed
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Access to syringes in three Russian cities: implications for syringe distribution and coverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158518
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anya Sarang
Tim Rhodes
Lucy Platt
Author Affiliation
Russian Harm Reduction Network, Ilimskaya Street, 4-1-38, 127576 Moscow, Russia. anyasarang@gmail.com
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - utilization
Pharmacies - organization & administration
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Syringes - supply & distribution
Urban Health Services - supply & distribution
Abstract
We report findings from a multi-method study investigating drug injectors' access to needles and syringes in three large Russian cities (Moscow, Volgograd, Barnaul).
We undertook 209 qualitative interviews among drug injectors, and supplemented these with baseline data from a community-recruited survey of 1473 drug injectors.
Almost all (93%; 1277) injectors used pharmacies as their main source of clean injecting equipment, and only 7% (105) reported ever having had contact with city syringe exchange projects. Good access to syringes has coincided with the expansion of private pharmacies. Key factors contributing to pharmacy access included: geographic proximity; low cost; and the restrictive policies of exchange instituted at local syringe exchanges. A fear of police interference surrounded the use of pharmacies and syringe exchanges, and fed a reluctance to carry used needles and syringes, which in turn acted as a disincentive to syringe exchange attendance. The perceived benefits of syringe exchanges over pharmacies included the additional health services on offer and the social support provided, but these benefits were over-shadowed by disadvantages. Multivariable analyses of survey data in two cities show no differences on account of risk behaviour among injectors sourcing equipment from pharmacies compared to syringe exchanges.
HIV prevention coverage indicators need to include measures of pharmacy-based syringe distribution and not only measures of syringe exchange coverage. There is an urgent need to pilot pharmacy-based distribution and exchange projects in Russia as well as other forms of secondary syringe distribution. Alongside expanding the reach of dedicated syringe exchange projects, pharmacy-based syringe distribution, and exchange, may help improve coverage of cost effective HIV prevention measures targeting drug injectors.
PubMed ID
18313910 View in PubMed
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Accountability in Canada's Muskoka Initiative questioned.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104322
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2014
Author
Paul C Webster
Source
Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1621-2
Date
May-10-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Health Services - economics
Child Welfare - economics
Female
Humans
Maternal Health Services - economics
Maternal Welfare - economics
Pregnancy
Social Responsibility
Notes
Erratum In: Lancet. 2014 May 31;383(9932):e18
PubMed ID
24822257 View in PubMed
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1052 records – page 1 of 106.