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233 records – page 1 of 24.

21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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The Aboriginal tea ceremony: its relevance to psychiatric practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160645
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ernest Hunter
Author Affiliation
Remote Area Mental Health Service, Queensland Health, Queensland, Australia. Ernest_hunter@health.qld.gov.au
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Ceremonial Behavior
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional-Patient Relations
Tea
Abstract
To examine the elements of the Aboriginal tea ceremony and its relevance to psychiatric practice.
Through the Aboriginal tea ceremony, the mental health professional is able to convey that care and concern balance experience and expertise. These underpinning principles have wide application.
PubMed ID
17957527 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
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Addressing health inequities through indigenous involvement in health-policy discourses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121593
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):108-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Alycia J Fridkin
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):108-22
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Although the health of Indigenous peoples is affected by structural inequities, interventions to address health inequities are often focused locally rather than at a structural level where they could play a transformative role. Addressing structural health inequities by involving Indigenous peoples in health-policy discourses can serve to address power imbalances that are implicit in policymaking processes. Using an analytical framework based on interdisciplinary perspectives rooted in critical and decolonizing approaches, the author presents a discussion of theoretical considerations for including Indigenous peoples in policy discourses as a means of addressing health inequities. She argues that the involvement of Indigenous peoples in health-policy discourses has the potential to mitigate epistemological colonialism, push forward an agenda of decolonization, and address health inequities caused by inequitable systems of power. The article concludes with suggestions for future research and implications for nursing and health professionals of addressing structural inequities through attention to policy discourses.
PubMed ID
22894009 View in PubMed
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Advancing HIV/AIDS prevention among American Indians through capacity building and the community readiness model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166148
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Pamela Jumper Thurman
Irene S Vernon
Barbara Plested
Author Affiliation
Center for Applied Studies in American Ethnicity, Colorado State University, Ft Collins 80523, USA. pjthurman@aol.com
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 Jan;Suppl:S49-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Cultural Diversity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Financing, Government
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Planning Technical Assistance
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Models, organizational
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Public Health Administration
Social Marketing
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Although HIV/AIDS prevention has presented challenges over the past 25 years, prevention does work! To be most effective, however, prevention must be specific to the culture and the nature of the community. Building the capacity of a community for prevention efforts is not an easy process. If capacity is to be sustained, it must be practical and utilize the resources that already exist in the community. Attitudes vary across communities; resources vary, political climates are constantly varied and changing. Communities are fluid-always changing, adapting, growing. They are "ready" for different things at different times. Readiness is a key issue! This article presents a model that has experienced a high level of success in building community capacity for effective prevention/intervention for HIV/AIDS and offers case studies for review. The Community Readiness Model provides both quantitative and qualitative information in a user-friendly structure that guides a community through the process of understanding the importance of the measure of readiness. The model identifies readiness- appropriate strategies, provides readiness scores for evaluation, and most important, involves community stakeholders in the process. The article will demonstrate the importance of developing strategies consistent with readiness levels for more cost-effective and successful prevention efforts.
PubMed ID
17159467 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native 'grass roots' movement: problem solving utilizing indigenous values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1539
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1985; 40:84-91.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
Mala, T.A.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1985; 40:84-91.
Date
1985
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Drug abuse
Community health aides
Traditional healing
Acculturation
Alaska
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Inuits
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1593.
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American Indians and Alaska Natives: breastfeeding disparities and resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140103
Source
Breastfeed Med. 2010 Oct;5(5):219-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010

Amorphous practice: nursing in a remote Indigenous community of Australia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167146
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):191-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Jennifer Helen Cramer
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):191-202
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Patient care team
Peer Group
Abstract
Nurses are key providers of health care in remote Indigenous communities throughout Australia. Evidence of nurses' actual practice and the outcomes of their care for clients in this context, however, is lacking. This exploratory research describes how nursing is practised in a remote Aboriginal community and reveals many anomalies. The overall theme, termed amorphous practice, defines the changeable character of practice from nurse to nurse and from situation to situation. The themes underlying amorphous practice are termed detachment, diffusion, and beyond the nursing domain. Each theme is described by way of its characteristics, the strategies nurses use to deal with the situation, and the consequences. The significance of these findings raise concerns for the accountability of nursing and most of all for the rights of Indigenous people in remote areas to basic standards of safe health care.
PubMed ID
17026426 View in PubMed
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Analyzing the state of community health nursing: advancing from deficit to strengths-based practice using appreciative inquiry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159544
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Candace Lind
Dawn Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. cylind@ucalgary.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
In this article we critically analyze the disconnect between much of the contemporary discourse and practice in Canadian community health nursing (CHN) that has contributed to the slow progress of strengths-based, health-promoting nursing practice. Appreciative inquiry philosophy and methods are introduced as a bridge to traverse this disciplinary gap. Two exemplars show how appreciative, strengths-based CHN research and action can move policies and programs toward more socially just practices congruent with CHN values. Exciting potential for nursing knowledge may arise from incorporating more strengths-based approaches into practice, education, policy, and research.
PubMed ID
20531267 View in PubMed
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233 records – page 1 of 24.