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730 records – page 1 of 73.

21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worldviews and cultural safety transforming sexual assault service provision for children and young people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107796
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Leticia Funston
Author Affiliation
NSW Health Education Centre Against Violence, Locked Bag 7118, Parramatta BC, NSW 2150, Australia. Leticia.Funston@swahs.health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Child Health Services
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - ethnology
Social Work
Abstract
Child Sexual Assault (CSA) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP), families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both "victim" and "those who sexually harm others" services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between "victims" and "those who sexually harm" services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services.
Notes
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2007 Dec;40(3-4):290-30017906926
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2010 Jul;34 Suppl 1:S87-9220618302
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2013 Jun;58(3):469-8323178922
Cites: Public Health. 2007 Aug;121(8):563-71; discussion 572-717568641
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2010 Mar;45(1-2):124-3820087761
Cites: Trauma Violence Abuse. 2010 Apr;11(2):59-7020430798
PubMed ID
23975109 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal healing: regaining balance and culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171195
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Linda M Hunter
Jo Logan
Jean-Guy Goulet
Sylvia Barton
Author Affiliation
The Conference Board of Canada.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jan;17(1):13-22
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Holistic Nursing
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medicine, Traditional
Middle Aged
Spiritual Therapies
Urban Population
Abstract
This ethnographic study explored the question, How do urban-based First Nations peoples use healing traditions to address their health issues? The objectives were to examine how Aboriginal traditions addressed health issues and explore the link between such traditions and holism in nursing practice. Data collection consisted of individual interviews, participant observations, and field notes. Three major categories that emerged from the data analysis were: following a cultural path, gaining balance, and sharing in the circle of life. The global theme of healing holistically included following a cultural path by regaining culture through the use of healing traditions; gaining balance in the four realms of spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical health; and sharing in the circle of life by cultural interactions between Aboriginal peoples and non-Aboriginal health professionals. Implications for practice include incorporating the concepts of balance, holism, and cultural healing into the health care services for diverse Aboriginal peoples.
PubMed ID
16410432 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health and family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31534
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Jane McGillivray
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2002 Apr;48:680-1; author reply 681-2
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child Welfare
Empathy
Family Practice - standards
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Inuits
Newfoundland
Physician-Patient Relations
Notes
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2001 Dec;47:2444-6, 2452-511785273
PubMed ID
12046355 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health programming under siege, critics charge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120994
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2012
Author
Paul Christopher Webster
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E739-40
Date
Oct-2-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Federal Government
Financial Management - economics
Health Services Research - economics
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
Humans
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2012 Oct 16;184(15):1715-6; author reply 171623073677
PubMed ID
22949561 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal infant mortality rate in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119633
Source
Lancet. 2012 Oct 20;380(9851):1384
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2012
Author
Janet Smylie
Source
Lancet. 2012 Oct 20;380(9851):1384
Date
Oct-20-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Financing, Government - economics
Health Services, Indigenous - economics
Humans
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 2012 Jun 9;379(9832):213722690394
PubMed ID
23084452 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal maternity care resourcebook.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108542
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jul;35(7):598
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Len Kelly
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Jul;35(7):598
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bibliography as Topic
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Maternal health services
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
23876635 View in PubMed
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The Aboriginal tea ceremony: its relevance to psychiatric practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160645
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Ernest Hunter
Author Affiliation
Remote Area Mental Health Service, Queensland Health, Queensland, Australia. Ernest_hunter@health.qld.gov.au
Source
Australas Psychiatry. 2008 Apr;16(2):130-2
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages
Ceremonial Behavior
Culture
Drinking Behavior
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional-Patient Relations
Tea
Abstract
To examine the elements of the Aboriginal tea ceremony and its relevance to psychiatric practice.
Through the Aboriginal tea ceremony, the mental health professional is able to convey that care and concern balance experience and expertise. These underpinning principles have wide application.
PubMed ID
17957527 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
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Access and utilization of health services by British Columbia's rural Aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5977
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 2005;18(2-3):xxvi-xxxi
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Dennis Wardman
Ken Clement
Darryl Quantz
Author Affiliation
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur Inc Leadersh Health Serv. 2005;18(2-3):xxvi-xxxi
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - ethnology
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Abstract
PURPOSE: To provide a picture of the access and use of health services by Aboriginal British Columbians living in both reserve and off-reserve communities. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: This project represents a collaborative effort between the University of British Columbia and multiple Aboriginal community partners. Between June and November 2003, 267 face-to-face interviews were conducted with Aboriginal persons in seven rural community organizations across the province. FINDINGS: This paper reports on the results of a survey of 267 Aboriginal clients. It was found that a substantial number of survey respondents accessed health services provided by an Aboriginal person. Although most respondents felt that services were available, they also identified a number of concerns. These revolved around the need to travel for services, as well as a lack of access to more specialized services. A number of self-reported barriers to service were also identified. These findings have several policy implications and will be useful to service planners. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: Several questions for additional research were identified including the need to establish an inventory of service problem areas and investigating service and benefit policy and community awareness issues. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This paper provides policy makers with knowledge on the rural Aboriginal population, a population that has faced long standing problems in accessing appropriate health services.
PubMed ID
15974508 View in PubMed
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730 records – page 1 of 73.