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[Acute myelogenous leukemia. When the choice is between a good and a bad death]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26417
Source
Sykepleien. 1986 Jan 24;73(2):23-5, 29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1986

[Alcoholics--a heavy burden for health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233313
Source
Vardfacket. 1988 Mar 24;12(6):29-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-1988

Municipal resources and patient outcomes through the first year after a hip fracture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284732
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Feb 16;17(1):144
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2017
Author
Sabine Ruths
Valborg Baste
Marit Stordal Bakken
Lars Birger Engesæter
Stein Atle Lie
Siren Haugland
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Feb 16;17(1):144
Date
Feb-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Resources - supply & distribution - utilization
Hip Fractures - mortality - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient satisfaction
Quality of Life
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Hip fractures represent major critical events for older people, and put huge demands on economic and personnel resources. Most hip fracture patients are in need of postoperative rehabilitation services. Through the Coordination Reform, the municipalities in Norway were given increased responsibility for community-based treatment and rehabilitation after surgery. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between municipal resources and patient outcomes through the first year after a hip fracture, focusing on survival and health-related quality of life.
We conducted a nationwide cohort study on people experiencing a hip fracture in 2011-2012 in Norway, with a 1-year follow-up. We obtained data on date of hip fracture, demographics, total morbidity (ASA) score, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3 L), date of death if applicable, municipality of residence (Norwegian Hip Fracture Register), date of hospital readmission due to complications (Norwegian Patient Register), and information on municipalities' characteristics (Municipality-State-Reporting).
The study population comprised 15,757 patients, mean age 80.8 years, 68.6% women. All-cause mortality was 8.6% at 30 days, and 25.3% at 12 months. Mortality was lower in the municipalities with the highest overall staff time for rehabilitation. A high proportion of the population aged 80+, was associated with low rates of self-reported anxiety/depression 12 months after surgery, as well as higher general health scores (EQ-5D VAS). There were no other differences in outcome according to rehabilitation resources, when comparing municipalities with the highest and lowest staffing.
The study revealed no substantial impact of municipal resources on survival and health-related quality of life through the first year after a hip fracture. To evaluate major organizational changes and allocate resources according to best practice, there is a need to monitor health outcomes and use of resources over time through reliable measures, including variables related to coordination between services.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28209152 View in PubMed
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Technical efficiency in the use of health care resources: a comparison of OECD countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58231
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Jul;69(1):55-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Donna Retzlaff-Roberts
Cyril F Chang
Rose M Rubin
Author Affiliation
Management Science, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA.
Source
Health Policy. 2004 Jul;69(1):55-72
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Developed Countries - economics
Efficiency, Organizational - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - supply & distribution - utilization
Health Services Research - methods
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
International Agencies
Life expectancy
Models, Econometric
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
Our paper analyzes technical efficiency in the production of aggregate health outcomes of reduced infant mortality and increased life expectancy, using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) health data. Application of data envelopment analysis (DEA) reveals that some countries achieve relative efficiency advantages, including those with good health outcomes (Japan, Sweden, Norway, and Canada) and those with modest health outcomes (Mexico and Turkey). We conclude the USA may learn from countries more economical in their allocation of healthcare resources that more is not necessarily better. Specifically, we find that the USA can substantially reduce inputs while maintaining the current level of life expectancy.
PubMed ID
15484607 View in PubMed
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