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Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
W. Wong
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Aug;96(7):10-1
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic
Breast Feeding
Canada
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Organizational Policy
World Health Organization
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Oct;96(9):811865510
PubMed ID
11865518 View in PubMed
Less detail

AGREEing on Canadian cardiovascular clinical practice guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154833
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Oct;24(10):753-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
James A Stone
Leslie Austford
John H Parker
Norm Gledhill
Guy Tremblay
Heather M Arthur
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. jastone@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Oct;24(10):753-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - therapy
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Guideline Adherence
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Abstract
The use of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), particularly the routine implementation of evidence-based cardiovascular health maintenance and disease management recommendations, affords both expert and nonexpert practitioners the opportunity to achieve better, and at least theoretically similar, patient outcomes. However, health care practitioners are often stymied in their efforts to follow even well-researched and well-written CPGs as a consequence of contradictory information. The purposeful integration and harmonization of Canadian cardiovascular CPGs, regardless of their specific risk factor or clinical management focus, is critical to their widespread acceptance and implementation. This level of cooperation and coordination among CPG groups and organizations would help to ensure that their clinical practice roadmaps (ie, best practice recommendations) contain clear, concise and complementary, rather than contradictory, patient care information. Similarly, the application of specific tools intended to improve the quality of CPGs, such as the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) assessment tool, may also lead to improvements in CPG quality and potentially enhance their acceptance and implementation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18841253 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and drug use by students from western Canada in grades 6 through 12 (1992): have there been any changes over the past five years?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218256
Source
Int J Addict. 1994 May;29(7):829-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
K W Hindmarsh
S. Porter-Serviss
E E Opheim
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Int J Addict. 1994 May;29(7):829-35
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Attitude
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Promotion - standards
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Social Adjustment
Students
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Over 8,000 students in Grades 6 through 12, from Western Canada and the North West Territories were surveyed for the prevalence of licit and illicit drug use over a 1-year period ending June 30, 1992. The results were compared with three previous studies dating back to just over 5 years. While there was a slight decline between 1987 and 1990, the present study reveals a slight reverse in this trend. These results emphasize the need for continued education and perhaps the need for determining the reasons for use by this age group.
PubMed ID
8050830 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An accreditation process for public health. Is is possible? Is it desirable?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160449
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):422-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Martin Beaumont
Madeleine E Drew
Andre-Pierre Contandriopoulos
Author Affiliation
Conseil canadien d'agrément des services de santé, Développement des marchés nationaux et internationaux, candidat au doctorat en santé publique, Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal. martin.beaumont@cchsa-ccass.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):422-6
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - methods
Canada
Feasibility Studies
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Ontario
Population Surveillance
Public Health - standards
Public Health Administration - standards
Social Marketing
Abstract
The objective of this pan-Canadian study was to evaluate the feasibility of developing a set of accreditation standards supported by an accreditation process for public health in Canada.
Twenty-four telephone interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed and analyzed.
The scope of public health implied in respondents' answers included health protection, health promotion, disease prevention and surveillance. A large majority of the experts were in favour of implementing accreditation in public health. Of these, close to two thirds answered that public health needed its own standards to address some of the current gaps. People in health systems were faster to question the relevance of separate standards for public health to avoid creating artificial barriers within the continuum of care. Respondents who opposed an accreditation process for public health cited the lack of capacity currently in the system. Yet, proponents argued that accreditation could actually be used as a capacity-building tool and assist "to fight the tyranny of the urgent". Some identified the actual process of developing accreditation standards for public health as being a valuable exercise.
It appears that public health in Canada would benefit from an accreditation process developed in consultation with the field, to enhance visibility, capacity building, and performance through pan-Canadian standards which would also have to be flexible enough to accommodate specific provincial and local contexts.
PubMed ID
17985688 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Andrew Pattullo lecture. Health services managers or managers of health?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232046
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1988;6(1):71-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
M. Lalonde
Source
J Health Adm Educ. 1988;6(1):71-83
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Health Promotion - standards
Health status
Humans
Life Style
PubMed ID
10286460 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of breastfeeding promotion literature: does it really promote breastfeeding?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221961
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
R K Valaitis
E. Shea
Author Affiliation
McMaster University School of Nursing, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1993 Jan-Feb;84(1):24-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Breast Feeding
Canada
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Guidelines as Topic - standards
Health Education - standards
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Pamphlets
Reading
Teaching Materials - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Breastfeeding pamphlets are being produced for new mothers by both commercial and nonprofit sources in increasing quantities. A regional lactation committee decided to evaluate these materials on the basis of accuracy, degree of positive approach to breastfeeding, readability and compliance with the WHO/UNICEF Code on the Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes. Results indicate that materials produced by non-profit sources scored higher in positive approach accuracy and WHO Code compliance compared with commercial sources. Only 2 of 22 pamphlets in the sample were written within the recommended reading level of Grade 5-8. None of the materials met all of the criteria for good promotional breastfeeding literature.
PubMed ID
8500052 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian experience: why Canada decided against an upper limit for cholesterol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176684
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Dec;23(6 Suppl):616S-620S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Bruce E McDonald
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2. bmcdon@ms.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Am Coll Nutr. 2004 Dec;23(6 Suppl):616S-620S
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cholesterol, Dietary - administration & dosage
Consensus
Dietary Fats, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Nutrition Policy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Canada, like the United States, held a "consensus conference on cholesterol" in 1988. Although the final report of the consensus panel recommended that total dietary fat not exceed 30 percent and saturated fat not exceed 10 percent of total energy intake, it did not specify an upper limit for dietary cholesterol. Similarly, the 1990, Health Canada publication "Nutrition Recommendations: The Report of the Scientific Review Committee" specified upper limits for total and saturated fat in the diet but did not specify an upper limit for cholesterol. Canada's Guidelines for Healthy Eating, a companion publication from Health Canada, suggested that Canadians "choose low-fat dairy products, lean meats, and foods prepared with little or no fat" while enjoying "a variety of foods." Many factors contributed to this position but a primary element was the belief that total dietary fat and saturated fat were primary dietary determinants of serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, not dietary cholesterol. Hence, Canadian health authorities focused on reducing saturated fat and trans fats in the Canadian diet to help lower blood cholesterol levels rather than focusing on limiting dietary cholesterol. In an effort to allay consumer concern with the premise that blood cholesterol level is linked to dietary cholesterol, organizations such as the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency (CEMA) reminded health professionals, including registered dietitians, family physicians and nutrition educators, of the extensive data showing that there is little relationship between dietary cholesterol intake and cardiovascular mortality. In addition, it was pointed out that for most healthy individuals, endogenous synthesis of cholesterol by the liver adjusts to the level of dietary cholesterol intake. Educating health professionals about the relatively weak association between dietary cholesterol and the relatively strong association between serum cholesterol and saturated fat and trans fats helped keep consumers informed about healthy diets and ways to control blood cholesterol.
PubMed ID
15640515 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes since 1980 in body mass index and the prevalence of overweight among inschooling children in Nuuk, Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4730
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):157-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Christina Schnohr
Thorkild l Sørensen
Birgit Vollmer-Larsen Niclasen
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, The Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. christina@schnohr.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):157-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Arctic Regions
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child
Child Nutrition
Child Nutrition Disorders - prevention & control
Child Welfare - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - standards
Health status
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine the trends which have occurred during the past generation in body mass index (BMI) and in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among children in public schools in Nuuk, Greenland. STUDY DESIGN: The study is a retrospective cohort study of BMI among inschooling children (age 6 or 7 years old). A database was created on the basis of files from school-nurses containing information on height and weight among children having attended school in Nuuk since 1970. The database contained 10,121 measurements in total, whereas 2,801 were on inschooling children. Measurements from these children form the basis of this study. Mean and quartiles of BMI among the inschooling children in 5-year intervals were used to determine the development in BMI since 1980. On the basis of international cut-points for use among children and adolescents, the proportion of overweight and obese children and the trends since 1980 were determined. RESULTS: The mean BMI has risen by a total of a bit more than 6% since 1980, corresponding to a rise of 1.2-3.8% for every 5-year period. Increases are also observed when assessing the proportion of overweight and obese, which were 6.6% and 0.9%, respectively, among the inschooling children during the period 1980-1984. These proportions increased to 16.5% and 5.2%, respectively, in 2000-2004. CONCLUSION: This study has provided evidence that during the past two decades, children in Nuuk have undergone a development towards a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Apr;64(2):107-915945280
PubMed ID
15945285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Choosing indicators to evaluate Healthy Cities projects: a political task?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169869
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Jun;21(2):145-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Michel O'Neill
Paule Simard
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing and Groupe de recherche et d'intervention en promotion de la santé (GRIPSUL), Université Laval, Québec, Canada G1K 7P4. Michel.Oneill@fsi.ulaval.ca
Source
Health Promot Int. 2006 Jun;21(2):145-52
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Community Health Planning - standards
Health Care Rationing
Health Policy
Health Promotion - standards
Humans
Politics
Program Evaluation - methods
Quebec
Urban Health Services - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Ever since their beginning in 1986, Healthy Cities projects all over the world have been confronted with the issue of evaluation. However, after 20 years, many key dilemmas constantly reappear, people often looking for a kind of 'magic' list of universally applicable indicators to evaluate these initiatives. In this article we address five questions, allowing to illustrate the evaluative dilemmas the Healthy Communities movement is confronted with: Why evaluate Healthy Cities? What should be evaluated? Evaluate for who? Who should undertake the evaluation? How should the evaluation be performed? We conclude by formulating three recommendations in order to stimulate exchanges and debate. Our argument is based on a recent thorough analysis of the evaluative literature pertaining to the Healthy Cities movement, as well as on two decades of reflection on and involvement with this issue locally, nationally and internationally.
PubMed ID
16603569 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Community and institutional help: a spectrum for new parents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227149
Source
Nurs Que. 1991 Jan-Feb;11(1):41-6
Publication Type
Article

57 records – page 1 of 6.