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3-year impact of a provincial choking prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166017
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Nathalie Després
Annie Lapointe
Marie-Claude Quintal
Pierre Arcand
Chantal Giguère
Anthony Abela
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
J Otolaryngol. 2006 Aug;35(4):216-21
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Foreign Bodies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the impact of a provincial choking prevention program (CPP) on the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases among children.
The CPP, including posters, pamphlets, an informative video, and annual participation in the Parents & Kids Fair, was launched throughout Quebec in October 1999. The incidence rates of aerodigestive foreign body cases prior to implementation (during 1997-1998) and subsequently (2000-2002) within the province and our tertiary care centre (Sainte-Justine Hospital) were compared by estimating incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).
No significant changes in the incidence of aerodigestive foreign body cases after program implementation were observed in our hospital (age-adjusted IRR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.07). The provincial rates were higher after program implementation (age-adjusted IRR 1.15, 95% CI 1.05-1.25).
To influence choking prevention habits, modifications to the campaign are required. Strategies are discussed.
PubMed ID
17176795 View in PubMed
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12-month follow-up of an exploratory 'brief intervention' for high-frequency cannabis users among Canadian university students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124885
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Benedikt Fischer
Wayne Jones
Paul Shuper
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addictions, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 2400, 515 West Hastings St,, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, Canada. bfischer@sfu.ca
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2012;7:15
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Young Adult
Abstract
One in three young people use cannabis in Canada. Cannabis use can be associated with a variety of health problems which occur primarily among intensive/frequent users. Availability and effectiveness of conventional treatment for cannabis use is limited. While Brief Interventions (BIs) have been shown to result in short-term reductions of cannabis use risks or problems, few studies have assessed their longer-term effects. The present study examined 12-month follow-up outcomes for BIs in a cohort of young Canadian high-frequency cannabis users where select short-term effects (3 months) had previously been assessed and demonstrated.
N=134 frequent cannabis users were recruited from among university students in Toronto, randomized to either an oral or a written cannabis BI, or corresponding health controls, and assessed in-person at baseline, 3-months, and 12-months. N=72 (54%) of the original sample were retained for follow-up analyses at 12-months where reductions in 'deep inhalation/breathholding' (Q=13.1; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22538183 View in PubMed
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The 2005 British Columbia Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign and short-term changes in smoking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164149
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynda Gagné
Author Affiliation
School of Public Administration at University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. lgagne@uvic.ca
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2007 May-Jun;13(3):296-306
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Mass Media
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation
Public Health Administration - methods
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Social Marketing
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of the 2005 British Columbia Ministry of Health Smoking Cessation Mass Media Campaign on short-term smoking behavior.
National cross-sectional data are used with a quasi-experimental approach to test the impact of the campaign.
Findings indicate that prevalence and average number of cigarettes smoked per day deviated upward from trend for the rest of Canada (P = .08; P = .01) but not for British Columbia. They also indicate that British Columbia smokers in lower risk groups reduced their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend (-2.23; P = .10), whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did not, and that British Columbia smokers in high-risk groups did not increase their average daily consumption of cigarettes over and above the 1999-2004 trend, whereas smokers in the rest of Canada did (2.97; P = .01).
The overall poorer performance of high-risk groups is attributed to high exposure to cigarette smoking, which reduces a smoker's chances of successful cessation. In particular, high-risk groups are by definition more likely to be exposed to smoking by peers, but are also less likely to work in workplaces with smoking bans, which are shown to have a substantial impact on prevalence. Results suggest that for mass media campaigns to be more effective with high-risk groups, they need to be combined with other incentives, and that more prolonged interventions should be considered.
PubMed ID
17435497 View in PubMed
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2007 Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations: management of hypertension by nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162877
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(2):10-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Donna McLean
Kori Kingsbury
Jo-Anne Costello
Lyne Cloutier
Sandra Matheson
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2007;17(2):10-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Comorbidity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - nursing - prevention & control
Life Style
Patient compliance
Abstract
Recent data from the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that nearly one billion people in the world are suffering from hypertension. Forecasts suggest that, with the aging of the population, this number could reach 1.5 billion by 2025 (Kearney, Whelton, & Reynolds, 2005). In developed countries, more than one in five adults have hypertension (Vasan, Beiser, Seshadri, Larson, Kannel, & D'Agostino, 2002). Statistics for Canada reveal that fewer than 15% of those diagnosed with hypertension are adequately controlled (Joffres, Hamet, MacLean, L'italien, & Fodor, 2001). Part of the effort to improve hypertension detection, assessment and treatment is an annual process to produce and update evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension and to implement the recommendations (Zarnke, Campbell, McAlister, & Levine, 2000; Campbell, Nagpal, & Drouin, 2001). The most up-to-date 2007 Canadian recommendations for the assessment and management of hypertension are presented. Contemporary nursing practice requires that nurses take responsibility and a role in the primary prevention, detection and treatment of hypertension.
PubMed ID
17583316 View in PubMed
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The Ability of Posters to Enhance the Comfort Level with Breastfeeding in a Public Venue in Rural Newfoundland and Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279830
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Alissa Vieth
Janine Woodrow
Janet Murphy-Goodridge
Courtney O'Neil
Barbara Roebothan
Source
J Hum Lact. 2016 Feb;32(1):174-81
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Audiovisual Aids
Breast Feeding - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptance and support of breastfeeding in public venues can influence breastfeeding practices and, ultimately, the health of the population.
The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether posters targeted at the general public could improve acceptability of breastfeeding in public places.
A convenience sample of 255 participants was surveyed at shopping centers in 2 rural communities of Newfoundland and Labrador. Experimentally, questions were posed to 117 participants pre- and post-exposure to 2 specific posters designed to promote public acceptance of breastfeeding in public.
Initially, we surveyed that only 51.9% of participants indicated that they were comfortable with a woman breastfeeding anywhere in public. However, context played a role, whereby a doctor's office (84.5%) or park (81.4%) were the most acceptable public places for breastfeeding, but least acceptable was a business office environment (66.7%). Of participants, 35.4% indicated previously viewing specific posters. We used a visual analog scale to test poster viewing on the acceptability of public breastfeeding in the context of a doctor's office and a restaurant. Results of pre- versus post-viewing of the promotional posters indicated significant improvements in both scenarios: in a doctor's office (P = .035) and in a restaurant (P = .021).
Nearly 50% of the surveyed population indicated discomfort with a mother breastfeeding in public. Both cross-sectional and interventional evidence showed that posters significantly improved the reported level of comfort toward seeing breastfeeding in public.
PubMed ID
26151965 View in PubMed
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[A campaign against home accidents--accident prevention efforts in the communities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228180
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-1990
Author
F. Thuen
K I Klepp
R. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalforeningens HEMIL-senter, Universitetet i Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Oct 30;110(26):3387-90
Date
Oct-30-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Norway
Primary prevention - methods
Abstract
A nation-wide campaign aimed at preventing accidents in the home is being implemented in Norway. 95% of the municipalities acknowledge having received information material from the campaign, 33% report having established accident prevention committees, and 26% report having introduced preventive measures as a result of this national campaign. The study indicates that accidents are not recognized as yet as a major health problem in many municipalities. Identification of accidents as a health problem seems to be an important factor in the preventive efforts. To enhance further accident prevention efforts it seems important to increase awareness of accident as a health problem, and to increase the involvement of key personnel within the community.
PubMed ID
2256065 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of reminder letters for Papanicolaou tests: a survey of women from 23 Family Health Networks in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160995
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Oct;29(10):829-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tina Karwalajtys
Janusz Kaczorowski
Lynne Lohfeld
Stephanie Laryea
Kelly Anderson
Stefanie Roder
Rolf J Sebaldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Oct;29(10):829-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Papanicolaou test
Patient compliance
Reminder Systems
Vaginal Smears
Women's health
Abstract
To explore women's perspectives on the acceptability and content of reminder letters from the family physician for Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening and the effect of reminder letters on compliance with screening recommendations.
A population-based survey was conducted in 23 Family Health Networks and Primary Care Networks participating in a demonstration project to increase the delivery of preventive services in Ontario. Questionnaires were mailed to randomly selected women aged 35 to 69 years who had received a reminder letter for a Pap test from their family physician within the previous six months. Two focus groups were conducted with a volunteer sample of respondents.
The usable response rate was 54.3% (406/748). Two-thirds (65.8%, 267/406) of women who completed the survey recalled receiving the reminder letter. Overall, 52.3% (212/405) reported having a Pap test in the past six months. Among women who recalled the reminder letter and scheduled or had a Pap test, 71.4% (125/175) reported that the letter influenced their decision to be screened. The majority of respondents (80.8%, 328/406) wanted to continue to receive reminder letters for Pap tests from their physician, and 34.5% (140/406) wanted to receive additional information about cervical screening. Focus group interviews indicated that women who have had a Pap test may still be unsure about screening recommendations, what the test detects, and the rationale for follow-up procedures.
Reminder letters in family practice were viewed as useful and influenced women's decisions to undergo Pap test screening. Women who have had a Pap test may still need additional information about the test.
PubMed ID
17915066 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292610
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Author Affiliation
1 Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
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Access to health and social services for IDU: the impact of a medically supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149722
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Will Small
Natasha Van Borek
Nadia Fairbairn
Evan Wood
Thomas Kerr
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 Jul;28(4):341-6
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Data Collection
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needle-Exchange Programs - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injection drug users (IDU) often experience barriers to conventional health-care services, and consequently might rely on acute and emergency services. This study sought to investigate IDU perspectives regarding the impact of supervised injection facility (SIF) use on access to health-care services.
Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 50 Vancouver-based IDU participating in the Scientific Evaluation of Supervised Injecting cohort. Audio-recorded interviews elicited IDU perspectives regarding the impact of SIF use on access to health and social services. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted.
Fifty IDU, including 21 women, participated in this study. IDU narratives indicate that the SIF serves to facilitate access to health care by providing much-needed care on-site and connects IDU to external services through referrals. Participants' perspectives suggest that the SIF has facilitated increased uptake of health and social services among IDU.
Although challenges related to access to care remain in many settings, SIF have potential to promote health by facilitating enhanced access to health-care and social services through a model of care that is accessible to high-risk IDU.
PubMed ID
19594786 View in PubMed
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Acculturation stress among Maya in the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121282
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eugenia Millender
Author Affiliation
Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA. emillend@fau.edu
Source
J Cult Divers. 2012;19(2):58-64
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Diversity
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Mexico - ethnology
Nursing Research
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Abstract: As health care disparities become more evident in our multicultural nation, culture sensitive health research needs to be a priority in order for good health care to take place. This article will explore the literature related to acculturation stress and mental health disparities among the Mayan population. Literatures of similar but distinct groups are included due to the limited amount of research of the Mayan population. Using Leiniger's Transcultural nursing theory, these findings suggest that nurses have a large gap to fill to address the mental health disparities of specific cultural groups like the indigenous Maya, thereby satisfying their nursing obligations.
PubMed ID
22924204 View in PubMed
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803 records – page 1 of 81.