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Bicycle helmet promotion. Prototype for physician activism in injury prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218093
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1074-5, 1080-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
R. Cushman
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1074-5, 1080-1
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bicycling - injuries
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Consumer Participation
Head Protective Devices
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Physician's Role
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Notes
Cites: Pediatr Clin North Am. 1985 Feb;32(1):141-513975084
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1989 May 25;320(21):1361-72716781
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Oct 27;262(16):2256-612795807
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 May 1;146(9):1581-51571869
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Oct;40:1703-47950463
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1116-248019188
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1126-318019189
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 1994 Jun;40:1132-78019190
PubMed ID
8019179 View in PubMed
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Changes among retailers selling cigarettes to minors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213191
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jan-Feb;87(1):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
R A Dovell
D L Mowat
J. Dorland
M. Lam
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, Vancouver, BC. rdovell@unixg.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jan-Feb;87(1):66-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Female
Health Education - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Social Control, Formal
Abstract
This study analyzes changes over a three-year period among Ontario retailers selling cigarettes to minors. Under supervision, 13 and 14-year-old minors were sent into stores to attempt to buy cigarettes. These minor-purchase-events (MPEs) were carried out in a local health unit that had implemented a community-based intervention and in an adjoining comparison health unit. After the local program we observed a large reduction (from 46% to 6%) in merchants willing to sell tobacco to minors. In the neighbouring health unit, a high rate of selling continued until a federal program using a similar intervention was implemented, after which a large reduction (from 47% to 2%) was observed. This magnitude of change has been unprecedented, except when active enforcement was implemented by police officers. Thus, from a public health perspective, it is important to understand what is influencing the store operators.
PubMed ID
8991749 View in PubMed
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[Comprehensive continuous sanitary education and training of the population under present conditions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183945
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):67-9
Publication Type
Article
Source
Promot Educ. 1995 Jun-Sep;2(2-3):82-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M. Christie
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Board of Health.
Source
Promot Educ. 1995 Jun-Sep;2(2-3):82-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forecasting
Health Policy
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Norway
Organizational Objectives
PubMed ID
7582759 View in PubMed
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Curbing the obesity epidemic: the need for policy action in a risk-balanced, orchestrated, comprehensive strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153461
Source
Int J Public Health. 2008;53(6):320-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Development of a Swedish bicycle helmet promotion programme--one decade of experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61404
Source
Health Promot Int. 2002 Jun;17(2):161-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Leif Svanström
Glenn Welander
Robert Ekman
Lothar Schelp
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden. leif.svanstrom@phs.ki.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2002 Jun;17(2):161-9
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bicycling
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Head Protective Devices - utilization
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Program Development
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: to describe 10 years of experiences of the Swedish National Bicycle Safety Programme which started during 1990 as part of an initiative taken by the World Health Organization (WHO). In relation to WHO's efforts with regard to accident and injury prevention, a global programme to increase helmet-wearing by two-wheel riders was launched. The idea was to introduce a simple 'vaccine' for everyone that was achievable at a low cost. The Swedish initiative was taken up by the Karolinska Institute and the National Institute of Public Health. METHOD: at an operational level, all available methods and data sources were utilized in the programme: surveillance of injuries, provision of information and advice, training and supervision, environment and product improvements, and legislation. RESULTS: considerable progress has been made in reducing bicycle-related injuries in Sweden over the last two decades. Cycling injuries among the elderly must be a matter of particular concern. CONCLUSIONS: our 10 years of experiences from a bicycle helmet promotion programme lead to the conclusion that there is a case for mandatory helmet wearing, as one of the most important strategies on the national level. But regional and community-based efforts will still need to be more comprehensive. Besides this, efforts must be made to intensify the activities of parties already involved in prevention programmes. New target groups must be approached, such as immigrants, vulnerable social groups, and teenagers. Sustainability of the Swedish Bicycle Helmet Initiative Group, including continued participation of group members and organizations, is the key--in the long term--to protecting Swedish bicyclists against head injuries.
PubMed ID
11986297 View in PubMed
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The effectiveness of tobacco sales ban to minors: the case of Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179863
Source
Tob Control. 2004 Jun;13(2):167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
A H Rimpelä
S U Rainio
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland.
Source
Tob Control. 2004 Jun;13(2):167-74
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Finland
Health Promotion - legislation & jurisprudence
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Minors - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
School Health Services
Smoking - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of the 1977 and 1995 tobacco sales bans on tobacco acquisition of minors.
Biennial nationwide postal surveys (adolescent health and lifestyle survey, AHLS) in 1977-2003; annual classroom surveys (school health promotion survey, SHPS) in 1996-2003.
Entire Finland-12, 14, 16, and 18 year olds (AHLS, n = 80 282); eighth and ninth graders (14-16 year olds) (SHPS, n = 226 681).
Purchase of tobacco from commercial sources during the past month, purchase from different commercial (shop, kiosk, other outlet) and social sources, ease of buying tobacco, overall acquisition of tobacco products, daily smoking, tobacco experimenting.
Decrease in tobacco purchase from commercial sources was small and short term after 1977 but large and permanent after 1995: purchase rate among 14 year old smokers diminished from 90% to 67% in 2003, 16 year olds from 94% to 62%. Purchases in shops decreased most (14 year olds: from 39% to 14%; 16 year olds: from 76% to 27%); purchases in kiosks less. An increase was observed in obtaining tobacco from other outlets and friends (social sources). Only 2-3% of 14-16 year old smokers used commercial sources exclusively when obtaining tobacco. Daily smoking began to decrease after 2001, following an earlier decrease in those experimenting. No changes were observed among age groups not targeted by the ban.
Legislation appears to have permanently changed tobacco sales practices and decreased purchases from commercial sources. Social sources need to be taken into account when controlling access to tobacco. Sales bans should be accompanied by other health promotion measures.
Notes
Cites: Tob Control. 2000 Jun;9(2):169-7610841853
Cites: Tob Control. 1999 Summer;8(2):152-510478398
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Dec;10(4):323-811740022
Cites: Tob Control. 2002 Mar;11(1):3-611891349
Cites: Tob Control. 2002 Mar;11(1):20-511891364
Cites: Pediatrics. 2002 Jun;109(6):1088-9212042547
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Cites: JAMA. 1989 Jan 6;261(1):80-32908999
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Jul;81(7):891-32053666
Cites: JAMA. 1991 Dec 11;266(22):3159-611956104
Cites: Prev Med. 1992 May;21(3):320-81614994
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1996 Jan-Feb;87(1):66-88991749
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Apr;87(4):649-519146446
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1997 May-Jun;13(3):167-749181203
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1998 Jun;88(6):932-69618623
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Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1999 Mar;48(6):759-7510190639
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 1999 Apr;27(2):143-6010425697
Cites: Prev Med. 2000 Jul;31(1):39-4810896842
PubMed ID
15175535 View in PubMed
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53 records – page 1 of 6.