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[Accelerating development of bariatric surgery in Sweden].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125605
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Dec 7-13;108(49):2574-7
Publication Type
Article

Access to health care in the Scandinavian countries: ethical aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32832
Source
Health Care Anal. 1999;7(4):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
S. Holm
P E Liss
O F Norheim
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Ethics and Policy, University of Manchester.
Source
Health Care Anal. 1999;7(4):321-30
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Ethics, Medical
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Primary Health Care
Scandinavia
Abstract
The health care systems are fairly similar in the Scandinavian countries. The exact details vary, but in all three countries the system is almost exclusively publicly funded through taxation, and most (or all) hospitals are also publicly owned and managed. The countries also have a fairly strong primary care sector (even though it varies between the countries), with family physicians to various degrees acting as gatekeepers to specialist services. In Denmark most of the GP services are free. For the patient in Norway and Sweden there are out-of-pocket co-payments for GP consultations, with upper limits, but consultations for children are free. Hospital treatment is free in Denmark while the other countries use a system with out-of-pocket co-payment. There is a very strong public commitment to access to high quality health care for all. Solidarity and equality form the ideological basis for the Scandinavian welfare state. Means testing, for instance, has been widely rejected in the Scandinavian countries on the grounds that public services should not stigmatise any particular group. Solidarity also means devoting special consideration to the needs of those who have less chance than others of making their voices heard or exercising their rights. Issues of limited access are now, however, challenging the thinking about a health care system based on solidarity.
PubMed ID
10787795 View in PubMed
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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1982 Feb 3;82(5):7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-1982

Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173511
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
L Miin Alikhan
Guillermo A Sandoval
Neil Seeman
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Economic Competition
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Hospital Planning - economics - trends
Humans
National Health Programs - trends
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required.
PubMed ID
16078398 View in PubMed
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Addressing the epidemiologic transition in the former Soviet Union: strategies for health system and public health reform in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212589
Source
Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):313-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
T H Tulchinsky
E A Varavikova
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health Hadassah-Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):313-20
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Priorities
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Longevity
Morbidity - trends
Mortality - trends
Public Health Administration
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reviews Russia's health crisis, financing, and organization and public health reform needs.
The structure, policy, supply of services, and health status indicators of Russia's health system are examined.
Longevity is declining; mortality rates from cardiovascular diseases and trauma are high and rising; maternal and infant mortality are high. Vaccine-preventable diseases have reappeared in epidemic form. Nutrition status is problematic.
The crisis relates to Russia's economic transition, but it also goes deep into the former Soviet health system. The epidemiologic transition from a predominance of infectious to noninfectious diseases was addressed by increasing the quantity of services. The health system lacked mechanisms for epidemiologic or economic analysis and accountability to the public. Policy and funding favored hospitals over ambulatory care and individual routine checkups over community-oriented preventive approaches. Reform since 1991 has centered on national health insurance and decentralized management of services. A national health strategy to address fundamental public health problems is recommended.
Notes
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1984;37(4):364-746441355
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Feb;80(2):193-72297064
Cites: Ann Med. 1990;22(4):211-22248754
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(8):867-772259961
Cites: BMJ. 1991 Jan 19;302(6769):170-11995141
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 1991;21(3):493-5041917209
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1991 Fall;10(3):202-151748378
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1991 Fall;10(3):22-381748380
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1991 Fall;10(3):71-861748393
Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 1991 Nov-Dec;22(6):368-771792676
Cites: Health Policy. 1991 Sep;19(1):45-5410117391
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(1):15-281413854
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(1):29-491413855
Cites: World Health Stat Q. 1992;45(1):68-741413859
Cites: J Health Adm Educ. 1994 Fall;12(4):485-51710137980
Cites: JAMA. 1995 May 24-31;273(20):1569-737745761
Comment In: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):321-38604755
PubMed ID
8604754 View in PubMed
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Addressing the non-medical determinants of health: a survey of Canada's health regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165318
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
C James Frankish
Glen E Moulton
Darryl Quantz
Arlene J Carson
Ann L Casebeer
John D Eyles
Ronald Labonte
Brian E Evoy
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Promotion Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Frankish@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Jan-Feb;98(1):41-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sociology, Medical
Urban health
Abstract
The Canadian health system is undergoing reform. Over the past decade a prominent trend has been creation of health regions. This structural shift is concurrent with a greater emphasis on population health and the broad determinants of health. In parallel, there is a movement toward more intersectoral collaboration (i.e., collaboration between diverse segments of the health system, and between the health system and other sectors of society). The purpose of this exploratory study is to determine the self-reported level of internal action (within regional health authorities) and intersectoral collaboration around 10 determinants of health by regional health authorities across Canada.
From September 2003 to February 2004, we undertook a survey of regional health authorities in Canadian provinces (N = 69). Using SPSS 12.0, we generated frequencies for the self-reported level of internal and intersectoral action for each determinant. Other analyses were done to compare rural/suburban and urban regions, and to compare Western, Central and Eastern Canada.
Of the 10 determinants of health surveyed, child development and personal health practices were self-reported by the majority of health regions to receive greatest attention, both internally and through intersectoral activities. Culture, gender and employment/working conditions received least attention in most regions.
The exploratory survey results give us the first Canadian snapshot of health regions' activities in relation to the broad range of non-medical determinants of health. They provide a starting data set for baselining future progress, and for beginning deeper analyses of specific areas of action and intersectoral collaboration.
PubMed ID
17278677 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170442
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):17-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Alan Davidson
Author Affiliation
UBC-Okanagan, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2005;18(4):17-21
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Priorities
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Models, organizational
Organizational Objectives
Public Health
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Using the case of the B.C. Interior Health Authority, the paper teases out some of the bases for practical success and failure in advancing population health in a regionalized health system.
PubMed ID
16509277 View in PubMed
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Agreement between referral information and discharge diagnoses according to Norwegian elective treatment guidelines - a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264629
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:493
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Lise Lund Håheim
Jon Helgeland
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2014;14:493
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis, Differential
Efficiency, Organizational
Female
Guideline Adherence
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research
Hospitals - standards
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Abstract
Norway introduced 32 priority guidelines for elective health treatment in the specialist health service in the period 2008-9. The guidelines were intended to reduce large differences in waiting times among hospitals, streamline referrals and ensure that patients accessed the necessary healthcare to which they were entitled for certain conditions. Referral information guided the priorities. As the referral information was key to future evaluation of the guidelines, this study validates the referral information in hospital patient records against discharge diagnoses, because only the discharge diagnosis is recorded in the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) database, which is used in the main evaluation.
Of the specific conditions from 10 priority guidelines, 20 were selected for review for the period 2008-9 at 4 hospitals in Norway. The ICD-10 diagnoses per disease or condition were given in retrospect by clinicians who participated in the expert groups developing the priority guidelines. Reasons for deviations between referral information and discharge diagnoses were coded into four categories, according to the degree of precision of the former compared with the latter.
In all, 1854 medical records were available for review. The diagnostic precision of the referrals differed significantly between hospitals, and across the 2 years 2008 and 2009. The overall sensitivity was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.92-0.94). For the separate conditions, sensitivity was in the range 0.60-1.00. Experience showed that it was necessary to pay careful attention to the selection of ICD-10 diagnoses for identifying patients. The medical records of psychiatry patients were unavailable in some cases and for certain conditions some were unavailable after use of our record extraction algorithm.
The sensitivity of the referral information on diagnosis or condition was high compared with the discharge diagnosis for the 20 selected conditions from the 10 priority guidelines. Although the review assessed a limited number of the total, we consider the results sufficiently representative and, hence, they will allow use of the NPR data for analyses of the introduction and follow-up of the 32 priority guidelines.
Notes
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2013 Aug;92(8):943-5023621424
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Apr;25(2):435-429119571
Cites: Stroke. 1999 Jan;30(1):56-609880388
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Feb;43(2):182-815655432
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Mar;58(3):280-515718117
Cites: BMJ. 2013;346:f235023692896
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol. 2012 Oct;36(5):425-922727737
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13:3723398861
Cites: Can Respir J. 2005 Jul-Aug;12(5):251-616107913
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2005 Dec;76(6):823-816470436
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar;26(3):221-821170572
Cites: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Jun;46(3):149-5322397620
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2012 Aug;40(6):505-1522899561
PubMed ID
25359085 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1993 Mar 1;148(5):802-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1993
Author
M T Schechter
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia.
Source
CMAJ. 1993 Mar 1;148(5):802-5
Date
Mar-1-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - economics - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control - transmission
Attitude to Health
Canada - epidemiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disease Outbreaks
HIV
Health Priorities
Health Resources
Humans
Incidence
Research Support as Topic
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 Apr 15;138(8):736-413355954
Cites: Science. 1988 Jul 29;241(4865):514, 5173399880
Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 Aug 1;149(3):265, 268; author reply 268-98339169
Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 Mar 1;148(5):745-98439932
Comment In: CMAJ. 1993 Aug 1;149(3):265; author reply 268-98339168
PubMed ID
8439940 View in PubMed
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The Alaskan opportunity to plan and develop health care resources and to promote improved health status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244360
Source
Alaska Med. 1981 Jul-Aug;23(4):49-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
R. Hammett
Source
Alaska Med. 1981 Jul-Aug;23(4):49-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Delivery of Health Care
Health Priorities
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
PubMed ID
7283102 View in PubMed
Less detail

657 records – page 1 of 66.