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164 records – page 1 of 17.

[About health care profit: USA is not a model!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161515
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Publication Type
Article
Author
Bror Gårdelöf
Author Affiliation
Bror.Gardelov@lio.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Aug 8-21;104(32-33):2263
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Health Policy - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Private Sector
Sweden
United States
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2007 Jul 11-24;104(28-29):2091-217702384
PubMed ID
17822208 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity-based financing in psychiatry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177364
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 18;124(22):2943-4; author reply 2944
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-2004
Author
Jon Lekven
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 18;124(22):2943-4; author reply 2944
Date
Nov-18-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Financing, Government
Health Policy - economics
Hospitals, Psychiatric - economics
Humans
Mental Health Services - economics
Norway
Psychiatry - economics
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 23;124(18):2379-8115467806
PubMed ID
15550979 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity-based financing in psychiatry, too?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178070
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 23;124(18):2379-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2004
Author
Anne Line Bretteville-Jensen
Oddvar Kaarbøe
Author Affiliation
Program for helseøkonomi i Bergen (HEB) og Statens institutt for rusmiddelforskning (SIRUS), Postboks 565 Sentrum, 0105 Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Sep 23;124(18):2379-81
Date
Sep-23-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Efficiency, Organizational - economics
Financing, Government
Health Policy - economics
Hospitals, Psychiatric - economics
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics
Mental Health Services - economics
Norway
Psychiatry - economics
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Nov 18;124(22):2943-4; author reply 294415550979
PubMed ID
15467806 View in PubMed
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[A gap in the welfare. Every other low-income earner skips visits to the dentist--a public health problem is to be expected]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75749
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Björn Klinge
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. Bjorn.Klinge@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Mar 8-14;103(10):738-9
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Dental Prophylaxis - economics
Health Policy - economics
Humans
Income
Oral Health
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
16610199 View in PubMed
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Alcohol in Greenland 1951-2010: consumption, mortality, prices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117897
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Hans Aage
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Science, Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark. hansaa@ruc.dk
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics - ethnology - trends
Alcohol-Related Disorders - economics - ethnology - mortality
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects - economics
Commerce - economics - trends
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health Policy - economics - trends
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Taxes - economics - trends
Abstract
Fluctuations in alcohol consumption in Greenland have been extreme since alcohol became available to the Greenland Inuit in the 1950s, increasing from low levels in the 1950s to very high levels in the 1980s - about twice as high as alcohol consumption in Denmark. Since then, consumption has declined, and current consumption is slightly below alcohol consumption in Denmark, while alcohol prices are far above Danish prices.
Description of historical trends and possible causal connections of alcohol prices, alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality in Greenland 1951-2010 as a background for the evaluation of the impact of various types of policy.
Time series for Greenland 1951-2010 for alcohol prices, consumption and mortality are compiled, and variation and correlations are discussed in relation to various policies aimed at limiting alcohol consumption. Corresponding time series for Denmark 1906-2010 are presented for comparison.
The trends in alcohol prices and consumption followed each other rather closely until the 1990s in Greenland and the 1980s in Denmark. At this time, consumption stabilised while prices decreased further, but the effect of prices upon consumption is strong, also in recent years. A trend in Greenlandic mortality similar to consumption is discernible, but not significant. Among alcohol-related deaths cirrhosis of the liver is less prevalent whilst accidents are more prevalent than in Denmark.
The effect of alcohol excise taxes and rationing upon consumption is evident. The stabilisation and subsequent decline in consumption since the mid-1990s, while alcohol prices decreased persistently, does not preclude continued effects of prices. On the contrary, price effects have been neutralised by other stronger causes. Whether these are government anti-alcohol campaigns or a cultural change is not clear.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2008 Sep;67(4):299-30719024800
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Jun;64(3):234-4516050317
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:410-315736695
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Jun;65(3):219-2716871828
PubMed ID
23256091 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological approach towards measuring the trade-off between equity and efficiency in health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212666
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
L. Lindholm
M. Rosén
M. Emmelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research - methods
Health status
Humans
Models, Economic
Pilot Projects
Politics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Social Class
Social Justice - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
The concept of social welfare functions has been discussed in health economic literature, as it provides a way of examining the extent to which society is prepared to accept a trade-off between efficiency and equity. In this paper requirements for meaningful empirical estimates of the willingness to accept lower per capita health status in order to achieve greater equity are examined. Results from a pilot study aimed at testing the proposed measurement procedure are reported. They show that at least two thirds of the politicians who participated are prepared to accept a lower growth in per capita health in exchange for increased equity. Accordingly, we found a weak empirical support for the common health economic assumption that only total health benefit should guide the use of resources.
PubMed ID
10157398 View in PubMed
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An outcomes-based approach to decisions about drug coverage policies in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177508
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2004 Nov;55(11):1230-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004

Application of a case-mix classification based on the functional autonomy of the residents for funding long-term care facilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186950
Source
Age Ageing. 2003 Jan;32(1):60-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Michel Tousignant
Réjean Hébert
Nicole Dubuc
France Simoneau
Linda Dieleman
Author Affiliation
Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke Geriatric University Institute, Quebec, Canada. michel.tousignant@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Age Ageing. 2003 Jan;32(1):60-6
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - classification
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Budgets - statistics & numerical data
Chronic Disease - classification - economics
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification - economics
Female
Financing, Government - economics
Health Policy - economics
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Homes for the Aged - economics
Humans
Long-Term Care - economics
Male
National Health Programs - economics
Quebec
Abstract
increasing public costs for the care of the elderly have created fundamental changes that are redefining the basic principles of health care funding. In the past, overall institutional funding was predominantly tied to spending. In view of the limitations of this approach to funding long-term care facilities, case-mix classification tries to take into account the characteristics of the residents as a tool for predicting costs. Recently, a new case-mix classification based on the functional autonomy profile of the residents - ISO-SMAF profile - was developed in the Province of Quebec, Canada. This classification can be used to change the funding system to base it on the functional autonomy characteristics of the residents.
the main objective of this study was to apply the ISO-SMAF classification to funding long-term care facilities in one area of the Province of Quebec and to compare the results of this new funding methodology to the formal methodology.
this study used a cross-sectional design.
the population under study comprised all residents of all 11 long-term care facilities in the Eastern Townships area of Quebec. Each resident was assessed using the Functional Autonomy Measurement System. The theoretical budget was calculated based on the adjusted cost per year associated with each ISO-SMAF profile derived from a previous economic study.
the theoretical budget based on the ISO-SMAF profiles may highlight the under- or over-funding of a facility when compared to the usual funding system based predominantly on the number of beds and hours of care.
the results of this study show the feasibility of applying the new funding approach to long-term care facilities. However, implementation of the ISO-SMAF classification for funding must be supported by continued and computerised residents' medical files including the Functional Autonomy Measurement System.
PubMed ID
12540350 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A questionnaire about compulsory referrals in Stockholm].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177409
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Oct 21;101(43):3371
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2004

164 records – page 1 of 17.