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200 records – page 1 of 20.

Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2012
Author
Steinar Krokstad
Author Affiliation
HUNT forskningssenter, Institutt for samfunnsmedisin, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Norway. steinak@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Oct 16;132(19):2186-8
Date
Oct-16-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Care Reform
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Preventive Medicine
Public Health
PubMed ID
23076491 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: Four Nordic public health policies

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101197
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Vallgårda, S
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Health Policy
Health promotion
Liberalism
Nordic countries
Public Health
Responsibility
Social Conditions
Social democracy
Abstract
AIMS: To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy. METHODS: Analyses of recent public health programs in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. RESULTS: Focus is on either, or both, individual behavior and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programs is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish program is the most liberal focusing on behaviors and individual's choices; the Norwegian program is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programs lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population. CONCLUSIONS: No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programs contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behavior versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
Less detail

Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: four Nordic public health policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136211
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 Suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Signild Vallgårda
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark. s.vallgarda@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 Suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Politics
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy.
Analyses of recent public health programmes in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden.
Focus is on either, or both, individual behaviour and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programmes is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish programme is the most liberal focusing on behaviours and individual's choices; the Norwegian programme is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programmes lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population.
No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programmes contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behaviour versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
PubMed ID
21382843 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A decrease in harm: a new concept for Russian public health].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202611
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):107-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Burrows
Iu Sarankov
Author Affiliation
Médecins Sans Frontières, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Jan-Feb;(1):107-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
HIV Infections - prevention & control
HIV-1
Health Policy
Humans
Opioid-Related Disorders - prevention & control
Public Health
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - prevention & control
Abstract
The main principles of the concept of the "decrease of harm", realized in many countries of the world, are presented and the expediency of using this concept in Russia is substantiated. The beginning of the realization of the Project "Decrease of Harm: the Russian Federation", aimed at training specialists capable of carrying out prophylactic work among users of intravenous drugs (UID), is demonstrated. The principles of the selection of the groups of trainees are shown: the groups are made up of physicians working at AIDS centres, specialists in narcology and representatives of non-governmental organizations. The course of training provides the basic information on the strategy of the prophylaxis of HIV infection among UID, including evaluation and study, outreach, change of syringes and needles, replacement therapy, the program of the treatment of drug addiction. At the present moment 46 specialists from 18 regions of Russia are taking the course of training.
PubMed ID
10096229 View in PubMed
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Advancing the population health agenda: uniting altruism and self-interest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199426
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S66-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S J Lewis
Author Affiliation
Access Consulting Ltd., Saskatoon. sj.lewis@home.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90 Suppl 1:S66-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Health Policy
Humans
Public Health
PubMed ID
10686766 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol in Canada: reducing the toll through focused interventions and public health policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136996
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Mar 8;183(4):450-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-2011
Author
Norman Giesbrecht
Timothy Stockwell
Perry Kendall
Robert Strang
Gerald Thomas
Author Affiliation
Social and Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ont. norman_giesbrecht@camh.net
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Mar 8;183(4):450-5
Date
Mar-8-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Public Health
Risk factors
Notes
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 May;68(3):345-5217446973
Cites: Addiction. 2007 Sep;102(9):1345-917645431
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Feb;104(2):179-9019149811
Cites: Drug Alcohol Rev. 2009 May;28(3):301-2319489992
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2223-3319560604
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Oct 8;59(39):1274-920930706
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2247-5719560606
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 Sep-Oct;44(5):500-1619734159
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Nov;104(11):1827-3619681801
Cites: Addiction. 2009 Dec;104(12):2023-3219922569
Cites: Addiction. 2010 Aug;105(8):1323-520653610
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jun 27;373(9682):2234-4619560605
PubMed ID
21324848 View in PubMed
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Alcohol policy in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11065
Source
BMJ. 1997 Apr 19;314(7088):1142-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-1997
Author
L. Chenet
M. McKee
M. Osler
A. Krasnik
Source
BMJ. 1997 Apr 19;314(7088):1142-3
Date
Apr-19-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence
Commerce
Health Policy
Humans
Public Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Scandinavia
Notes
Comment On: BMJ. 1997 Apr 19;314(7088):1164-89146389
PubMed ID
9146376 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol-related policy measures in Ontario: who supports what and to what degree?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195320
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Anglin
L. Kavanagh
N. Giesbrecht
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Addiction Research Foundation Site, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2S1. lise_anglin@camh.net
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Educational Status
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Ontario
Policy Making
Public Health
Public Opinion
Abstract
Using 1998 provincial survey data (n = 1,205), the authors examine responses to 7 items concerning public opinion on alcohol-related policy in Ontario. The purpose of the study is to get a sense of overall public opinion on certain topical policy-related measures and to see whether this opinion is predicted by demographic characteristics of respondents (sex, age and self-reported drinking pattern). Cross-tabulations of opinion items with demographic variables revealed strong majority support for the status quo with regard to number of liquor and beer stores, beer and liquor store hours, and prohibition of the sale of alcohol in corner stores. A somewhat less robust majority also supported the status quo for alcohol taxes and legal drinking age. Among the demographic groups, high-risk heavy drinkers stood out for their greater support of relaxation of controls and this finding was confirmed by means of logistic regression. The majority of all groups, except frequent bar-goers, liked the idea of warning labels on alcoholic beverage containers. The authors conclude that, according to these survey data, policy initiatives towards greater access to alcohol, such as extended liquor store hours and sale of alcohol in corner stores, are not mandated by the majority of the population of Ontario.
PubMed ID
11257985 View in PubMed
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"A magnet for curious adolescents": the perceived dangers of an open drug scene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93377
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Sandberg Sveinung
Pedersen Willy
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Bergen, Rosenbergsgaten 39, 5015 Bergen, Norway. sveinung.sandberg@sos.uib.no
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Dec;19(6):459-66
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Behavior, Addictive
Drug and Narcotic Control
Government Regulation
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Public Health
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Social Distance
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
During the summer of 2004 the police closed Plata, an open drug scene in the midst of Oslo. The most important argument for the closure was that the drug scene made it easier for curious, city-dwelling adolescents to start using drugs. This research sought to assess this assumption. Ethnographic research methods including twenty 2-hr field observations and qualitative semi-structures interviews were employed. Interviews were conducted with 30 adolescents in the centre of Oslo, as well as with 10 former drug users, three police officers and three field workers. We were also given access to police statistics and authorised to do our own analysis of the material. The most important result was that adolescents seemed rather to avoid than to be attracted to this open drug scene in Oslo. Based on the presentation of qualitative data we suggest that this was due to the social definition of the drug scene. Because they experienced a great social distance between themselves and the regulars at the open drug scene, adolescents seemed to avoid Plata. Moreover, the scene was symbolically associated with heroin and injection as the route of administration, which had low prestige among the adolescents. Despite these findings, adolescents' recruitment to drug use was the key issue in the political debate following the closure. We point to the shared rhetorical interest among important institutional actors in framing the issue in this way. The argument was also embedded in widely shared public representations of adolescents and drug users as passive and irrational.
PubMed ID
18378132 View in PubMed
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200 records – page 1 of 20.