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107 records – page 1 of 11.

Abortion services in Canada: a patchwork quilt with many holes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195196
Source
CMAJ. 2001 Mar 20;164(6):847-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001

Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 7;92(23):2380
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1995
Author
P. Wölner-Hanssen
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Jun 7;92(23):2380
Date
Jun-7-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Models, Economic
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
7783501 View in PubMed
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[A health policy perspective on fertility development in Norway. 1880-2000]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65711
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1983 Mar 20;103(8-9):795-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1983

Alcohol use during pregnancy in Canada: how policy moments can create opportunities for promoting women's health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114392
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Mar-Apr;104(2):e170-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy Poole
Lorraine Greaves
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health, Vancouver, BC. npoole@cw.bc.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Mar-Apr;104(2):e170-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Anniversaries and Special Events
Canada
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
This article addresses the challenge of igniting action on health promotion for women in Canada with respect to alcohol use during pregnancy. We illustrate that accelerated action on health promotion for women that engages multiple levels of players, women-centred and harm-reduction frameworks and a gendered approach to understanding women's lives can be achieved when the right policy moment occurs. We illustrate this by describing the opportunity afforded by the Olympic Games in 2010, where the BC government used the Games to encourage action on women's health promotion and the prevention of alcohol use in pregnancy. We suggest that the 2011 announcement of new low-risk drinking guidelines that recommend lower intake of alcohol for women than for men offers another, to date unused, opportunity.
PubMed ID
23618212 View in PubMed
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Anniversary of injustice: April fool's day, 1994. Will the Enactment of Bill C-6 be the birthday of equitable reproductive health care in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180335
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2004 Apr;26(4):321-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

At the edges of embodiment: determinants of breastfeeding for First Nations women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260272
Source
Breastfeed Med. 2014 May;9(4):203-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Rachel Eni
Wanda Phillips-Beck
Punam Mehta
Source
Breastfeed Med. 2014 May;9(4):203-14
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - ethnology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Decision Making
Fathers - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - psychology
Pain
Pregnancy
Public Opinion
Self Concept
Social Support
Time Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
In Canada, First Nations women are far less likely to breastfeed than other women. First Nations people have been subjected to massive health and social disparities and are at the lowest end of the scale on every measure of well-being. The purpose of this study is to understand the experiences, strengths, and challenges of breastfeeding for First Nations women. Central to the current research is the notion of an embodiment within indigenous women's health and, more specifically, breastfeeding perspectives.
Guided by an indigenous feminist standpoint, our research study evolved through honest discussions and is informed by relevant public health literature on breastfeeding. We collected quantitative data through a survey on demographics and feeding practices, and we conducted focus groups in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario) over a period of 1 year (2010) from 65 women in seven First Nation communities.
Three overarching themes are discussed: social factors, including perceptions of self; breastfeeding environments; and intimacy, including the contribution of fathers. The main findings are that breastfeeding is conducive to bed sharing, whereas a history of residential school attendance, physical and psychological trauma, evacuations for childbirth, and teen pregnancy are obstacles to breastfeeding. Also, fathers play a pivotal role in a woman's decision to breastfeed.
Findings from this study contribute to informing public health by reconsidering simplistic health promotion and public health policies and, instead, educating First Nations communities about the complexity of factors associated with multiple breastfeeding environments.
PubMed ID
24606065 View in PubMed
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At what cost to health? Tlicho women's medical travel for childbirth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80306
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):228-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Moffitt Pertice M
Vollman Ardene Robinson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Kinesiology and Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Contemp Nurse. 2006 Sep;22(2):228-39
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Maternal health services
Northwest Territories
Parturition
Pregnancy
Risk Management
Travel
Abstract
Medical travel policies are instituted in all rural and remote areas of Canada as a means of providing universal health care services to residents. These policies are framed, developed and implemented from a colonial perspective and require re-examination through a more inclusive and collaborative postcolonial lens. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the medical travel policy for childbirth in Canada's Northwest Territories from a postcolonial perspective and in consideration of the cultural safety of pregnant Tlicho women. The context within which Tlicho birthing and this policy thrives is reviewed along with the exploration of future possibilities. Personal, socioeconomic, political and legal factors surrounding birthing are highlighted. It is anticipated, that by illuminating the oppressive and paternalistic nature of this childbirth policy, there will be heightened awareness that fosters transitions within the system to transform current risk discourse creating new possibilities for Tlicho women in the birth of their babies.
PubMed ID
17026430 View in PubMed
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Avoiding anomalous newborns: preemptive abortion, treatment thresholds and the case of baby Messenger.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58723
Source
J Med Ethics. 2000 Aug;26(4):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
M L Gross
Author Affiliation
University of Haifa, Israel.
Source
J Med Ethics. 2000 Aug;26(4):242-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities
Abortion, Induced - standards
Clinical Protocols
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Euthanasia, Passive
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care, Neonatal - economics - standards
Internationality
Israel
Patient Selection
Personal Autonomy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Presumed Consent
Risk assessment
United States
Withholding Treatment
Abstract
In its American context the case of baby Messenger, a preterm infant disconnected from life-support by his father and allowed to die has generated debate about neonatal treatment protocols. Limited by the legal and ethical norms of the United States, this case did not consider treatment protocols that might be available in other countries such as Denmark and Israel: threshold protocols whereby certain classes of newborns are not treated, and preemptive abortion allowing one to choose late-term abortion rather than risk delivery. Each offers a viable and ethically sound avenue for dealing with the economic and social expense of anomalous newborns by aborting or not treating those most likely to burden the health care system. Objections that these protocols are antithetical to American bioethical principles are considered but rejected as each policy answers to economic justice, utility and respect for autonomy.
PubMed ID
10951918 View in PubMed
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107 records – page 1 of 11.