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The 2015 hospital treatment choice reform in Norway: Continuity or change?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285277
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Ånen Ringard
Ingrid Sperre Saunes
Anna Sagan
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Apr;120(4):350-5
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Choice Behavior
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Expenditures
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - economics - organization & administration
Hospitals, Private - economics
Humans
Norway
Patient Preference
Politics
Waiting Lists
Abstract
In several European countries, including Norway, polices to increase patient choice of hospital provider have remained high on the political agenda. The main reason behind the interest in hospital choice reforms in Norway has been the belief that increasing choice can remedy the persistent problem of long waiting times for elective hospital care. Prior to the 2013 General Election, the Conservative Party campaigned in favour of a new choice reform: "the treatment choice reform". This article describes the background and process leading up to introduction of the reform in the autumn of 2015. It also provides a description of the content and discusses possible implications of the reform for patients, providers and government bodies. In sum, the reform contains elements of both continuity and change. The main novelty of the reform lies in the increased role of private for-profit healthcare providers.
PubMed ID
27005300 View in PubMed
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The 2015 National Cancer Program in Sweden: Introducing standardized care pathways in a decentralized system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284148
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Jens Wilkens
Hans Thulesius
Ingrid Schmidt
Christina Carlsson
Source
Health Policy. 2016 Dec;120(12):1378-1382
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antineoplastic Protocols - standards
Continuity of Patient Care
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Policy
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient satisfaction
Politics
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Starting in 2015, the Swedish government has initiated a national reform to standardize cancer patient pathways and thereby eventually speed up treatment of cancer. Cancer care in Sweden is characterized by high survival rates and a generally high quality albeit long waiting times. The objective with the new national program to standardize cancer care pathways is to reduce these waiting times, increase patient satisfaction with cancer care and reduce regional inequalities. A new time-point for measuring the start of a care process is introduced called well-founded suspicion, which is individually designed for each cancer diagnosis. While medical guidelines are well established earlier, the standardisation is achieved by defining time boundaries for each step in the process. The cancer reform program is a collaborative effort initiated and incentivized by the central government while multi-professional groups develop the time-bound standardized care pathways, which the regional authorities are responsible for implementing. The broad stakeholder engagement and time-bound guidelines are interesting approaches to study for other countries that need to streamline care processes.
PubMed ID
27823827 View in PubMed
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Addressing individual behaviours and living conditions: four Nordic public health policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136211
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 Suppl):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Signild Vallgårda
Author Affiliation
Unit of Health Services Research, Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade, Copenhagen, Denmark. s.vallgarda@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(6 Suppl):6-10
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Finland
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Humans
Norway
Politics
Public Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
To identify characteristics of the public health policies of four Nordic countries concerning how they present the causes of ill health, the best ways to deal with these causes, and where to place responsibility; additionally, to investigate whether there is a common Nordic policy.
Analyses of recent public health programmes in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden.
Focus is on either, or both, individual behaviour and living conditions as causes of ill health; the remedies are classical liberal as well as social democratic policies. None of the programmes is consistent with either ideological strand; each has its peculiar combination of interpretations and policies. The Danish programme is the most liberal focusing on behaviours and individual's choices; the Norwegian programme is the most social democratic or social liberal focusing mostly on the social and physical environment and the politicians' responsibility to improve the population's health. The Swedish and the Finnish programmes lie between those of Denmark and Norway. The Finnish and Norwegian governments stress their responsibility for the health of the population.
No common Nordic political approach to public health exists. All programmes contain contradictory policies and ideological statements with differences regarding the emphasis on individual behaviour versus choice and living conditions and political responsibility. The policies are not entirely predictable from the political stance of the government; national differences seem to play a role.
PubMed ID
21382843 View in PubMed
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Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2008 Apr;33(2):281-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Benjamin Mason Meier
James G Hodge
Kristine M Gebbie
Author Affiliation
Columbia University, New York, USA.
Source
J Health Polit Policy Law. 2008 Apr;33(2):281-93
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Health Policy
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Politics
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health Practice - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The Turning Point Model State Public Health Act (Turning Point Act), published in September 2003, provides a comprehensive template for states seeking public health law modernization. This case study examines the political and policy efforts undertaken in Alaska following the development of the Turning Point Act. It is the first in a series of case studies to assess states' consideration of the Turning Point Act for the purpose of public health law reform. Through a comparative analysis of these case studies and ongoing legislative tracking in all fifty states, researchers can assess (1) how states codify the Turning Point Act into state law and (2) how these modernized state laws influence or change public health practice, leading to improved health outcomes.
PubMed ID
18325901 View in PubMed
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The ambition of Health in All Policies in Norway: The role of political leadership and bureaucratic change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285276
Source
Health Policy. 2016 May;120(5):567-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Hege Hofstad
Source
Health Policy. 2016 May;120(5):567-75
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health equity
Health Policy
Humans
Leadership
Local Government
Norway
Politics
Public Health Administration
Abstract
This paper presents and discusses status, challenges and future developments of Health in All Policies (HiAP) in Norway. Within the frames of the identified challenge of creating coordinated and durable policies and practices in local government, it discusses The Norwegian HiAP policy. More specifically, the paper identifies status and challenges for instituting firmer political and administrative attention to population health and health equity across administrative sectors and levels, and discusses how national authorities may stimulate more coordinated and durable HiAP policies and practices in the future.
PubMed ID
27017049 View in PubMed
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An all-embracing problem description. The Swedish drug issue as a political catalyst 1982-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112855
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):558-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Johan Edman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: johan.edman@sorad.su.se.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 Nov;24(6):558-65
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Drug Users - legislation & jurisprudence
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Policy Making
Politics
Social Control Policies - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Control, Formal
Social Problems - legislation & jurisprudence
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This article examines the political formulation and ideological solution of the Swedish drug problem in 1982-2000. How was the drug problem described in the Swedish parliament at the time? How serious was the problem and what solutions were proposed? What were the ideological implications of the problem description, and how was the general political and ideological solution formulated?
The empirical basis for the textual analysis consists of parliamentary bills, government bills and parliamentary records discussing the drug issue during the years 1982-2000.
In the prevailing spirit of consensus in the Swedish parliament at the time, both left-wing and right-wing parties portrayed drugs as a threat to the nation, people and the welfare state. Still, as the ideological dimension kept growing stronger, the drug question functioned even better as an arena for political discussions and ideological positions than in the 1970s.
Compared to previous decades, the problem description broadened during the 1980s and 1990s, and the drug problem could be used to support arguments on almost any topic. The drug problem became a highly politicized issue about whom or what to change when the individual and the society clashed, but also about what the individual and/or society should be changed into.
PubMed ID
23790617 View in PubMed
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An anthropological analysis of European Union (EU) health governance as biopolitics: the case of the EU tissues and cells directive.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144341
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Jun;70(12):1867-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Klaus Hoeyer
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Science and Technology Studies, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5, P.O. Box 2099, Copenhagen, Denmark. klho@sund.ku.dk
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Jun;70(12):1867-73
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Denmark
European Union
Government Regulation
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Observation
Physician-Patient Relations
Policy Making
Politics
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
Healthcare in Europe is increasingly influenced by European Union (EU) regulation enacted to harmonise heterogeneous practices through common safety standards. In many instances directives on safety issues evade public debate because they are seen as merely 'technical matters'. In this paper I analyse the implications at a national level in Denmark of one such piece of legislation: the EU Tissues and Cells Directive. The analysis is based on participant observation, interviews and document analysis conducted in the period from May 2007 to June 2009. I follow translations of the Directive from the level of the EU text into national legislation and further into everyday practices. From a biopolitical perspective, I explore the implications of this so-called technical directive that appear necessary for policymakers and yet remain strangely detached from the everyday experiences of people for whom and on whom it is supposed to work. The Directive has serious implications for the allocation of funds, for patients and for healthcare professionals. These implications need to be discussed. Even more basically, the analysis points to a need for discussing what makes so-called technical directives necessary. This article is intended to facilitate this type of debate.
PubMed ID
20378227 View in PubMed
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An epidemiological approach towards measuring the trade-off between equity and efficiency in health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212666
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
L. Lindholm
M. Rosén
M. Emmelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research - methods
Health status
Humans
Models, Economic
Pilot Projects
Politics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Social Class
Social Justice - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
The concept of social welfare functions has been discussed in health economic literature, as it provides a way of examining the extent to which society is prepared to accept a trade-off between efficiency and equity. In this paper requirements for meaningful empirical estimates of the willingness to accept lower per capita health status in order to achieve greater equity are examined. Results from a pilot study aimed at testing the proposed measurement procedure are reported. They show that at least two thirds of the politicians who participated are prepared to accept a lower growth in per capita health in exchange for increased equity. Accordingly, we found a weak empirical support for the common health economic assumption that only total health benefit should guide the use of resources.
PubMed ID
10157398 View in PubMed
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Another look at the human papillomavirus vaccine experience in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132021
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Oct;101(10):1850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Catherine L Mah
Raisa B Deber
Astrid Guttmann
Allison McGeer
Murray Krahn
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. catherine.mah@utoronto.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Oct;101(10):1850-7
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cancer Vaccines - therapeutic use
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs - organization & administration
Mandatory Programs
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - therapeutic use
Policy Making
Politics
Public Health
United States
Women's health
Abstract
Policy debates about immunization frequently focus on classic trade-offs between individual versus collective well-being. Publicly funded immunization programs are usually justified on the basis of widespread public benefit with minimal individual risk. We discuss the example of the policy process surrounding the adoption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Canada to consider whether public good arguments continue to dominate immunization policymaking. Specifically, we show how a range of stakeholders framed HPV vaccination as a personal-rather than a public-matter, despite the absence of a controversy over mandatory immunization as was the case in the United States. Our findings suggest an erosion of the persuasiveness of public good arguments around collective immunization programs in the policy discourse.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21852642 View in PubMed
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An overall approach to health care for indigenous peoples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146929
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1239-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Malcolm King
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta Pulmonary Research Group, CIHR Institute of Aboriginal Peoples' Health, University of Alberta, 173 HMRC University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2S2, Canada. malcolm.king@ualberta.ca
Source
Pediatr Clin North Am. 2009 Dec;56(6):1239-42
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards - trends
Educational Status
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards - trends
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Holistic Health
Humans
Politics
Population Groups
Poverty
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Vulnerable Populations
World Health
Abstract
Indigenous peoples across all the continents of the globe live with major gaps in health status and health outcomes associated with well-described social determinants of health, such as poverty and poor education. Indigenous peoples face additional health determinant issues associated with urbanization, isolation from traditional territories, and loss of cultural continuity. Indigenous children are particularly vulnerable as they grow up in isolation from their cultural and social roots and yet are also separated from the mainstream environment of their society. Programs to address these difficult health issues should be viewed as complex clinical interventions with health researchers, social scientists, and clinicians working together with Indigenous peoples to identify the most pressing needs and most appropriate and workable solutions that will result in effective policies and practices.
PubMed ID
19962019 View in PubMed
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175 records – page 1 of 18.