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183 records – page 1 of 19.

Aboriginal community alcohol harm reduction policy (ACAHRP) project: a vision for the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159852
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Louis Gliksman
Margaret Rylett
Ronald R Douglas
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention & Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction & Mental Health, London, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. louis_gliksman@camh.net
Source
Subst Use Misuse. 2007;42(12-13):1851-66
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Harm Reduction
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Ownership
Population Groups
Abstract
Four First Nation communities in Ontario, Canada, formulated alcohol management policies between 1992 and 1994. An alcohol management policy is a local control option to manage alcohol use in recreation and leisure areas. Survey results indicate that decreases in alcohol use-related problems related to intoxication, nuisance behaviors, criminal activity, liquor license violations, and personal harm were perceived to have occurred. Furthermore, having policy regulations in place did not have an adverse effect on facility rentals. Band administrators and facility staff in each community felt the policy had had a positive effect on events at which alcohol was sold or served.
PubMed ID
18075913 View in PubMed
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Age disparities in stroke quality of care and delivery of health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149008
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Gustavo Saposnik
Sandra E Black
Antoine Hakim
Jiming Fang
Jack V Tu
Moira K Kapral
Author Affiliation
Stroke Research Unit, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. saposnikg@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Stroke. 2009 Oct;40(10):3328-35
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Deglutition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Female
Health Policy
Health Services - economics
Hospital Units - standards - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Longevity
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - economics
Patient Discharge - economics
Pneumonia - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Life
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - mortality - therapy
Thrombolytic Therapy - statistics & numerical data - trends
Warfarin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Limited information is available on the effect of age on stroke management and care delivery. Our aim was to determine whether access to stroke care, delivery of health services, and clinical outcomes after stroke are affected by age.
This was a prospective cohort study of patients with acute ischemic stroke in the province of Ontario, Canada, admitted to stroke centers participating in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network between July 1, 2003 and March 31, 2005. Primary outcomes were the following selected indicators of quality stroke care: (1) use of thrombolysis; (2) dysphagia screening; (3) admission to a stroke unit; (4) carotid imaging; (5) antithrombotic therapy; and (6) warfarin for atrial fibrillation at discharge. Secondary outcomes were risk-adjusted stroke fatality, discharge disposition, pneumonia, and length of hospital stay.
Among 3631 patients with ischemic stroke, 1219 (33.6%) were older than 80 years. There were no significant differences in stroke care delivery by age group. Stroke fatality increased with age, with a 30-day risk adjusted fatality of 7.1%, 6.5%, 8.8%, and 14.8% for those aged 59 or younger, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and 80 years or older, respectively. Those aged older than 80 years had a longer length of hospitalization, increased risk of pneumonia, and higher disability at discharge compared to those younger than 80. This group was also less likely to be discharged home.
In the context of a province-wide coordinated stroke care system, stroke care delivery was similar across all age groups with the exception of slightly lower rates of investigations in the very elderly. Increasing age was associated with stroke severity and stroke case-fatality.
PubMed ID
19696418 View in PubMed
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Aging at home: integrating community-based care for older persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146213
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):8-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
A Paul Williams
Janet M Lum
Raisa Deber
Robin Montgomery
Kerry Kuluski
Allie Peckham
Jillian Watkins
Alex Williams
Alvin Ying
Lynn Zhu
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2009;10(1):8-21
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated
Health Policy
Health Services for the Aged
Home Care Services
Humans
Ontario
Abstract
Integrating community-based health and social care has grabbed international attention as a way of addressing the needs of aging populations while contributing to health systems' sustainability. However, integrating initiatives in different jurisdictions work (or do not work) within very various institutional and structural dynamics. The question is, what transferable lessons can we learn to guide policy makers and policy innovators at the local level? In this paper, we consider "aging at home" as a policy option in Ontario, and beyond. In the first section, we focus on the problem, in effect, what not to do. Here, we briefly review findings from national and international research literature and from our own research in Ontario that identify the costs and consequences of non-systems of care for older persons. In the second part, we turn to solutions, in effect, what to do. Drawing on our recent scoping review of the international literature, we identify three guiding principles, as well as a number of recommendations, for integrating care for older persons, knowing that important details of how to put such initiatives "on the ground" will be provided by other contributors to this journal edition.
PubMed ID
20057212 View in PubMed
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AIDS and organized medicine: our profession has failed to lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233320
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Mar 15;138(6):560-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1988
Author
I. Mackie
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Mar 15;138(6):560-1
Date
Mar-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy
Adult
Canada
Child
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Ontario
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
3345482 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jun 15;138(12):1083-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1988
Author
J. Krauser
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Jun 15;138(12):1083-5
Date
Jun-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - prevention & control - therapy
Health Policy
Humans
Ontario
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
3370586 View in PubMed
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Alcoholism treatment in Canada: a review of current programs and policy issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244501
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1981
Author
A E Reid
Source
Int J Addict. 1981 May;16(4):647-81
Date
May-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - economics - rehabilitation - therapy
Canada
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Language
Ontario
Sex Factors
Abstract
An overview of the specialized alcoholism treatment field in Canada is presented based on a 1976 national survey of 338 programs. Descriptive information on these programs is presented to provide an understanding of the state of current treatment efforts and to identify emersent policy issues in this field. Programs activities are described under six headings: (1) the pattern of program development, (2) types of treatment agencies, (3) treatment capacity and utilization, (4) the characteristics of persons using treatment services, (5) approaches employed in treatment, and (6) program costs and financing of alcoholism treatment. Findings from the national study are related to three policy issues: access, quality, and cost. The need for future research aimed at these issues is discussed.
PubMed ID
7287245 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-related policy measures in Ontario: who supports what and to what degree?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195320
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Anglin
L. Kavanagh
N. Giesbrecht
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Addiction Research Foundation Site, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 2S1. lise_anglin@camh.net
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jan-Feb;92(1):24-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Data Collection
Educational Status
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Ontario
Policy Making
Public Health
Public Opinion
Abstract
Using 1998 provincial survey data (n = 1,205), the authors examine responses to 7 items concerning public opinion on alcohol-related policy in Ontario. The purpose of the study is to get a sense of overall public opinion on certain topical policy-related measures and to see whether this opinion is predicted by demographic characteristics of respondents (sex, age and self-reported drinking pattern). Cross-tabulations of opinion items with demographic variables revealed strong majority support for the status quo with regard to number of liquor and beer stores, beer and liquor store hours, and prohibition of the sale of alcohol in corner stores. A somewhat less robust majority also supported the status quo for alcohol taxes and legal drinking age. Among the demographic groups, high-risk heavy drinkers stood out for their greater support of relaxation of controls and this finding was confirmed by means of logistic regression. The majority of all groups, except frequent bar-goers, liked the idea of warning labels on alcoholic beverage containers. The authors conclude that, according to these survey data, policy initiatives towards greater access to alcohol, such as extended liquor store hours and sale of alcohol in corner stores, are not mandated by the majority of the population of Ontario.
PubMed ID
11257985 View in PubMed
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Analysis of factors affecting demand for rehabilitation services in Ontario, Canada: a health-policy perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154027
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2008;30(24):1837-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Michel D Landry
Susan Jaglal
Walter P Wodchis
Jen Raman
Cheryl A Cott
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. mike.landry@utoronto.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2008;30(24):1837-47
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Ontario
Rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Demand for health services tends to outstrip supply in an environment of economic scarcity.
In this research, we first explore factors affecting demand for rehabilitation services in Canada's most populous province of Ontario; we then interpret these findings and discuss their implications for future demand.
Consistent with health-policy case-study methodology, we triangulated primary and secondary data sources (42 key-informant interviews and review of publicly available documents, respectively).
Demand for rehabilitation seems to be rising quickly across Ontario's continuum of care, and informants identified four primary factors: (1) overall population growth along with an increasingly large cohort aged 65 years or older; (2) increasing rates of chronic and complex conditions, along with changes in hospital discharge patterns; (3) increasing public expectations; and (4) advances in treatment and management of diseases and condition.
Although demand may be rising, access to rehabilitation is now based more on eligibility than on demand alone. The presence of increasing demand does not ensure that there is, or will be, sufficient financial or human resources to meet such demand. This study signals the need to reflect on current policies regarding access, and highlights the need to consider the benefits of health-promotion and injury-prevention strategies in mediating demand.
PubMed ID
19037778 View in PubMed
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An annotated chronology of the history of AIDS in Toronto: the first five years, 1981-1986.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170667
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(2):313-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mark L Robertson
Author Affiliation
Scott Library, York University.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2005;22(2):313-51
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - history - mortality - transmission
Chronology as Topic
Female
Health Policy - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Male
Ontario
Abstract
The purpose of this annotated chronology is to help provide a framework for research into the history of the first five years of the AIDS epidemic in Canada but especially as it unfolded in Toronto, Canada. The chronological entries can be used to identify the order and relationship of particular themes, while the sources listed in the chronology can be used as points of reference for further investigations. This chronology is primarily derived from reports in key newspapers based in the Toronto region. Each chronological entry lists the sources which reported on the particular event.
PubMed ID
16482707 View in PubMed
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183 records – page 1 of 19.