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An epidemiological approach towards measuring the trade-off between equity and efficiency in health policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212666
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
L. Lindholm
M. Rosén
M. Emmelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Health Policy. 1996 Mar;35(3):205-16
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Rationing - standards
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research - methods
Health status
Humans
Models, Economic
Pilot Projects
Politics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Social Class
Social Justice - economics
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden
Value of Life
Abstract
The concept of social welfare functions has been discussed in health economic literature, as it provides a way of examining the extent to which society is prepared to accept a trade-off between efficiency and equity. In this paper requirements for meaningful empirical estimates of the willingness to accept lower per capita health status in order to achieve greater equity are examined. Results from a pilot study aimed at testing the proposed measurement procedure are reported. They show that at least two thirds of the politicians who participated are prepared to accept a lower growth in per capita health in exchange for increased equity. Accordingly, we found a weak empirical support for the common health economic assumption that only total health benefit should guide the use of resources.
PubMed ID
10157398 View in PubMed
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Assessment of health policy in Costa Rica--some preliminary remarks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8305
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1991;46:82-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C G Eriksson
E. Mohs
B. Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Göteborg.
Source
Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1991;46:82-91
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Costa Rica - epidemiology
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Health Planning - standards
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Mortality - trends
Policy Making
Politics
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Costa Rica is one of the world's success stories in primary health care. During the past 20 years the country has experienced a demographic and epidemiological transition. However, during the 80's the economic recession severely affected the country. The social, economic, political and geographic contexts are important for the assessment of health policy. The longstanding democracy, investments in public education and health all contribute to the peace and stability. Assessment of health policy needs both a quantitative and qualitative approach. The policy-making process--how policies are made, translated into action and evaluated--is a research challenge. The national health policy 1986-1990 includes commitment to Health for All strategy; development of the National Health Care System; strengthening of the health care infrastructure; consolidation of health achievements and undertaking of new problems and approaches on integral care for the population; community participation in all health care system activities; and health care priorities. Important research issues are the relationship between the needs of the population and health policy development and the impacts of health policy on the health of the population. A comprehensive study of policy-making includes studies of policy content, process, output and evaluation of impacts (including economy of health policy), and analysis for policy, i.e. information for policy making, process and policy advocacy. Recent successful health policy issues are child health and HIV/AIDS, while water pollution and traffic accidents have been more problematic policy issues.
PubMed ID
1805372 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Irving Rootman
Peggy Edwards
Author Affiliation
Centre for Community Health Promotion Research, University of Victoria, Box 3060, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3R4. irootman@uvic.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S43-6
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services Research
Humans
Power (Psychology)
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This concluding article comments on what we learned from the conference, what we still need to know, and what we need to do now. It describes what participants said about the impact of the conference and the follow-up steps that have been taken so far. In terms of what we learned, there was agreement on the importance of culture in understanding literacy and health literacy; the importance of context; the integral relationship between literacy and health literacy and the concept of "empowerment;" the value of efforts to improve health through literacy and health literacy; and the need for collaboration. We need more and better information on how our various efforts are working; the cost of low literacy; the links between health, education, and lifelong learning; the needs and strengths of Aboriginal people, and the perspectives of Francophone and ethnocultural groups. Specific topics worthy of pursuit are suggested. They are followed by a list of recommendations from the conference related to focussing on language and culture, and to building best practices, knowledge, and healthy public policy. The paper presents some findings from the conference evaluation, which suggests that the conference met its goals. It concludes by reporting on actions that have been taken to implement the conference recommendations, including the establishment of a Health Literacy Expert Committee and the submission of several funding proposals.
PubMed ID
16805161 View in PubMed
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Beginning patient flow modeling in Vancouver Coastal Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170927
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2005 Dec;28(6):323-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Mark Chase
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Coastal Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Mark.Chase@vch.ca
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2005 Dec;28(6):323-5
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Health Plan Implementation - organization & administration
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Humans
Inpatients - classification
Length of Stay
Models, organizational
Models, Theoretical
Patient Admission
Abstract
This paper reports on the development of patient flow modeling in Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH). The first section provides the context for the initiative. The organizational priority is then presented, with the project's purpose and goals. The initial models are briefly identified. The paper closes with examples of possible future directions for modeling in VCH.
PubMed ID
16450624 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S37-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lynn Chiarelli
Peggy Edwards
Author Affiliation
Canadian Public Health Association, 400-1565 Carling Ave., Ottawa, ON K1Z 8R1. lchiarelli@cpha.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 May-Jun;97 Suppl 2:S37-42
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Communication Barriers
Cooperative Behavior
Cultural Diversity
Educational Status
Ethnic Groups - education - psychology
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Health Services Research
Humans
Middle Aged
Program Development
Public Health - education
Abstract
Policies in literacy and health need to address two perspectives: how basic literacy skills influence the health of populations and individuals; and health literacy--the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. There are three potential areas for action to improve literacy and health literacy: the health system, the education system, and within the broader sphere of culture and society. Despite some increasing attention in the last 20 years, low literacy levels remain a major problem in Canada. Policies need to be sensitive to culture, especially among Aboriginal peoples, Francophones and new Canadians. Public policies are needed to: Improve literacy outcomes (for example, support for a pan-Canadian literacy strategy, early childhood education and family literacy programs, and efforts to reduce high school drop out). Improve health literacy (for example, support integrated policy and program development across sectors, integrated research and knowledge translation initiatives, and efforts to build links between literacy and health networks). Reduce disparities by strengthening levels of literacy and health literacy among vulnerable groups.
PubMed ID
16805160 View in PubMed
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Source
Public Health Genomics. 2009;12(2):112-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
J. Little
B. Potter
J. Allanson
T. Caulfield
J C Carroll
B. Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. jlittle@uottawa.ca
Source
Public Health Genomics. 2009;12(2):112-20
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cohort Studies
Community Health Services
Congenital Abnormalities - diagnosis
Ethics, Medical
Genetic Testing - methods
Genomics - methods
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Humans
Infant, Newborn
National Health Programs
Neonatal Screening - methods
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods
Public Health - methods
Abstract
Canada has a diverse population of 32 million people and a universal, publicly funded health care system provided through provincial and territorial health insurance plans. Public health activities are resourced at provincial/territorial level with strategic coordination from national bodies. Canada has one of the longest-standing genetics professional specialty organizations and is one of the few countries offering master's level training designed specifically for genetic counselors. Prenatal screening is offered as part of routine clinical prenatal services with variable uptake. Surveillance of the effect of prenatal screening and diagnosis on the birth prevalence of congenital anomalies is limited by gaps and variations in surveillance systems. Newborn screening programs vary between provinces and territories in terms of organization and conditions screened for. The last decade has witnessed a four-fold increase in requests for genetic testing, especially for late onset diseases. Tests are performed in provincial laboratories or outside Canada. There is wide variation in participation in laboratory quality assurance schemes, and there are few regulatory frameworks in Canada that are directly relevant to genetics testing services or population genetics. Health technology assessment in Canada is conducted by a diverse range of organizations, several of which have produced reports related to genetics. Several large-scale population cohort studies are underway or planned, with initiatives to harmonize their conduct and the management of ethical issues, both within Canada and with similar projects in other countries.
PubMed ID
19039255 View in PubMed
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Congestive heart failure: A national priority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192031
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1243-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
E. Wilson
Author Affiliation
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2001 Dec;17(12):1243-4
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Care Costs
Health education
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Heart Failure - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Population Surveillance
Public Health Practice
PubMed ID
11773934 View in PubMed
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Considerations for regional health authorities in the provision of environmental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209319
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(2):5-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M. Wanke
L D Saunders
S. Hrudey
T L Guidotti
Author Affiliation
Wanke and Associates, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(2):5-25
Date
1996
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Community Health Planning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Financing, Government
Health Policy
Health Priorities
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Public Health Administration
Regional Health Planning - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Abstract
As population health programs, environmental health services differ fundamentally from other forms of health service delivery. At a time when the health sector is striving for integration, the incorporation of these unique services into the delivery system presents a unique challenge to policy makers and administrators across the country. The University of Alberta recently completed a comprehensive review and redesign of locally governed and delivered environmental health protection services in Alberta. This paper outlines the key issues and unique features surrounding the delivery of environmental health services and presents the study team's suggested approach to addressing these issues.
PubMed ID
10159414 View in PubMed
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The contribution of the World Health Organization to a new public health and health promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186510
Source
Am J Public Health. 2003 Mar;93(3):383-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Ilona Kickbusch
Author Affiliation
Division of Global Health, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. ilona.kickbusch@yale.edu
Source
Am J Public Health. 2003 Mar;93(3):383-8
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation
Europe
Health Policy - trends
Health Priorities
Health Services Research
Health status
Healthy People Programs
Humans
Models, organizational
Public Health Practice
Social Change
United States
World Health Organization
Abstract
The author traces the development of the concept of health promotion from 1980s policies of the World Health Organization. Two approaches that signify the modernization of public health are outlined in detail: the European Health for All targets and the settings approach. Both aim to reorient health policy priorities from a risk factor approach to strategies that address the determinants of health and empower people to participate in improving the health of their communities. These approaches combine classic public health dictums with "new" strategies, some setting explicit goals to integrate public health with general welfare policy. Health for All, health promotion, and population health have contributed to this reorientation in thinking and strategy, but the focus of health policy remains expenditure rather than investment.
Notes
Cites: Health Promot Int. 2001 Dec;16(4):339-5311733453
Cites: Health Med. 1985 Spring;3(2-3):43-410275418
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Mar 17;281(11):1030-310086439
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 1997;21(4 Spec No):431-49308213
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1986;22(2):117-243961531
PubMed ID
12604477 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.