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Advocacy groups for breast cancer patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215572
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1995
Author
M. Waller
S. Batt
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology and Sociology, John Abbott College, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1995 Mar 15;152(6):829-33
Date
Mar-15-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Decision Making
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Patient Advocacy - trends
Research Support as Topic
Self-Help Groups
Abstract
Breast cancer patient advocacy groups emerged in the 1990s to support and empower women with breast cancer. Women with cancer and oncologists tend to have divergent perspectives on how breast cancer prevention should be defined and what the priorities for research should be. As their American counterparts have done, breast cancer patient advocates in Canada are seeking greater participation in decision making with respect to research. To date they have had more input into research policy decisions than into the planning of specific projects. In 1993 the National Forum on Breast Cancer recommended that women with breast cancer should have more input into the research process; breast cancer patient advocates will continue to actively pursue this objective.
Notes
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1990 Summer;6(2):33-452376805
Cites: Lancet. 1992 Nov 7;340(8828):1143-51359220
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1994;(16):139-477999456
Cites: J Palliat Care. 1992 Winter;8(4):30-71487790
Cites: Med J Aust. 1992 Oct 19;157(8):553-51479978
PubMed ID
7697576 View in PubMed
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Anti-smoking policy in Russia: Relevant factors and program planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298609
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2018 08; 69:43-52
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
08-2018
Author
Tatiana Kossova
Elena Kossova
Maria Sheluntcova
Author Affiliation
National Research University Higher School of Economics, 20 Myasnitskaya Street, Moscow 101000, Russia.
Source
Eval Program Plann. 2018 08; 69:43-52
Date
08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Awards and Prizes
Decision Making
Female
Health Policy
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Program Development
Risk factors
Rural Population
Russia - epidemiology
Smoking - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation
Smoking Prevention - economics - methods
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
In this paper, we consider anti-smoking policy in Russia and the socioeconomic factors that influence an individual's decision to smoke. Among various factors, we investigate the individual time preferences of Russians. To estimate individual time preferences, we use an experiment in which survey respondents are given hypothetical money prizes. We find that being middle-aged, being unmarried and having parents who smoke are positively correlated with both men and women's likelihood of taking up smoking in Russia. We consider the possible endogeneity of an individual's health status and find a positive relationship between smoking and the time preferences of Russians. Our findings confirm that decisionmakers should devote their efforts primarily to developing restrictive anti-smoking policy. The choice of policy measures should be guided by the individual characteristics of target population groups. Social advertising, public lectures and preventive care should be actively engaged in forming public attitudes towards smoking.
PubMed ID
29674222 View in PubMed
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Assessing the impacts of citizen deliberations on the health technology process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108650
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2013 Jul;29(3):282-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Julia Abelson
Yvonne Bombard
François-Pierre Gauvin
Dorina Simeonov
Sarah Boesveld
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2013 Jul;29(3):282-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Consumer Participation
Decision Making
Health Policy
Humans
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Social Values
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
We assessed the impacts of a Citizens' Reference Panel on the deliberations of a provincial health technology advisory committee and its secretariat, which produce, recommendations for the use of health technologies in Ontario, Canada.
A fourteen-member citizens' reference panel was convened five times between February 2009 and May 2010 to participate in informed, facilitated discussions to inform the assessment of individual technologies and provincial health technology assessment processes more generally. Qualitative data collection methods were used to document observed and perceived impacts of the citizens' panel on the health technology assessment (HTA) process.
Panel impacts were observed for all technologies reviewed, at two different stages in the HTA process, and represented macro- (raising awareness) and micro-level (informing recommendations) impacts. These impacts were shaped by periodic opportunities for direct and brokered exchange between the Panel and the expert advisory committee to clarify roles, foster accountability, and build trust. Our findings offer new insights about one of the main considerations in the design of deliberative participatory structures-how to maintain the independence of a citizens' panel while ensuring that their input is considered at key junctures in the HTA process.
Citizens' panels can exert various impacts on the HTA process. Ensuring these types of structures include opportunities for direct exchange between citizens and experts, to clarify roles, promote accountability, and build trust will facilitate their impacts in a variety of settings.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2013 Oct;29(4):466
PubMed ID
23863188 View in PubMed
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At the edges of embodiment: determinants of breastfeeding for First Nations women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260272
Source
Breastfeed Med. 2014 May;9(4):203-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Rachel Eni
Wanda Phillips-Beck
Punam Mehta
Source
Breastfeed Med. 2014 May;9(4):203-14
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - ethnology - psychology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Decision Making
Fathers - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - psychology
Pain
Pregnancy
Public Opinion
Self Concept
Social Support
Time Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Abstract
In Canada, First Nations women are far less likely to breastfeed than other women. First Nations people have been subjected to massive health and social disparities and are at the lowest end of the scale on every measure of well-being. The purpose of this study is to understand the experiences, strengths, and challenges of breastfeeding for First Nations women. Central to the current research is the notion of an embodiment within indigenous women's health and, more specifically, breastfeeding perspectives.
Guided by an indigenous feminist standpoint, our research study evolved through honest discussions and is informed by relevant public health literature on breastfeeding. We collected quantitative data through a survey on demographics and feeding practices, and we conducted focus groups in three Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario) over a period of 1 year (2010) from 65 women in seven First Nation communities.
Three overarching themes are discussed: social factors, including perceptions of self; breastfeeding environments; and intimacy, including the contribution of fathers. The main findings are that breastfeeding is conducive to bed sharing, whereas a history of residential school attendance, physical and psychological trauma, evacuations for childbirth, and teen pregnancy are obstacles to breastfeeding. Also, fathers play a pivotal role in a woman's decision to breastfeed.
Findings from this study contribute to informing public health by reconsidering simplistic health promotion and public health policies and, instead, educating First Nations communities about the complexity of factors associated with multiple breastfeeding environments.
PubMed ID
24606065 View in PubMed
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Attitudes towards priority-setting and rationing in healthcare -- an exploratory survey of Swedish medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90452
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):122-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Omar Faisal
Tinghög Gustav
Tinghög Petter
Carlsson Per
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. faisal.omar@liu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):122-30
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making
Education, Medical
Female
Health Care Rationing - economics - ethics
Health Policy - economics
Health Priorities - economics - ethics
Humans
Male
Primary Health Care - economics - ethics
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Healthcare priority-setting is inextricably linked to the challenge of providing publicly funded healthcare within a limited budget, which may result in difficult and potentially controversial rationing decisions. Despite priority-setting's increasing prominence in policy and academic discussion, it is still unclear what the level of understanding and acceptance of priority-setting is at different levels of health care. AIMS: The aim of this study is threefold. First we wish to explore the level of familiarity with different aspects of priority-setting among graduating medical students. Secondly, to gauge their acceptance of both established and proposed Swedish priority-setting principles. Finally to elucidate their attitudes towards healthcare rationing and the role of different actors in decision making, with a particular interest in comparing the attitudes of medical students with data from the literature examining the attitudes among primary care patients in Sweden. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey containing 14 multiple choice items about priority-setting in healthcare was distributed to the graduating medical class at Linkoöping University. The response rate was 92% (43/47). RESULTS: Less than half of respondents have encountered the notion of open priority-setting, and the majority believed it to be somewhat or very unclear. There is a high degree of awareness and agreement with the established ethical principles for priority-setting in Swedish health care; however respondents are inconsistent in their application of the cost-effectiveness principle. A larger proportion of respondents were more favourable to physicians and other health personnel being responsible for rationing decisions as opposed to politicians. CONCLUSIONS: Future discussion about priority-setting in medical education should be contextualized within an explicit and open process. There is a need to adequately clarify the role of the cost-effectiveness principle in priority-setting. Medical students seem to acknowledge the need for rationing in healthcare to a greater extent when compared with previous results from Swedish primary care patients.
PubMed ID
19141543 View in PubMed
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The Balanced Scorecard: a tool for health policy decision-making.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179722
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):233-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nathalie Auger
Denis A Roy
Author Affiliation
Community Medicine Residency Program, McGill University, Direction de Santé Publique de Montréal-Centre. nauger@santepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 May-Jun;95(3):233-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Emigration and Immigration
Health Policy
Humans
Quebec
Regional Health Planning - methods
Rural Population
Urban Population
PubMed ID
15191139 View in PubMed
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Canada's Insite decision: a victory for public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128637
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Aug;12(3):131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
David M Keepnews
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Aug;12(3):131-2
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Decision Making
Harm Reduction
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Public Health - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
22184103 View in PubMed
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Challenges to the involvement of people living with HIV in community-based HIV/AIDS organizations in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102792
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Feb;26(2):263-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Roy Cain
Evan Collins
Tarik Bereket
Clemon George
Randy Jackson
Alan Li
Tracey Prentice
Robb Travers
Source
AIDS Care. 2014 Feb;26(2):263-6
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Decision Making
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Social Stigma
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
The Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS Principle (GIPA) has been a core commitment for many people involved in the community-based HIV/AIDS movement. GIPA refers to the inclusion of people living with HIV/AIDS in service delivery and decision-making processes that affect their lives. Despite its central importance to the movement, it has received little attention in the academic literature. Drawing on focus group discussions among staff members and volunteers of AIDS service organizations, activists, and community members, we explore challenges to the implementation of the GIPA principle in community-based HIV/AIDS organizations in Ontario, Canada. Our findings reveal ways in which implementing GIPA has become more complicated over recent years. Challenges relating to health, stigma and disclosure, evolving HIV/AIDS organizations, and GIPA-related tensions are identified. This paper considers our findings in light of previous research, and suggests some implications for practice.
PubMed ID
23724932 View in PubMed
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Changes in national child health care policies and their effects on the public health nurse's work in child health care in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229726
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1989 Dec;14(12):1034-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
S H Lauri
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1989 Dec;14(12):1034-7
Date
Dec-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Decision Making
Finland
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Nursing Process
Public Health Nursing - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to clarify the public health nurse's work and decision-making process in child health care during the years 1976-1986. The first study was carried out in 1976 and a subsequent one in 1986. The population of both studies consisted of public health nurses working in child health care centres. During these years many reforms were implemented in national child health care policy. According to the results of the 1986 study the public health nurses used the decision-making process, as a whole, better than in the study of 1976. The content of the health care they provided had become more varied.
PubMed ID
2613956 View in PubMed
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Children in the context of "Achieving Health for All: a Framework for Health Promotion".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229134
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):196-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Hart-Zeldin
I V Kalnins
P. Pollack
R. Love
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioural Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 May-Jun;81(3):196-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Canada
Child
Decision Making
Health education
Health Policy
Health promotion
Humans
Patient Participation
Power (Psychology)
Abstract
We analyze Achieving Health for All: A Framework for Health Promotion with respect to children. Although the document acknowledges the health needs of children, it depicts them as passive beneficiaries of health care efforts taken by others on their behalf. We believe that, like adults, children should become active participants in all of the health-promoting activities proposed in the framework and that they can do so if taught life skills for health which emphasize decision making, coping and community participation skills.
PubMed ID
2361205 View in PubMed
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82 records – page 1 of 9.