Skip header and navigation

Refine By

259 records – page 1 of 26.

Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing health disparities through promoting equity for individuals with intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173499
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Hélène Ouellette-Kuntz
Nathalie Garcin
M E Suzanne Lewis
Patricia Minnes
Carol Martin
Jeanette J A Holden
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Queen's University & Ongwanada. oullette@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S8-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Health Behavior
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Intellectual Disability - classification - genetics - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Abstract
Intellectual disabilities (ID) are conditions originating before the age of 18 that result in significant limitations in intellectual functioning and conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills. IDs affect 1 to 3% of the population. Persons with ID are more likely to have physical disabilities, mental health problems, hearing impairments, vision impairments and communication disorders. These co-existing disabilities, combined with the limitations in intellectual functioning and in adaptive behaviours, make this group of Canadians particularly vulnerable to health disparities. The purpose of this synthesis article is to explore potential contributory factors to health vulnerabilities faced by persons with ID, reveal the extent and nature of health disparities in this population, and examine initiatives to address such differences. The review indicates that persons with ID fare worse than the general population on a number of key health indicators. The factors leading to vulnerability are numerous and complex. They include the way society has viewed ID, the etiology of ID, health damaging behaviours, exposure to unhealthy environments, health-related mobility and inadequate access to essential health and other basic services. For persons with ID there are important disparities in access to care that are difficult to disentangle from discriminatory values and practice. Policy-makers in the United States, England and Scotland have recently begun to address these issues. It is recommended that a clear vision for health policy and strategies be created to address health disparities faced by persons with ID in Canada.
PubMed ID
16078552 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the determinants of child mental health: intersectionality as a guide to primary health care renewal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139222
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Sep;42(3):50-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Charmaine M McPherson
Elizabeth A McGibbon
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Sep;42(3):50-64
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Health Policy
Humans
Mental health
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
Primary health care (PHC) renewal was designed explicitly to attend to the multidimensional factors impacting on health, including the social determinants of health. These determinants are central considerations in the development of integrated, cross-sectoral, and multi-jurisdictional policies such as those that inform models of shared mental health care for children. However, there are complex theoretical challenges in translating these multidimensional issues into policy. One of these is the rarely discussed interrelationships among the social determinants of health and identities such as race, gender, age, sexuality, and social class within the added confluence of geographic contexts. An intersectionality lens is used to examine the complex interrelationships among the factors affecting child mental health and the associated policy challenges surrounding PHC renewal. The authors argue that an understanding of the intersections of social determinants of health, identity, and geography is pivotal in guiding policy-makers as they address child mental health inequities using a PHC renewal agenda.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Nurs Res. 2010 Dec;42(4):2 p preceding table of contents
PubMed ID
21086776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the emergence of pediatric vaccination concerns: recommendations from a Canadian policy analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169730
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kumanan Wilson
Meredith Barakat
Edward Mills
Paul Ritvo
Heather Boon
Sunita Vohra
Alejandro R Jadad
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. Kumanan.Wilson@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Compensation and Redress
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs
Liability, Legal - economics
Organizational Objectives
Pediatrics
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Ever since the advent of pediatric vaccination, individuals have expressed concerns about both its risks and benefits. These concerns have once again resurfaced among some segments of the population and could potentially undermine national vaccination programs. The views of the public, however, must be considered and respected in the formulation of vaccination policy. We have conducted an analysis of the pediatric vaccination "debate" in the Canadian context. We believe that there is common ground between those who support pediatric vaccination and those who are concerned about these programs. Based on our findings, we believe that the goal of public health authorities should be to maintain trust in vaccines by continuing to meet certain reciprocal responsibilities. To do so, we recommend the following: 1) increased investment in adverse event reporting systems; 2) request for proposals for consideration of a no-fault compensation program; 3) developing pre-emptive strategies to deal with potential vaccine risks; 4) further examination of mechanisms to improve communication between physicians and parents concerned about vaccination. All of these approaches would require additional investment in pediatric vaccination. However, such an investment is easy to justify given the benefits offered by pediatric vaccination and the ramifications of failing to maintain confidence in vaccination programs or missing a vaccine-related adverse event.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-916619991
PubMed ID
16620003 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Soins Pediatr Pueric. 2004 Aug;(219):33-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004

Adverse reactions in healthy and immunocompromised children under six years of age vaccinated with the Danish BCG vaccine, strain Copenhagen 1331: implications for the vaccination policy in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36048
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1993 Dec;82(12):1043-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
V. Romanus
A. Fasth
P. Tordai
B E Wiholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Bacteriological Laboratory, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1993 Dec;82(12):1043-52
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
BCG Vaccine - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Health Policy
Humans
Hypertrophy - epidemiology
Immunocompromised Host
Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes - diagnosis
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Abstract
A retrospective analysis of the adverse reactions reported between 1979 and 1991, in the 139,000 children under six years of age vaccinated in Sweden with the Danish BCG vaccine, strain Copenhagen 1331, showed an incidence of 1.9 per 1000 vaccinated children. Regional lymphoglandular swellings and/or abscesses were most commonly reported in 1.4 per 1000. Serious, disseminated, BCG infections developed in four infants vaccinated neonatally. Three of the infants suffered from severe, combined, immunodeficiency syndrome, undiagnosed at the time of vaccination. The incidence of severe, combined, immunodeficiency syndrome was higher in the BCG-vaccinated population (4 per 100,000 infants vaccinated within a year of their births), compared with all newborns in Sweden (1 per 100,000). The mean age at the onset of symptoms was 2.4 months for the seven non-BCG-vaccinated infants versus 1.3 months for the four BCG-vaccinated ones, while the immunodeficiency syndrome was diagnosed at an average age of 7.6 months in those who were not vaccinated versus 5.3 months in those BCG-vaccinated. It is recommended that the selective BCG vaccination of infants at high risk of exposure to tuberculosis should be postponed to six months of age to reduce the risk of inoculating infants suffering from immunodeficiency syndromes.
PubMed ID
8155923 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS and organized medicine: our profession has failed to lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233320
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Mar 15;138(6):560-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1988
Author
I. Mackie
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario.
Source
CMAJ. 1988 Mar 15;138(6):560-1
Date
Mar-15-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - drug therapy
Adult
Canada
Child
Health education
Health Policy
Humans
Male
Ontario
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
3345482 View in PubMed
Less detail

American Academy of Pediatrics. Preventive health care for young children: Findings from a 10-country study and directions for United States policy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36720
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
B C Williams
C A Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599-7400.
Source
Pediatrics. 1992 May;89(5 Pt 2):981-98
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Advocacy
Child Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health Services Research
Humans
Immunization - standards
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Population Surveillance
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Social Support
Social Welfare
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Infant health and survival in the US compare unfavorably with other Western industrial democracies. Circumstances that contribute to favorable pregnancy outcomes in other countries include nearly complete participation of pregnant women in early prenatal care and linkage of care to extensive support benefits. The study reported here extends these earlier observations to preventive health services for children from infancy through adolescence and to the social benefit programs that support their families. This report looks at the condition of children in 10 European countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All of these countries have better infant survival rates than the US, and they all share elements of pluralism in their systems of health care.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatrics. 1992 Dec;90(6):1005-61437418
PubMed ID
1574377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of Bordetella pertussis populations in European countries with different vaccination policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29665
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2005 Jun;43(6):2837-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
S C M van Amersfoorth
L M Schouls
H G J van der Heide
A. Advani
H O Hallander
K. Bondeson
C H W von König
M. Riffelmann
C. Vahrenholz
N. Guiso
V. Caro
E. Njamkepo
Q. He
J. Mertsola
F R Mooi
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Vaccine Preventable Diseases. National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Anthonie van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2005 Jun;43(6):2837-43
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bordetella pertussis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
Europe
Fimbriae Proteins
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Minisatellite Repeats - genetics
Pertussis Vaccine - administration & dosage
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotyping
Vaccination
Virulence Factors - genetics
Whooping Cough - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Despite the widespread use of pertussis vaccines during the last decades, pertussis has remained an endemic disease with frequent epidemic outbreaks. Currently two types of vaccines are used: whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) and recently developed acellular vaccines (ACVs). The long-term aim of our studies is to assess the effect of different vaccination policies on the population structure of Bordetella pertussis and ultimately on the disease burden in Europe. In the present study, a total of 102 B. pertussis isolates from the period 1998 to 2001 from five European countries (Finland, Sweden, Germany, The Netherlands, and France) were characterized. The isolates were analyzed by typing based on variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR); by sequencing of polymorphic genes encoding the surface proteins pertussis toxin S1 and S3 subunits (ptxA and ptxC), pertactin (prn), and tracheal colonization factor (tcfA); and by fimbrial serotyping. The results reveal a relationship between geographic location and VNTR types, the frequency of the ptxC alleles, and serotypes. We have not observed a relationship between the strain characteristics we studied and vaccination programs. Our results provide a baseline which can be used to reveal changes in the B. pertussis population in Europe in the coming years.
PubMed ID
15956406 View in PubMed
Less detail

259 records – page 1 of 26.